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  • New to polymer help please

    Hi
    I have just become interested in polymer and i'm doing as much research about it as I can, looking at websites (some of you have great sites) and reading books. The array of equipment that some say you need others say not, is hughe, though I found the thread on hear great reading.

    There is one thing i'm not sure about is the oven to bake it in as everthing i've read talks about electric ovens and table top ovens. I don't want to go to the expense of a table top until I know it's what I really want to pursue. The thing is in my kitchen I have a Range cooker with two ovens, one of which I rarely ever use, and it's gas. Is it ok to use gas cookers when using polymer or do I have to use electric.
    Thanks in anticipation
    fab

  • #2
    I have a gas cooker, and it works fine for me, I don't really have any tools either I just use my bear hands and occasionally a cocktail stick, it depends what your planning on making though, I just make little animal charms not beads
    Hayley x


    My Blog: http://owllovespanda.blogspot.com/

    Twitter: http://twitter.com/owllovespanda

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    • #3
      I just have a normal el-cheapo gas oven and it works fine - as long as you have it at the correct temperature. You don't need fancy tools either. I make beads and all I use is a cocktail stick and a dedicated baking sheet that I got from the pound shop. Good luck with your projects - you will soon be addicted like the rest of us!
      Jayne
      http://www.folksy.com/shops/Jaykay

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      • #4
        I have an electric fan oven and it works just fine on beads. Although it says put in for 30 mins I only do about 25 as it is a fan oven.

        Shary
        x
        My cardmaking blog

        The other side of me

        My new beading blog

        So many beads , not enough cash

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        • #5
          as others have said, gas ovens are fine.

          The only thing is, you need to be able to control the temperature so that it stays at the right baking temp for the clay.

          And obviously, this is far easier to do with electric ovens.

          I would invest in an oven thermometer - find out what setting on your oven gives a stable temperature in the right range.

          That way, you won't risk overheating and burning your clay creations, or risk under-heating them so they don't harden properly.

          Out of interest, everyone who is using a gas oven, would you mind posting what gas mark you use and any other tips you have for gas oven baking?

          Nothing beats real experience and it has been several years since I was regularly using a gas oven for my clay so I have forgotten the ins and outs.
          Emma
          www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
          www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
          www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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          • #6
            gas ovens for fimo

            hi i use a gas oven best temp is 1/2 gas mark for me but ovens vary so its a bit trial and error. Think its a bit better to undercook than overcook as at least then you can pop it back in for 10 mins or so xxx
            Bubbleicious http://www.fimo-heaven.com
            Folksy Shop http://www.folksy.com/shops/SweetFimoHeaven
            Twitter http://twitter.com/#!/fimo_heaven
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            • #7
              I am also thinking about having a go with polymer can I just use my ordinary oven? If so are there any precautions to take when cooking food in it later?
              Thanks I hope its not too silly a question!!!!!
              Janice Phoenixjewellery from

              http://www.phoenixfabrics.co.uk
              http://phoenixjewellery.blogspot.com/
              http://phoenixbridal.blogspot.com/
              http://bernie-bear.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                thanks for all your wonderfull replys. As for addicted I think I am getting there as I'm getting bits and pieces together, the more I read the more I want to do it.
                Big thankyou

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Phoenixjewellery View Post
                  I am also thinking about having a go with polymer can I just use my ordinary oven? If so are there any precautions to take when cooking food in it later?
                  Thanks I hope its not too silly a question!!!!!
                  Not a silly question at all!

                  Yes, you can use your home oven - that is exactly how the product is designed to be used.

                  The only precaution really is that you don't allow the clay to burn and you don't ever cook food and clay in the oven at the same time together!

                  To expand a little on the subject of baking ....

                  Some people don't feel comfortable baking the clay in their kitchen oven - which is of course their perogative. And they will either cover the clay with a foil tent or use a separate mini oven. So those options are also open to you if you don't feel comfortable using your kitchen oven.

                  You will read stuff online about how the clay leaves a "residue" in the oven etc. All I can say is that in 20 plus years of using polymer clay, I have never seen this. I honestly think it is an urban myth and cannot recall anyone ever being able to show me evidence of this fabled residue when pressed for proof!

                  My own feeling is that really, the residues left oven from oven cleaners and the like are a far bigger risk when it comes to contaminating our food. But I am no scientist and none of us knows what they will discover down the line. So if you prefer not to bake in your kitchen oven, then don't. Just be aware that there are a lot of chinese whispers when it comes to baking and currently I am aware of no factual evidence against using the product exactly as the manufacturers intend.

                  Emma
                  Emma
                  www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                  www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                  www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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                  • #10
                    I use electrical kitchen oven. After use for fimo, I clean it. Always put an aluminum foil between fimo object and tray.

                    And, I made some simple tool for bake beads. I hope it will be helpful.

                    I am inviting you for a cup of coffee, http://nihalerpeden.blogspot.com
                    My Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/DONDURMA?ref=si_shop

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the advice I am going to give it a go.
                      Janice Phoenixjewellery from

                      http://www.phoenixfabrics.co.uk
                      http://phoenixjewellery.blogspot.com/
                      http://phoenixbridal.blogspot.com/
                      http://bernie-bear.blogspot.com

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                      • #12
                        Just wanted to say thanks for this thread, I am interested in making my own fimo beads but don't know where to start and the whole baking thing worried me slightly but this has put my mind at ease some what.

                        Apologies if this is a silly question but erj you mentioned a foil tent? over the beads is this literally as it sounds i.e. wrap the beads in foil but not tightly... if that makes sense?

                        Also people mentioned what gas mark to use but what about eletric what is best or does it depend on the fimo? actually while I'm asking questions (sorry thought this would be a quick reply but brain is now thinking!) what is the difference between fimo and sculpey?

                        Thanks.x
                        Zoe

                        www,zrjewellery-facebook.co.uk
                        zrjewellery@hotmail.co.uk

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by InspiredDesigns View Post
                          Just wanted to say thanks for this thread, I am interested in making my own fimo beads but don't know where to start and the whole baking thing worried me slightly but this has put my mind at ease some what.

                          Apologies if this is a silly question but erj you mentioned a foil tent? over the beads is this literally as it sounds i.e. wrap the beads in foil but not tightly... if that makes sense?

                          Also people mentioned what gas mark to use but what about eletric what is best or does it depend on the fimo? actually while I'm asking questions (sorry thought this would be a quick reply but brain is now thinking!) what is the difference between fimo and sculpey?

                          Thanks.x
                          There is no difference between Fimo and Sculpey. These are different marks of polymer clay. You can use them together.
                          I am inviting you for a cup of coffee, http://nihalerpeden.blogspot.com
                          My Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/DONDURMA?ref=si_shop

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Is it better to use Fimo soft of the classic and whats the difference please
                            Janice Phoenixjewellery from

                            http://www.phoenixfabrics.co.uk
                            http://phoenixjewellery.blogspot.com/
                            http://phoenixbridal.blogspot.com/
                            http://bernie-bear.blogspot.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm no expert but basically Fimo Soft is, as the name suggests, a fairly soft, malleable clay. Fimo Classic is nearer to the original recipe & is slightly firmer. It can take slightly longer to condition the Classic, but will not get so "sticky" with handling. This means that Classic may be easier to use for canes & detailed work. Fimo Soft comes in slightly brighter colours.
                              Last edited by Bev478; 02-03-2010, 10:38 PM.
                              Bev
                              Tamar Leather Hand tooled leather gifts that last a lifetime

                              Also find me on Facebook & Folksy

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