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How do you cut and sew knitted jumpers???

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  • StefC
    replied
    If they were all wool I would suggest felting them in a hot wash.

    But I sew up jumpers on my machine, I make cushion covers and hat and scarf sets out of them. I usually just cut them up and sew them together (immediately) without doing anything to them but sometimes, based only on gut feeling, I'll stitch the edges first.

    Check your sewing machine's stitch selection, I love using the stretchy stitch, and use a zig zag to sew up the pieces, and the edges if you decide to do that.

    Basically, don't panic, just organise your time so you don't have to leave cut/unsewn edges lying around to unravel.

    Have fun and remember, we really like pictures

    Leave a comment:


  • ReviveRevampRemake
    replied
    I have a pattern for a wool coat which is made entirely out of cut wool jumpers. There's a video that goes with it and she cuts before sewing together. She then sews them all on an over locker.
    I too would be worried about unravelling but it can be done. I think the way the designer of this pattern manages to cut without unravelling is by only using wool not acrylic and then washing in hot water before sewing. This would felt the fibres slightly giving you the chance to sew it all together without too much unravelling!
    Definitely be interested to see more comments on what others have done.

    Leave a comment:


  • vonny
    replied
    Hiya,
    Bear with me on this - in the past, I have knitted several Norwegian sweaters, the bodies of which are knitted in a tube. The armholes are created by stitching four machine rows and then CUTTING the knitted garment. The first time I did it, I was terrified! However, it works (and still going strong, over 35 years later)!

    Where am I going with this? Well, my advice would be to machine four rows on the seams, about 3mm apart, BEFORE cutting the garment. This should work for both handmade and machine knits.

    Nowadays, most domestic sewing machines have a stretch stitch facility for use with knitted fabrics and you don't need to change needles.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by vonny; 05-02-2013, 07:53 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bubbles_and_snuggles
    replied
    Originally posted by eena View Post
    What you are thinking of doing is perfectly possible, and there are ways of coping with the problems which may (and only may) arise.

    Are they wool or synthetic? Hand-knitted, machine knitted? Factory or home-made? Plain stocking stitch, lacy or cabled patterns and textures?

    I can help more specifically when I know this.
    Thank you. It is several different jumpers - some are hand knitted, some are machine knitted, some factory, and some home made The one I'm hoping to start with though is a hand knitted stocking stitch synthetic cardigan. It is one that my nan actually made so it is very precious to me and would be very upset if it all goes wrong. I hope you can help. Thank you again!!!! Xxxxxx

    Leave a comment:


  • eena
    replied
    Sorry, cuckoos nest, I have to disagree, Under some circumstances what you describe nay indeed happen - but there are a great many situations (ie fibres and types of knitting) where it most assuredly will not happen, and other types of fibre and knitting where what you describe can be avoided by simple actions, which is why I asked the OP for more details before writing what would amount to a book in answer to her query.

    I frequently use my sewing machine to sew up the edges of steeks on garments I have knitted, with no issues whatsoever for me, the machine or the garment. Other steeks do not need sewing at all ​and unravelling is not a problem. That is on newly-knitted garments, there are lots more options for recycling items as the OP wishes to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cuckoos Nest
    replied
    If you just cut them up, yes, they will unravel. The only way to do this would be to lay them out and first backstitch all around the shape you want the cushion to be. Then cut out leaving a couple of centimetres border (which will start to unravel but the backstitching will stop it unravelling into the cushion. Do this twice (or cut out a piece of material for the backing). Hand sew the two sides together using backstitching and then go round again with blanket stitching to overlock the raw edges.

    I wouldn't advise trying to put knitting through a sewing machine at all. The sewn edges will stretch out of shape as it's pushed under the presser foot and you won't get a good result. Also, depending on the yarn, the fibres could mess up your sewing machine.

    Have you considered unpicking your grandma's jumpers, winding into a skein (round a big book or something) washing the wool and then re-knitting it into a cushion? I think this would probably give you a much better result without the problems. Let us know how you get on!

    Leave a comment:


  • eena
    replied
    What you are thinking of doing is perfectly possible, and there are ways of coping with the problems which may (and only may) arise.

    Are they wool or synthetic? Hand-knitted, machine knitted? Factory or home-made? Plain stocking stitch, lacy or cabled patterns and textures?

    I can help more specifically when I know this.

    Leave a comment:


  • How do you cut and sew knitted jumpers???

    I am planning on cutting my nans old knitted cardigans and jumpers and making some cushion covers out of them. I have never done this before and Im a bit anxious about it. How will I stop them from unravelling please? Would I just cut them as I would normal fabric and zig zag them like I would normal fabric? Would they go through a sewing machine ok? Would I use the same needles I normally use? Thank you!!!! Xxxxxxxxxxxx
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