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  • Rough edges

    Hi all,

    I've just had my first go with PC, nothing fancy just mixed two contrasting colours together to make a marble effect then rolled it out & used cutters to cut out a few shapes, stuck a hole in the top & I thought I might use them as pendants. The only thing is after i got them out of the oven I noticed that some of the edges aren't as smooth as I'd like, obviously easy to solve before baking but I was wondering if there was something I could use afterwards to 'sand' them smooth?

    Cheers Guys

    Jules x
    http://www.beadsbyjules.co.uk
    Facebook fan page
    Art Fire

  • #2
    I use clay clay, not polymer, but what I find is that if you rub one rough edge against another they smooth each other down. Or you can use a carborundum stone or even just some sandpaper.
    Daesul

    http://www.clairemanwani.com
    http://www.folksy.com/shops/clairemanwani
    http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ClaireManwaniPottery

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    • #3
      Hi Jules

      Use some wet and dry sandpaper to sand the edges using water (with a spot of washing up liquid added) to cut down on the dust. Start with a course grain (300) and work up to a fine (1200) for a really good finish.

      When cutting the shapes if you put cling film over the clay before cutting you will achieve more of a bevelled edge to the pendants and won't have to sand so much.

      Liz
      LC's Beads
      http://www.freewebs.com/lcsbeads
      http://www.lcsbeads.folksy.com
      http://www.lcsbeads.misi.co.uk
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      • #4
        Wet 'n' dry is the best way to rub down polymer clay & will give a very good finish. Just be careful, on round beads, not to flat spot them.

        When I make some small charms using cutters I have the same thing happen. Sometimes I cannot be bothered going the full wet route & have successfully used my partners emery board to gently take rough edges off - doesn't produce too much dust.

        It was easier than trying to stick a small piece of wet 'n' dry to a thin bit of wood, which was my idea! My partner just passed over an old emery board! (I was going to insert a "roll eyes" smiley, but it's gone missing)
        Bev
        Tamar Leather Hand tooled leather gifts that last a lifetime

        Also find me on Facebook & Folksy

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        • #5
          As others have said, wet/dry sandpaper is what you need.

          I personally tend to start at a 600 grit - unless something is quite uneven, and I might use a lower grit paper. But I usually find it a waste of energy to start any lower than a 600 if the bead is quite smooth to begin with. You can risk gouging more marks in than out if you use paper that is too coarse I have found. Also I learned the hard way you don't need to spend that long on each grit. After a while, you are just making the bead *smaller*, not smoother!

          Certainly for taking rough edges off cut-out shapes, you probably only need a quick rub with some 600 grit.

          I actually think with this type of project, it is much easier to do this and smooth the edges after baking anyway.
          Emma
          www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
          www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
          www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bev478 View Post
            Wet 'n' dry is the best way to rub down polymer clay & will give a very good finish. Just be careful, on round beads, not to flat spot them.

            When I make some small charms using cutters I have the same thing happen. Sometimes I cannot be bothered going the full wet route & have successfully used my partners emery board to gently take rough edges off - doesn't produce too much dust.

            It was easier than trying to stick a small piece of wet 'n' dry to a thin bit of wood, which was my idea! My partner just passed over an old emery board! (I was going to insert a "roll eyes" smiley, but it's gone missing)
            I just fold a bit of wet/dry sandpaper up a few times. It usually has enough rigidity to support itself then and the folded edges are good for getting into nooks and crannies.

            Emma
            Emma
            www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
            www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
            www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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            • #7
              Oh sanding! Don't get me started. I normally start with 800 grit as long as the item isn't too rough (If it is, then I have to use about 600) and then go up to 1200 for a really smooth finish to get rid of the fine scratches. Then when I use my polishing wheel the clay shines up like glass!
              I do find is a chore though, to be honest, but I normally try to sand in front of the t.v. but then my husband and son complain that the scratching noise interferes with the programme!
              Jayne
              http://www.folksy.com/shops/Jaykay

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              • #8
                Yup - I don't know what I hate more. Sanding polymer clay or cleaning the bead release out of my lampwork glass beads.

                Nothing's ever easy it is! But I suppose it is the hard work that makes these things feel worthwhile!

                Emma
                Emma
                www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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                • #9
                  Well I hate cleaning bead release out so perhaps i'll find I hate the sanding too

                  Thanks for your help everyone, i'll give it a go & if the results are half decent I might even post a pic for you!

                  Jules x
                  http://www.beadsbyjules.co.uk
                  Facebook fan page
                  Art Fire

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                  • #10
                    Then when I use my polishing wheel the clay shines up like glass!
                    Can anyone recommend a good polishing wheel and where I can get it?

                    Many thanks,
                    Tekiegirl
                    --
                    ------------------
                    "We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master."
                    Ernest Hemingway

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ejralph View Post
                      Yup - I don't know what I hate more. Sanding polymer clay or cleaning the bead release out of my lampwork glass beads.

                      Nothing's ever easy it is! But I suppose it is the hard work that makes these things feel worthwhile!

                      Emma
                      I hate cleaning my pasta maker and having to re align the plates every so often, sooooo boring.

                      Caroline
                      silver jewellery at The Silver Jewellery Workshop
                      bespoke handmade jewellery
                      Silver Jewellery blog
                      Handmade Jewellery Blog

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                      • #12
                        Lol - that is a sucky job isnt it. I did it once. Never bothered again - one of those life-too-short things for me I think.
                        Emma
                        www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                        www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                        www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ok,

                          So here's another question for you...

                          Can I stick a ball of fimo onto a mandrel & put it in one of my bead presses to shape it?

                          Or rather if I do what should I know about first.

                          Cheers
                          Jules x
                          http://www.beadsbyjules.co.uk
                          Facebook fan page
                          Art Fire

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BeadsbyJules View Post
                            Ok,

                            So here's another question for you...

                            Can I stick a ball of fimo onto a mandrel & put it in one of my bead presses to shape it?

                            Or rather if I do what should I know about first.

                            Cheers
                            Jules x
                            I've always wondered this too, so I'd love to know the answer
                            ContinuumDesigns- artisan polymer clay beads for one-of-a-kind designs.

                            The FHFTeam - featuring glass, jewellery and art handmade in the UK.

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                            • #15
                              In reply to Tekiegirl - I found a small bench grinder in the bargain bin at B&Q and then I put on a felt polishing wheel that I bought for a few pounds on Ebay and "hey presto" - it's the best polisher in the world.
                              You have to make sure that you hold your item at the bottom of the wheel though so that if the bead flies out of your hand (which happens ALL the time!) then it will get flung away from you and not in your face.
                              Jayne
                              http://www.folksy.com/shops/Jaykay

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