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Anyone ever made a potters stamp ?

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  • Anyone ever made a potters stamp ?

    We have never 'marked' the underneath of our pottery..maybe in the early 70's some of the 'one off' peices had my wifes initials scribed on them but it was never the norm for us to do this.

    I was thinking of starting to mark our pots from this year on as a few people have commented on the fact that we dont have a signature mark on the work. It seems that some folks like the idea of an identification mark on the pots.

    I was thinking of cutting the simple '2 letter' design in clay and taking a plaster cast of this as a try out.... but i guess that a plaster stamp wont last very long. Has anyone out there got a better idea ?.
    http://www.dosrodgerspottery.co.uk/

  • #2
    What about a simple metal design that can be 'stamped' onto the reverse of the creation? You could perhaps experiment with an old metal fork and heat it up and try and mould it?

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    • #3
      Why not try polymer clay?

      I use polymer clay with my ceramic work all the time, it makes great texture tools.
      Emma
      www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
      www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
      www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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      • #4
        Make your stamp out of clay and fire it.

        Make your stamp out of clay and fire it. It will last longer than plaster.
        www.toppotsupplies.co.uk

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        • #5
          At the moment I just sign the bases of my pots with a wooden kebab skewer! But in the past I have done what toppotter suggested, I made a stamp out of clay and bisque fired it. It worked really well and I keep promising myself to do it again one day but keep forgetting!

          Customers do like their pots signed though, so it's worth doing.
          Daesul

          http://www.clairemanwani.com
          http://www.folksy.com/shops/clairemanwani
          http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ClaireManwaniPottery

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          • #6
            We have a simple rubber stamp on a round wooden handle (just like you'd use with an ink pad) which we had made up to our own design at very little cost through a local stationery supply shop. We've been using it for about 20 years now and it hasn't worn out at all.
            Kate
            www.cuckoos-nest-fairs.co.uk

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            • #7
              The rubber stamp idea sounds good...thanks. Going to look into that tomorrow. If ours lasts 20 years it may well outlast our pottery needs !!!...well maybe not actually..
              It would be nice to think we will still be making pots in 20 years time.. but maybe not quite so many of them
              http://www.dosrodgerspottery.co.uk/

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              • #8
                A potters stamp

                Hi or hello,

                The idea of stamping handmade pots is a good one. I sometimes get people to come and ask where a pottery they have comes from. I usually have no idea! So I think it is better to 'sign' our work in some way.

                I used to roughly write out the name of the village where I have my pottery studio but it looked gross! So I eventually had a proper metal stamp made out to custom by a smith.

                I'd insert a photo here with pleasure but it seems you can't download one direct from your computer. Maybe I'll try with my flickr account. Wait there, I'll be back!

                f r a n k i e

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                • #9
                  No signature or stamp on your work for over 20 years! I think its important to leave something, even if its just initials. It makes your work more personalised and shows that it is handmade. Other people may want to find out where the work is from and won't find you if the work is not signed.

                  I write my name on the bottom of all of my pieces so that it can be read clearly. If you want to use a stamp, making one out of clay and then bisque firing would work best, as others have suggested. You could also make a long handle out of a sausage shape of clay to press the stamp into soft clay easily.

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                  • #10
                    A potter's stamp

                    That's it. I've found the way to share my photos here... but I'm not allowed to post links until I have 25 posts on my counter. So... I suggest you have a look at my flickr account on the set called 'berryhobby pottery workshop'... here's the address, but hush, fill in the gaps!

                    flickr.com/photos/frankieduberry

                    What do you think of that stamp? It cost me 100€ but it will last for a hundred years

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                    • #11
                      I will post the link for you

                      http://www.flickr.com/photos/frankieduberry/4416559129/

                      The stamped version does look more professional. Glad you found a resolution!

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