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Protection For House Signs

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  • Protection For House Signs

    Hello All

    I hear it can be a problem that Pyrography signs for outdoor use can fade, I have just finished my first sign and i have coated it with Danish Oil but now im wondering if i should have used a UV inhibitor?

    I hope to be able to sell my signs at some stage and it would be a real problem if customers found them selves with a blank sign on their house after its been outside in the sunshine for a while.


    What do you recommend to provent this?
    How Quickly can they fade?
    Do you recommend a UV inhibitor?
    If so Can you recommend a good one?
    Can i use it on the sign that i have already coated with Danish Oil?

    Thanks in anticipation

    Nancy

  • #2
    HI nancy,

    I asked this question a while back.
    I was advised to use yacht varnish - I picked up a pot in B&Q.
    I put 3 coats on.
    Hope this helps - sorry not sure of the answer about the danish oil
    http://www.samigailsgifts.co.uk/
    Handmade personalised gifts for all occasions created by the art of pyrography
    My Facebook

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    • #3
      Yacht varnish is the fella - Danish oil will help protect the wood against environmental effects like moisture / humidity but a good few coats of yacht varnish should keep your designs safe for many a year.

      With summer coming up, how about doing a few test samples, treat them with different coatings and leave them by a window / greenhouse / on the roof over the summer.

      That should give you a good idea what does and does not work.
      Reality is an illusion, albeit a persistant one.
      - A. Einstein

      Hand crafted Driftwood gifts and homewares from North Devon
      www.whitepebblebay.co.uk

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      • #4
        Get a good yacht varnish with UV inhibitors and add several coats (you usually need to allow at least 16 hours between each coat). The sign should be re-varnished every 2-3 years to prevent wear and tear. Ideally, I would also recommend that the sign is positioned carefully as well... if it can be placed out of strong direct sunlight (or at least in a place that gets some good periods of shade throughout the day), all the better.

        Hope this helps.

        Si.
        Wood Tattoos
        Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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        • #5
          I've had exactly this issue, as my designs are typically quite delicate, and can fade out in a year. I no longer make outdoor signs due to this problem - I had to refund customers their money. Best of luck with overcoming it!
          Cheers,
          Scorch

          Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
          Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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          • #6
            Thanks to you all for the information.

            Scorch - Ouch That sounds terrible, were your signs burnt quite boldly and did you use a UV inhibitor on yours?

            i will do some tests but id really like to get producing quite quickly and cant really wait a year just to see what happrens

            It seems some of you have had success just using the simple Yatch varnish while other have had difficulties,
            I guess to be on the safe side ill try and use a Yatch Varnish with The UV Inhibitor Ive just been down to B&Q but i cant find a varnish with the UV inhibitor ( not that it says so on the tin anyway!) does anybody know where to get it?

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            • #7
              That's the thing, Nancy - I do more delicate work than most pyrographers, not the super-bold stuff at all. And I wasn't even aware that it COULD fade when I made them and sent them out.
              I used spirit-based outdoor varnish that said it was UV-resistant, which was the best I could find anywhere... sigh...
              Cheers,
              Scorch

              Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
              Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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              • #8
                Hi Scorch

                I see you are online - it would be awesome to talk to you - shame there isnt a live chat facility on here - would you be happy to talk on MSN Messenger? though i dont know how we could Privately exchange Email addresses

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                • #9
                  I carve house plaques and use yacht varnish. Yacht varnish can range from £7 to£35 per ltr. All yacht varnishes have UV as far as I know. They say the norm is 5 years.
                  One thing on buying exterior varnish. Make sure it’s clear!! Open the tin and have a look. Ronseal do an exterior varnish that is very good. It says it’s clear but it’s not. It has an additive to bring out the grain and it’s brown. When I do my plaques I use a sanding sealer first. This dries in 10 min. Then fine sand paper to nib off. The surface is now pretty smooth but not too much. Then I brush on one coat of varnish. Leave 24hrs nib off then the next. My final coat I use a sponge and a peg. By dabbing all over then dragging the sponge across you will get a better finish. Some times my plaques come up like glass.

                  Apart from varnish if cash is plenty you could use a two pack lacquer and spray it on. If I had the room that’s what I would do. I have some boxes that I sprayed 30 years ago with acrylic single pack lacquer and they are still perfect today. Mind you, they haven’t been out in the sun but its car body paint. This would save time and a perfect finish too. Not only that it’s dry in just few hours.

                  Roger

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                  • #10
                    Nancy - sorry, I didn't see your message! I was online, indeed, but was at work. (In in IT, so my PC is on all day!) So you could reach me via MSN, but I wouldn't really be able to chat to you very long... But I'll PM you my email address...
                    Cheers,
                    Scorch

                    Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                    Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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                    • #11
                      Hello Roger

                      Many thanks for the tips.. I didnt realise that all Yacht varnish contains UV inhibitors, if thats the case it will be much easier buy, ive seen it in B&Q!.

                      again, very many thanks

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                      • #12
                        Don’t for get to get them to open the tin. I haven’t seen B&Qs brand. I use Wilkinson’s own brand. I paint my plaques with colors, one shot American sign writer’s paints and I varnish 3 coats over the top.

                        Roger

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                        • #13
                          Hello Roger

                          I bought some yacht varnish yesterday from B&Q, Its not their own Brand, its called International Yacht Varnish and it does say on the tin that it has UV inhibitors ( i must have missed that when i looked the first time) i bought the small tin which was £5.50 ish for 250ml though the 1 litre tin is £11.50, which is obviously a much better buy. I painted the first coat yesterday and will do a second today. it has coloured the wood very very slightly which i find acceptable - fingers crossed it will afford some protection.

                          I found a web site from the USA where a gentleman had done some quite intensive tests on the effects of fading on pyrography with different coatings and his findings were that you cant provent it completely - his tests were conducted in full sun and his test pieces did seem to be burnt quite lightly and all the finishes showed a some amount of fading after only 3.5 months, some obviously provided better protection than others while others seemed to provide no protection compared to his sample that had no treatment at all - unfortunately it seems that he did not test yacht varnish, he did use the names of the substance rather than brand names so perhaps he did, ill have to look at the ingredience - I cant remember the web address but ill find it for you if you are interested.

                          his tests we
                          cheers

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                          • #14
                            Great advice! I would have commented myself, but havn't been on for a few days!
                            I've been working on a lot of signs recently ( i will try and post them up soon), I would just have to agree with the other advice regarding uv varnish.

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