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Making draft excluders

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  • Making draft excluders

    I've just bought myself a nice bit of curtain/upholstery fabric on ebay and want to make a draft excluder. What would be the best thing to stuff it with? I have some basic stuffing (from a cushion) would that do?
    Visit Natty Netty for a huge selection of Iris Folding supplies


  • #2
    My nan used to make them when I was a kid ** years ago and stuffed them with her old stockings cut up. (washed naturally LOL) and they worked a treat. Tights would probably be the equivalent today. She used to make one into a snake with eyes and tongue for my room.

    Pete
    "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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    • #3
      i would roll up a towel or something like that and then add the shion stuffing around the outside of that before covering. I think that if you really want to block out drafts rather than just decorative, then the towel weight would keep it heavy enough to sit onto the floor. if you simply use the cushion stuffing, it would be rather light weight and not do the job properly.
      full time mum and very very part time crafter.

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      • #4
        That brought back memories Pete! Yes, old stockings were the thing to stuff draught excluders with 'back in the day', but Karen is correct when she says it needs weight to be effective.
        Annie and Lyn
        www.rosiepink.typepad.co.uk

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        • #5
          I usually shove pebbles into the centre to give it that extra weight.
          Carol
          God helps them that help themselves.

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          • #6
            Never thought about the weight part of it so thanks for the towel and pebble suggestions. Pete I'm pretty sure my Nan's draft excluders were stuffed with stockings too but alas I don't wear tights, her's had eyes and tongues sewn on too.
            Visit Natty Netty for a huge selection of Iris Folding supplies

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            • #7
              I know it's probably cheating a bit, but I made a draught excluder as a Christmas present last year. My friend wanted a double sized one to go in front of her French doors. I found some cheap ready made ones in wilkinsons, I think they were only a few pounds each. They were made from cotton, so I made my own outer from my fabric and then used these as the stuffing, the bonus being that the cotton covers they already had means she could remove the cover I made to wash.

              a bit cheaty, but it saved me making a lining! I added a bit of extra stuffing to make them firmer.
              Wid

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              • #8
                I made some draught excluders about 20 years ago, and they're still doing well! The method is quite different, and they don't use stuffing. I'll try and explain ( but it will probably come out double dutch!)

                Take 2 pieces of the grey polystyrene 'tube' that is used to insulate water pipes, cut just less than the width of the door. Cut the material a bit longer and allow for hems etc, and wide enough to go round both tubes with a flat section in the middle - this is the part that slides under the door. When you slide it under the door, you then have an excluder on both sides of the door, and it moves with the door so you don't have to keep pushing it back into place. An end-on view would be a bit like O_O

                Hope you can follow it!

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                • #9
                  I brought one like this a few years ago from betterware, worked really well would be great to make one like this.

                  Originally posted by Cowslip View Post
                  I made some draught excluders about 20 years ago, and they're still doing well! The method is quite different, and they don't use stuffing. I'll try and explain ( but it will probably come out double dutch!)

                  Take 2 pieces of the grey polystyrene 'tube' that is used to insulate water pipes, cut just less than the width of the door. Cut the material a bit longer and allow for hems etc, and wide enough to go round both tubes with a flat section in the middle - this is the part that slides under the door. When you slide it under the door, you then have an excluder on both sides of the door, and it moves with the door so you don't have to keep pushing it back into place. An end-on view would be a bit like O_O

                  Hope you can follow it!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cowslip View Post
                    I made some draught excluders about 20 years ago, and they're still doing well! The method is quite different, and they don't use stuffing. I'll try and explain ( but it will probably come out double dutch!)

                    Take 2 pieces of the grey polystyrene 'tube' that is used to insulate water pipes, cut just less than the width of the door. Cut the material a bit longer and allow for hems etc, and wide enough to go round both tubes with a flat section in the middle - this is the part that slides under the door. When you slide it under the door, you then have an excluder on both sides of the door, and it moves with the door so you don't have to keep pushing it back into place. An end-on view would be a bit like O_O

                    Hope you can follow it!
                    like this!
                    full time mum and very very part time crafter.

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                    • #11
                      Hey, that looks like just the thing I need. Gues what I will be doing first thing after all the visitors have gone. Thanks for that.
                      Carol
                      God helps them that help themselves.

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