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  • fine drawings onto wood.

    i was fighting with my bookmark last night..

    i was trying to put a picture on it that has very fine detail but was struggling with transferring it to the wood.

    has anyone got any hints or tips?

  • #2
    Yup -

    This is how I work with computer images :
    Open the image in some editing software.
    Get it into black & white, turn the contrast all the way up, turn the tone balance up, to get a clear, bold image.
    Flip the image horizontally, to get a mirror image, and save the new image.
    Get some paper that's been through a laser printer, and print the new image on the reverse of that with an inkjet printer.
    Let it dry thoroughly, then simply rub it down onto the wood as you would with a tracing, with firm, even pressure.
    I'm especially privileged to have a special rubdown stick, made from a little bit of ebony (as my beloved is a woodturner) but a run-out biro or a smooth-ended anything will work too. It works on wood and leather, and rubs out just like pencil.
    Cheers,
    Scorch

    Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
    Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Scorch View Post
      Yup -

      This is how I work with computer images :
      Open the image in some editing software.
      Get it into black & white, turn the contrast all the way up, turn the tone balance up, to get a clear, bold image.
      Flip the image horizontally, to get a mirror image, and save the new image.
      Get some paper that's been through a laser printer, and print the new image on the reverse of that with an inkjet printer.
      Let it dry thoroughly, then simply rub it down onto the wood as you would with a tracing, with firm, even pressure.
      I'm especially privileged to have a special rubdown stick, made from a little bit of ebony (as my beloved is a woodturner) but a run-out biro or a smooth-ended anything will work too. It works on wood and leather, and rubs out just like pencil.
      Great tip there scorch thanks.
      Sarah

      Comment


      • #4
        ok.....dunno how i would do that, dontknow anyone with a laser printer...oh bum!!

        Comment


        • #5
          If you have an inkjet printer, then you can try any very smooth & shiny paper.

          Paper that's been through a photocopier will probably work, too - they have the same sort of hot drum mechanism inside, that'll heat-smooth ordinary paper.

          Y'see, unlike the usual case, where you WANT the ink to soak into the paper, in this case you don't want it to soak in too much, but instead dry on the surface... I know this way works, but there's probably other ways of getting it to do that!
          Cheers,
          Scorch

          Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
          Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

          Comment


          • #6
            You can also (very carefully) use an inkjet transparency - on the 'wrong' side (ie not the side which is slightly sticky when moistened. You need to keep your ink settings very light. This effectively makes a rub on. You need to watch out that you place it accurately or it can smudge, but it does work!
            george
            www.mizgeorge.co.uk
            www.etsy.com/shop/mizgeorge
            www.flickr.com/mizgeorge

            Comment


            • #7
              oh man im useless, am struggling with this......

              Comment


              • #8
                I suppose you've done the tracing paper method, simple but time consuming drawing around every single line and detail!
                Facebook page, Cottage Charms & Cards: http://www.facebook.com/update_secur...20677888001883

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Scorch View Post
                  Yup -

                  This is how I work with computer images :
                  Open the image in some editing software.
                  Get it into black & white, turn the contrast all the way up, turn the tone balance up, to get a clear, bold image.
                  Flip the image horizontally, to get a mirror image, and save the new image.
                  Get some paper that's been through a laser printer, and print the new image on the reverse of that with an inkjet printer.
                  Let it dry thoroughly, then simply rub it down onto the wood as you would with a tracing, with firm, even pressure.
                  I'm especially privileged to have a special rubdown stick, made from a little bit of ebony (as my beloved is a woodturner) but a run-out biro or a smooth-ended anything will work too. It works on wood and leather, and rubs out just like pencil.
                  Just to let you know thanks!! i managed it and it worked a treat, also found that it rubbed off easier thanpencil...

                  Thank yoouu!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Excellent! I discovered it by accident, and I'm glad it works for you too!
                    Cheers,
                    Scorch

                    Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                    Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      yeah it worked very well. Will definately use this method again, bit easier too than tracing!! lol

                      thanks again.....MIL loved the bookmark btw.

                      i went to a craft fair yesterday and had a very interesting chat with a bloke there doing pyro....he wsa using a wired machine, looked really fab and easy to use....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        pattern transfer

                        Evening folks I have been wondering if you put injet parer through a laminating machine would it have the same afect Mal
                        http://www.maddogwoodart.com
                        http://www.folksy.com/shops/puzzlesinwood

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, you could try it. I'm not sure my inkjet would even print on something laminated, but it might work...
                          Cheers,
                          Scorch

                          Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                          Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Zap! Creatives - Image Transfers

                            Try photocopying your image in reverse then transfering onto the wood using Cellulose Thinners...

                            Turn the image face down so that it is contact with the wood or other porous material and then rub the back with a cotton wool ball soaked in the thinners.

                            You have to use a photocopy for this to work though as it's the carbon that is transfered.


                            Dave

                            Zap! Creatives
                            Laser Cutting, Acrylic Printing & Craft Supplies.
                            Dave
                            Zap! Creatives
                            Laser Cutting, Acrylic Printing & Craft Supplies

                            www.zapcreatives.co.uk

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              And then you're burning a layer of cellulose thinners... can't say I fancy it, nor any other solvent-based method, to be honest.
                              Cheers,
                              Scorch

                              Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                              Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

                              Comment

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