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How can I take good pictures of my bag charms/jewellery?

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  • How can I take good pictures of my bag charms/jewellery?

    Please could someone give me advice on taking good pictures of jewellery/crafts. I have played around with the settings of my digital camera, read the instructions, and yet I still get the background of my photos looking a dirty grey rather than a nice white. I take photos of my work on a wooden board so that the pics look better (although I am not sure they do...what do you think ...please look at my album).

    I use to take photos of my stuff on a white sheet of card in my conservatory which is always bright (if not always sunny). Where am I going wrong?

    Any advice would be a real help.
    Website: www.madison-mae.co.uk
    Facebook: http://www.new.facebook.com/home.php...3654680?ref=ts
    My Blog: http://madison-mae.blogspot.com/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/MadisonMaeUK
    Misi: http://madisonmae.misi.co.uk
    Wowthankyou.com http://www.wowthankyou.co.uk/store/s...p?secondary=76

  • #2
    Hiya

    Pictures are a nightmare to take some times but hang in there. You are doing the right thing with trying all the setting on your camera. Depends on which camera you have tho. Sometimes a filter can really help with pictures and make them look a lot better. On the camera i use (although im still pretty rubbish at taking certain pictures) i use a UV filter and set the camera setting to auto focus although i can still zoom in as much as i like. I also set it to "N" havent a clue what "N" means tho but it produces some better pics.

    I think that when u take a picture its best to try and keep the flash off as anything that is reflective is gonna shine up too much. Like you said natural light from your conservatory is where to go!

    You can also try out different backgrounds. If you have a nice material you can try putting your stuff on that and see how it looks.

    For my crafts i take pictures of wood. They usually come out alright. Its when i have varnished stuff that i run into problems with replections caused by too much light or the flash when i forget to take it off.

    Sometimes i have to wait for a real nice day and just go mad with the camera. Ive always been meaning to try different sources of light to get good pictures, perhaps thats your solution - i dunno.

    I hope this helps

    Cheers
    Dave
    www.woodadoodle.co.uk

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    • #3
      I get my DH to take mine. I use a variety of backgrounds; slate, wooden bowl, velvet etc. If you are taking close ups use the 'macro' feature on your camera
      Bedecked Beads-Handcrafted Jewellery from Scotland

      http://www.facebook.com/bedeckedbeads

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      • #4
        Someone on a recent thread here said they put thier jewellery in a white bath to photograph, and it works a treat. I haven't tried it myself, as my bath unfortunately isn't white
        Celia
        I can't be creative and tidy too
        www.jencel.co.uk for beads, findings and threads
        The Occasional Sheffield Bead Shop
        Jencel on Facebook

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        • #5
          Not that I make jewellery or anything like that but when needing to take photo's of some products for my store I use a lightbox.

          It is basically a big white tent thing which is all enclosed like a cube, there is a slot to put your camera in to take the picture. What it does is diffuses all of teh light to give an even looking picture.

          Or that is what it is supposed to do but my camera is rubbish.

          I got it from Ebay if that helps
          I Love Handcrafted

          Handmade Marketplace for the UK - Coming Soon

          Join us on Facebook! I love Handcrafted

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          • #6
            Thank you all for your advice. I shall give some of your ideas a go. Quite curious to see how the photos look in the bath (once I've given it a good scub first tho)
            Website: www.madison-mae.co.uk
            Facebook: http://www.new.facebook.com/home.php...3654680?ref=ts
            My Blog: http://madison-mae.blogspot.com/
            Twitter: http://twitter.com/MadisonMaeUK
            Misi: http://madisonmae.misi.co.uk
            Wowthankyou.com http://www.wowthankyou.co.uk/store/s...p?secondary=76

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            • #7
              Hi

              Another couple of things you could try are the following.

              1. Get some silver foil and wrap around a tea tray or something similar. Place this to the side of the item so that any light coming in from the window is reflected back onto your item.

              2. Cable release and tripod. If you spot on, non blurred images a tripod is essential or a bean bag will do. If you havent got a cable release, use the self timer so that you are not pressing the shutter (the pressure from your finger can cause the camera to shake just enough to spoil a perfectly sharp photo)

              3. Like someone said above use macro if you can. If not use the zoom, can work just as well.

              4. White Balance - Your camera will most probably have different settings for White Balance and it is usually set to Auto, you mentioned a greyish background. Maybe try the different settings on offer, you may well find that one like flourescent or sunny setting may do the trick? Not tried myself to be honest

              5. Dont use flash, unless you can bounce it off a reflector and onto your subject.

              Hope this may help a little.

              Rob
              Web: www.randmphotography.com
              Twitter: www.twitter.com/dolts007

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dolts007 View Post
                Hi

                Another couple of things you could try are the following.

                1. Get some silver foil and wrap around a tea tray or something similar. Place this to the side of the item so that any light coming in from the window is reflected back onto your item.

                2. Cable release and tripod. If you spot on, non blurred images a tripod is essential or a bean bag will do. If you havent got a cable release, use the self timer so that you are not pressing the shutter (the pressure from your finger can cause the camera to shake just enough to spoil a perfectly sharp photo)

                3. Like someone said above use macro if you can. If not use the zoom, can work just as well.

                4. White Balance - Your camera will most probably have different settings for White Balance and it is usually set to Auto, you mentioned a greyish background. Maybe try the different settings on offer, you may well find that one like flourescent or sunny setting may do the trick? Not tried myself to be honest

                5. Dont use flash, unless you can bounce it off a reflector and onto your subject.

                Hope this may help a little.

                Rob
                Your Grey problem is the exposure, the camera will meter the white and try to make it 18% grey which is half way between pure black and pure white, thus making the camera think that is the perfect exposure, one way round it would be to chose a different back drop, otherwise things such as exposing for a more neutral scene eg something grey or something with a range of shadows and highlights and locking your exposure- depending on you camera and its complexity it might not be possible. if you have photoshop there are cut-out methods and plug-ins which will allow you to use a diff colour backdrop and replace it with white.


                the white balance will only put a colour cast on the image and will not rectify the exposure

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