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what Jig?

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  • what Jig?

    Hi all.

    Now that I am doing a lot more turning I am starting to need to ensure my tools are kept properly sharpened and it is taking too much time doing it by hand and so I'm looking to get a sharpening jig. Can anyone recommend a good one and preferably give a link? I like the idea of the one which uses an extendable arm on the baseboard of the grinder as I have a few different chisels that will need sharpening and greatly prefer the fingernail grind on my gouges.

    thanks folks!
    Asking me to make you a shelf is like asking Michealangelo to creosote your fence.

    http://www.woodsweatandtrees.co.uk

  • #2
    Hi. IMO too much emphasis is put on jigs for use in sharpening turning tools. Each jig has it's own learning curve and some are quite hard to master properly.

    The one you mention sounds like the Oneway or Craft Supplies unit, and I agree that they do seem to be one of the easiest to use, although I don't like the fingernail jig that they both use.

    My set up is a 6" grinder with white wheel and leather wheel which I take out when turning out of my workshop. In the workshop I use a Record 8" with two white wheels, on one wheel I have a home made flat table, and on the other a sliding arm that you mention. What I use for a fingernail jig is of my own construction, a copy of the Hamlet finger nail jig, but used in a sliding arm. My argument being that finding a good angle for a long grind is awkward enough without having so many variables like you have on the other vari jigs.

    With the Hamlet style you set the projection of the gouge from the front of the tool holder, this measurement is a constant. Then the only adjustment I use is the in and out movement of the arm, ie - I have it out to do the 60deg bevel for bowl gouges, push it in a bit to get the 45deg angle for spindle gouges. ALL other tools are sharpened on the flat angle table, similar to the Keith Rowley design from his book.

    We have a Wolverine jig at the club I frequent and it is a laugh when you watch folks trying to match up their grind done at home with the jig, they alter the projection, then the angle of the arm, then the support arm. Then still end up not matching the grind.

    My system is the best for me with only one adjustment for all my gouges, as long as they project the 2".

    Here is a very simple design of what I use, although I constructed mine in steel.

    Good luck with your choice, there are many out there, but at the end of the day all you want to do is replicate the sharpening of tools each time so you can get back to the lathe. You can spend from about £40 to £250 and more to achieve the same end result, really just depends on the readies you have lying around.

    added on = Good link which gives you the relevant dimensions to achieve the angles you need if you fancy making a jig yourself.
    Last edited by TePe; 01-04-2011, 09:31 AM. Reason: adding link
    regards

    Tam "now a hobby woodturner"


    There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. (John Ruskin 1819-1900)

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    • #3
      Tam ... what can I say mate ...you are a legend! I had run across that link before and liked the look of the homemade kit and to be fair I am competent enough to reproduce it but without the measurements page it would have been trial and error but now I can get fabricating! Im off to my woodyard as we speak...lol

      cheers!

      Ash
      Asking me to make you a shelf is like asking Michealangelo to creosote your fence.

      http://www.woodsweatandtrees.co.uk

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      • #4
        Your welcome Ash, 'Owt to save a bob or two' that's me.
        regards

        Tam "now a hobby woodturner"


        There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. (John Ruskin 1819-1900)

        Comment

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