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  • Paintbrush help needed

    OK so before I got into crafts I thought one paintbrush was much the same as another, how wrong I was.
    I paint wooden items using mainly acrylic paints and despite ordering numerous ones off the internet I can't seem to find any that i'm comfortable with. They're either too soft or too stiff.
    I have three main brushes that I use which are just fantastic but the problem is they came as part of a kids painting set! They won't last forever and having only three brushes means I am slowed down an awful lot washing and drying them so often.
    What brushes do you recommend for painting wood with acrylics? I don't have a shop near me that sells them so I can't go and compare them before buying. I think what i'm looking for is something similar to the sable ones but a little harder if that makes sense?
    Please help!
    Facebook page: www.facebook.com/jamdalory
    My blog: http://jamdalory.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    Hogs hair or bristle brushes are harder than sable, and sometimes cheaper too. Synthetic ones come in all sorts of hardnesses, sadly there's really no way of knowing how they'll work for you without having them physically there to compare like for like, but for cheap, rough paintbrushes, you can't beat the ones the Works sell, so if there's one within a reasonable distance, pop into your local branch and look in their art section. They've started doing crafty bits for card making too, not much but it's a start.
    Once you've found some "proper" brushes you like, before using them, write down the brand, size and brush type, then you'll be able to source it better online.
    www.darkflightsart.co.uk

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dark-...63232150439256

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    • #3
      My favourite brushes (and I do the same as you mainly, painting acrylic on wood) are the golden synthetic brushes from Rosemary & Co, here: https://www.rosemaryandco.com/index....ls57tdh47b0pr1

      I can certainly recommend the company too: the brushes are handmade, a good price and delivery is quick. There's a brush shaped for every type of painting you're likely to do. Buy a few and do some experimenting.
      digital stamps for cardmakers: http://www.handmadeharbour.co.uk
      blog: http://handmadeharbour.blogspot.com
      hand painted personalised plaques, clocks, canvases, etc: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk
      blog: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk/blog

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      • #4
        Thank you both for your replies, I have ordered one of the catalogues from Rosemary and co as there's far too many on the website for me to get my head round! I managed to find a little back street art shop today where I picked up a couple of brushes, now I know what the proper sizes are that I need I shall order some from that website when the catalogue arrives. You've both been very helpful so thank you.
        Facebook page: www.facebook.com/jamdalory
        My blog: http://jamdalory.blogspot.com/

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        • #5
          Also, you can get some surprisingly good quality cheap brushes at The Works. I have bought brushes there for varnishing because they are cheap and can be thrown away, but many of them have ended up amongst my good brushes.
          Karin

          If I ain't on here, I'm crafting


          http://mariasramblings-mariaz.blogspot.co.uk/

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          • #6
            I dont think I have one of them shops near me. The brushes i've just got are 'Pro-Arte' apparently thats a good make and they seem to be working well but they're a bit expensive in the shop so i'll be looking online either for their brushes or for some of the handmade ones that Wendy recommended.
            Facebook page: www.facebook.com/jamdalory
            My blog: http://jamdalory.blogspot.com/

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            • #7
              I found that The Works can be contacted online to tell you your nearest shop if you need it JJ; ....it might be of some help alongside what others have suggested here as well.
              Sorry I cannot post the link for you.
              Karin

              If I ain't on here, I'm crafting


              http://mariasramblings-mariaz.blogspot.co.uk/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DarkFlights View Post
                Hogs hair or bristle brushes are harder than sable, and sometimes cheaper too. Synthetic ones come in all sorts of hardnesses, sadly there's really no way of knowing how they'll work for you without having them physically there to compare like for like, but for cheap, rough paintbrushes, you can't beat the ones the Works sell, so if there's one within a reasonable distance, pop into your local branch and look in their art section. They've started doing crafty bits for card making too, not much but it's a start.
                Once you've found some "proper" brushes you like, before using them, write down the brand, size and brush type, then you'll be able to source it better online.
                I agree that the only way to find the one that suits you best is by trying each and every one of them. Of course using other people's experience might also work but in the end you're gonna have to try it yourself

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                • #9
                  There is a trade show Craft, Hobby and Stitch International at the NEC 19-21st February. There are usually a few brush manufacturers at the show and they often give out samples. If you are selling your crafts, why not visit the show and spend the day trying out brushes ... and collecting FREE samples?

                  Also, I wrote an article for our website... do these extracts help:

                  ... There are different brush handle styles (soft grip, triangular, wood or acrylic) and an assortment of brush hair (squirrel, camel, sable, fitch, taklon and nylon).
                  Brush Uses:
                  •Fan brushes are great for applying a good amount of colour or glaze, for blending colours and for stippling and graining effects.
                  •Flat and shader brushes are good for design work. A flat paint brush provides lots of colour capacity and easy manoeuvrability. Used for bold, sweeping strokes, or on edge for fine lines.
                  •Liner brushes are good for lines, outlining, detail and precision work.
                  •Mop brushes are good for banding, applying glaze and/or good amounts of colour.
                  •Round brushes are a versatile brush suitable for most design work and painting

                  Top Tips:
                  •No matter what quality of brush you acquire it is very important to look after them as carefully as you can. Wash them out after use with a gentle detergent and stand them on their handles, not on their brush heads.
                  •Clean the brushes in a spe******t cleaning product from time to time to remove paint from the ferrules (brush joint).

                  Good luck.
                  COUNTRY LOVE CRAFTS - 01235 861700
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