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Varnish help!

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  • Varnish help!

    Hi, I'm a newbie pyrographer and just getting around to varnishing some of the pieces (protect, last longer, blah blah blah lol) - but what on earth can I use to varnish candle holders?! Tealite holders especially... All the varnishes and waxes I've found are flammable!

    I think that would provide a rather nasty shock for any customer...

    So far I've been selling them unfinished (though my first craft table isn't until October, a small shop has sold a couple of my things on sale or return), and I know most people don't tend to put candleholders in sunlight - so it'll take a long time for the burn to fade... But I think it would look better and they'd last longer if I could 'finish' them...

    Can anyone help? Cheers!

    B xx
    www.morgannacraft.co.uk
    Facebook fan page!

  • #2
    In the trade we would use a fast drying varnish like Craftlac Melamine. It is quite versatile in that you can make it a shiny, satin or matt type of finish using various techniqes and applying things like bees wax etc

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    • #3
      I never use varnish. You can sand the wood to a really good finish then simply oil with any vegetable oil. Alternatively use an acrylic, water based finish such as this

      Always use an insert as well, it isn't a good idea to put the aluminium light directly into the wood, some woods can char and there is a danger of them catching fire. If you are selling on always best to play safe.

      Pete
      "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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      • #4
        Wow thanks guys! You've both been a real help Looks like I've got another shopping list lol...
        www.morgannacraft.co.uk
        Facebook fan page!

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        • #5
          I'm very fond of a few applications of dutch oil followed (a day or two later) by beeswax (carnuba free)

          If you get the wood sanded to a fine grit you will get a vey nice sheen... very "polished" like

          The other alternative as others have said would be a water based acrylic laquer, again plenty of sanding

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          • #6
            I use water-based PVA vernish - dries like plastic. Waxes don't seem to help with the UV issue, sadly...
            Cheers,
            Scorch

            Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
            Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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