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How to remove glaze from ceramics to refire

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  • How to remove glaze from ceramics to refire

    I have just glazed and fired a few pieces and it turns out there was something wrong with the glaze. It did not cover evenly and in some places it bubbled even though it was not thick.

    Someone suggested the glaze was too old? If so how do you check?

    So someone has also suggested that the glaze can be removed with a metal hand file and then I can reglaze. Does that sound possible?

  • #2
    Not in my experience. When I've had glazing disasters the pots got chucked. In the amount of time it would take to remove the glaze (which is really, really hard to do) you could have made three times as many pots again.

    Did you wipe the pots over with a damp sponge before glazing to remove any clay dust?

    Even if you did, the glaze sounds odd, are you sure you're using the correct glaze for the kind of clay, and are you sure you're firing to the correct temperature?
    Daesul

    http://www.clairemanwani.com
    http://www.folksy.com/shops/clairemanwani
    http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ClaireManwaniPottery

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    • #3
      Originally posted by agnieszka View Post
      I have just glazed and fired a few pieces and it turns out there was something wrong with the glaze. It did not cover evenly and in some places it bubbled even though it was not thick.

      Someone suggested the glaze was too old? If so how do you check?

      So someone has also suggested that the glaze can be removed with a metal hand file and then I can reglaze. Does that sound possible?
      Even if you could remove the glaze with a metal file (which I've never, EVER heard of before) you wouldn't be able to re-glaze because the piece has been fired to glaze temperature so it would not be porous.

      In my experience, glaze doesn't grow old, or go off. As long as it's mixed thoroughly to get rid of the thick sediment that accumulates when it's been left a while, there's no reason for it not to be OK.

      It sound as though the glaze you're using isn't the right glaze for the clay body, either that or you haven't got your firing cycle quite right.
      Kate
      www.cuckoos-nest-fairs.co.uk

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      • #4
        I know of some businesses that remove small parts of glaze with a dremel (usually when two items have been lightly fused together during firing). The dremelled item is then touched up with glaze and re-fired on a slow ramp. However, I've not heard of anyone attempting a whole piece.

        I agree with the other threads. It sounds like an incompatibility issue between the clay and glaze .... or the glaze has not been fired to the recommended temperature. I do recall one situation when something similar happened. It turned out that the controller had broken causing the kiln to over-fire. The glaze blistered and then patches of glaze completely burnt out to reveal raw bisque in random places.

        Although glazes & underglazes don't tend to go out of date, we have noticed that performance is affected if the mixture has been accidentally frozen (e.g. if stored outside in a shed or garage during the winter).

        It's horrible when it goes wrong isn't it?
        COUNTRY LOVE CRAFTS - 01235 861700
        Ceramic Supplies, Craft Blanks, Acrylic Paints, Decopatch and Much More! Global shipping. Speedy Deliveries.
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        • #5
          Forgot to mention these links which you may find useful:

          http://www.countryloveceramics.com/g...-glaze-firing/
          http://www.ortonceramic.com/resources/
          http://www.ortonceramic.com/resource...ze_Defects.pdf
          COUNTRY LOVE CRAFTS - 01235 861700
          Ceramic Supplies, Craft Blanks, Acrylic Paints, Decopatch and Much More! Global shipping. Speedy Deliveries.
          Facebook * Twitter * Website * E-mail *

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          • #6
            We all make mistakes! Mistakes and failures are how we learn! Failures of this kind lead to improved techniques ( as long as we are aware of what the problem is!)

            There is nothing that you can do at this stage! Put these pots behind you and move on.

            I like to think that there is no such thing as a mistake or a failure... It can be soul destroying though!!! We just need to learn, adapt, change and move on.

            Glazed pottery is not very open to change! It's just a little bit of a one way process, set in stone, as it were!

            I'm sorry that we can't give you a more satisfactory answer.

            terrorcotta
            Last edited by terrorcotta; 18-07-2011, 08:15 PM.
            We all sit on the banks of the same river.

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