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  • Holly Wood

    Hello Folks!

    Does anyone on here work with Holly Wood? At a craft fair I spotted a pen made from Holly wood as I kicking myself for not buying it now as I have a sister called Holly :-)

    It doesn't have to be a pen...

    Jodie
    www.joyceandjodie.folksy.com

  • #2
    Unfortunately I have a pile of holly but it is still wet and fresh and won't be ready for a good while. It tends to split if not dried thoroughyl. One of the other wood workers might have some though

    Pete
    "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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    • #3
      What are the markings like of holly? For such a prickly leaf the stems are very smooth, is that the quality, that the wood is very smooth? (I love burr walnut and birds eye maple, how do those markings come about?) Sorry, I should get a book
      Facebook page, Cottage Charms & Cards: http://www.facebook.com/update_secur...20677888001883

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      • #4
        It's a white, almost grainless wood. Often used in the past for inlay work on fancy furniture. It's a hard wood and polishes ups well. It tends to be a wet wood and so can split badly when drying , It looks almost like ivory when turned and polished and is often used to make the white pieces for chess.

        Pete
        "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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        • #5
          Jodie

          I might have some dry holly, I'm off to my 'shed' this evening to look, but it would only be for a small item, pen, very small dish, key ring etc. PM me for more info tomorrow.

          Phil

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          • #6
            That's weird. The looks like ivory thing. I heard on the radio ivy wood lookes like ivory too.
            AnnieAnna

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            • #7
              It's a lovely wood to pyro on... but sadly I don't have any!
              Cheers,
              Scorch

              Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
              Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by nettie View Post
                What are the markings like of holly? For such a prickly leaf the stems are very smooth, is that the quality, that the wood is very smooth? (I love burr walnut and birds eye maple, how do those markings come about?) Sorry, I should get a book
                The burr walnut is from round tumor-like growths on the side of the trees or on the roots. Not so sure about the maple but I'm sure wikipedia will tell you.

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                • #9
                  Burrs, birds eye are basically the same thing. A canker grows on the tree and little shoots spring from iyt leaving the small dots that give the maple it's name. It tends to be expensive and os usually a hard wood. As Scorch said, holly is ideal for pyro as once dry it is like paper with an ink drawing and is also hard enough to take the burning. Soft wood can spread and give blurred lines.

                  Pete
                  "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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