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  • Marble run

    I collected a few off cuts of brass, aluminium, stainless and wood and made this marble run for my grandson. There's also a few lengths of copper plumbing pipe split length ways for some of the runs. He's a bit young to be trusted with the metal workings at the moment so I built it inside the perspex case for his protection. He loves it.

    Fred

    Last edited by Pegu 17; 26-03-2021, 11:40 AM.

  • #2
    Fred, you have an extremely lucky grandson!!! I'm not surprised he loves it - it's the sort of thing many people could sit and play with/watch for hours. You are a very clever chap

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    • #3
      I love it myself Fred ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚..brilliant๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿป
      Dave

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      • #4
        Originally posted by craftdancer2 View Post
        Fred, you have an extremely lucky grandson!!! I'm not surprised he loves it - it's the sort of thing many people could sit and play with/watch for hours. You are a very clever chap
        Thanks Linda, but I'm the lucky one. I made it last summer but have not been able to give it to him until now so I have spent many hours playing with it myself.

        Originally posted by 3dDave View Post
        I love it myself Fred ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚..brilliant๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿป
        Dave
        Thanks Dave- it's a lot of fun.

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        • #5
          Thanks Linda, but I'm the lucky one. I made it last summer but have not been able to give it to him until now so I have spent many hours playing with it myself.
          ROFLMAO! Nice one

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          • #6
            Just .......... AMAZING! Lovely workmanship, and a great idea that's been very well thought out.

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            • #7
              Pegu 17 Here's a little something I made that might interest you, seeing as you are very hands-on and also that you use perspex in your projects.

              A couple of years ago I made myself an (admittedly, rather rough!) acrylic bending machine for 2 to 3mm acrylic sheet. It uses a nichrome wire held taught beween two springs connected to a low voltage supply to provide the heat required for bending.

              At the time, I was making and selling Tide Clocks, with a clear acrylic stand (bent with my machine), a dye-subbed aluminium face, and a tide clock movement. They came out very nice and I sold quite a few but the price of the movements increased too much to make them viable any more.

              naut_clock1.jpg

              naut_clock2.jpg

              As you can see below, only 4.34 Amps of current is drawn from a low voltage of 12.8 Volts, making the machine very safe to operate (apart from burnt fingers for the over-zealous!).

              HWAB_real1.jpg

              HWAB_real2.jpg

              I purposely made the wire interchangeable (unlike all of the youtube videos of similar machines) so that if a wire ever burned out , or snapped, then I could swap it out for a new one in seconds. I used the brass 'ball ends' that are fitted to guitar strings on the ends of the wire so that it would easily slip over the springs. Here's a rendered mockup of my design showing how the wire is attached to the springs ...

              HWAB_4.jpg

              Apart from the clock stands I made my grandkids some phone and tablet stands but have yet to use the machine to its full potential (ie. easily sidetracked by other projects!!!).
              Last edited by webtrekker; 28-03-2021, 12:39 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by webtrekker View Post
                Pegu 17 Here's a little something I made that might interest you, seeing as you are very hands-on and also that you use perspex in your projects.......................................... ..............
                Hi. Yes that does look interesting. I have often thought of something along those lines but as yet have not had a project that would need it but I will bear your creation in mind when the time comes.

                It does remind me of a crude method of cutting polystyrene I have used where I simply fasten a piece of thin copper wire between two sticks and connect to a battery. Works well but not very sophisticated (or possibly not very safe) but alright in small doses.

                Fred.

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