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Resawing slice of beech tree

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  • Resawing slice of beech tree

    Heya, all

    I have a request from a London school to do some pyrography on a large slice of beech tree... but that slice needs cutting in half first. It's far, far too big for us to handle in our little shed , and I need to find someone to resaw it for me.

    The piece is beech, from a tree felled in 2008, and it's a round slice cut straight through the thickness of the tree. It's a slice 3" thick, and is actually oval, 27.5" x 22" in size, still with the bark on it.
    They'd like it cut in half into two thinner oval slices, each about 1.5" thick, with the bark left on, and one face of each slice to be planed/sanded smooth and flat.
    There is a 8" crack in this piece, probably because the slice was just left to stand indoors once it was cut, but as it was cut three years ago, I'd hope that it should be dry by now and thus not move when it's cut again.

    Anyone know of a place that could do this?
    Cheers,
    Scorch

    Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
    Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

  • #2
    You would need someone with a posh bandsaw to do that Scorch. Cutting something that size cleanly would be difficult. Have a wander on some of the woodwork forums, there m,ay be someone who can help there. I'll ask on the one I belong to later if you like

    Pete
    "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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    • #3
      Yeah - it's such a massive object, it needs a really big resaw, designed for the job - such a machine probably wouldn't even FIT in our shed! I reckon you're right about other forums - please do repost it if you would, indeed... thanks a bunch.
      Cheers,
      Scorch

      Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
      Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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      • #4
        IMO I wouldn't attempt to re-saw a piece of those dimensions, especially as the edges won't be stable. 'square to the cut'. I reckon that if you only want one slab try having it planed down to thickness, but even trying that you may find difficulty in finding a planer that will take a slab that wide.

        As a one off it may be worth thinking along the lines of a cheap powered hand plane.
        Last edited by TePe; 02-08-2011, 10:32 PM. Reason: spelling mistake
        regards

        Tam "now a hobby woodturner"


        There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. (John Ruskin 1819-1900)

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        • #5
          I am wondering if one of those machines that splits trees into logs would do the job? Its like a horizontal bandsaw. A sawmill might have one of these.
          At the college I went to for my cabinet making course (just finished) they had a monster of a belt sanding machine. The sanding belt was about 2' wide so if you could find somewhere that has one they would be able to do the surfaces for you.
          Sorry I'm being a bit vague but it might help.

          H.
          Helen

          www.HRMCrafts.com

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          • #6
            I put this up on the woodworking forum and the general consensus is that it is pretty much a no go. Getting two slices equal would be pretty much impossible without really spe******ed equipment. Only suggestion was to cut the pieces in half across, bandsaw those into two slices then glue back. Sorry Tracey,

            Pete
            "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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            • #7
              In the old days they would of cut it in half with two men on a hand saw and would of taken it to a smooth finish with an adze such as they did to make chair seats and oak beams etc but is would be quite difficult and time consuming cuting into end grain.

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              • #8
                Heya, all

                Well, I found a man who reackons he can do the trick for me - he's a woodworker of many years standing who has a MASSIVE WoodMiser horizontal resaw that will cut stuff up to 24" across. He assures me that if there's a straight line through the thing, he can cut along it! But, due to the amount of work involved in getting the piece aligned just right and safely secured, there is considerable cost involved.

                But that's only as it should be, really! We'll see if the school goes for it...

                Thanks to everyone who tried to help - much appreciated!
                Cheers,
                Scorch

                Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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                • #9
                  How did this turn out, Tracie - nosey person wants to know <BG>
                  Lesley
                  Wydon Crafts www.wydon.co.uk
                  Bedfordshire

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                  • #10
                    Heya.

                    The slice went off to him from the school yesterday and we'll see how it turns out - well, I hope!
                    Cheers,
                    Scorch

                    Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                    Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

                    Comment

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