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Wool / Yarn query

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  • Wool / Yarn query

    I can't knot and I can't crochet (shock horror) so it's not often that I venture in here ..... although I do admire all your creations!
    I am currently going through the process of CE certification and am making rag dolls. A lot of people are now using felt for the hair to go through the necessary hoops easily, but I love the traditional look of the wool hair and I believe it is possible after speaking to the testing labs.
    Now this is where I become confused.
    DK, chunky, aran, 2ply, 4ply etc. can you please put the wool thickness's in order for me please so that I can begin to make head or tail of it all.
    Thank you to you lovely woolly ladies.
    full time mum and very very part time crafter.

  • #2
    Chunky, arran, (Not absolutely sure about those two but I think thats right) DK is Double Knitting, 4 ply, 3 ply, 2 ply.
    Carol
    God helps them that help themselves.

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    • #3
      Thank you.

      Now for the next question

      what is the difference between wool and acrylic as far a properties like strgnth and stretch etc goes?
      full time mum and very very part time crafter.

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      • #4
        Pass.........
        Carol
        God helps them that help themselves.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Critchley View Post
          Pass.........
          Same answer as I got!
          full time mum and very very part time crafter.

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          • #6
            To be honest it is such a wide field of variety I don't think there is a definitive answer except on the whole acrylics are stronger and longer lasting but not so nice to the feel.
            Carol
            God helps them that help themselves.

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            • #7
              Wool is from a sheep

              Acrylic is a manmade(synthetic) yarn.

              Then there's yarn made from cotton, bamboo, and other animal hair.

              Then there are also loads and loads of differnt blends of all these but their individaul percentage will be state on the yarn label.

              Each washes differently, each burns differently ie some faster than others, some ie most of the synthetic ones when burnt will melt a wee bit.


              Some people are allegic to real wool like myself and a lot of babies due to their delicate skin.


              Some yarns and blends of yarn can fray easily btw
              So many projects, so little time

              http://folksy.com/shops/eileenscraftstudio

              http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fol...92535377497013

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              • #8
                You may want to go into a wool shop so you can actually fondle the yarns, I've sometimes found that some of the blends can vary quite widely in softness and scratchiness, so that will then depend on what you want for you rag dolls. I've never seen rag dolls with felt. That just sounds a bit odd.

                I just found this nice journal article about yarn strength. It's probably a bit too technical in how to predict such things http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ame/2010/640103/

                I do find sirdar big softee to not be very strong though - it can pull apart quite easily (even by a 2 year old, it's been tested on mine!)
                View my flickr

                'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

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                • #9
                  Acrylic yarns can be extremely soft and feel much nicer to the touch than some wool yarns.
                  So many projects, so little time

                  http://folksy.com/shops/eileenscraftstudio

                  http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fol...92535377497013

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                  • #10
                    Right back to absolute basics... the ply is the number of strands in the yarn.

                    2 ply - very sknny great for lace patterns
                    3 ply - very common post war as it went further during rationing, now used in socks
                    4 ply - tended to be used for babies matinee jackets

                    All of the above are knitted on fine needles.

                    DK - this has become more popular as it knits up very quickly and is what the majority on hand knitted garments are made from.

                    Aran - used for heavier working sweaters as it shows off textured work like cables really well... true Aran is rather itchy!

                    Chunky - This is really a new variety of wool... when I learnt to knit it would be so rare to go above a 4.5mm needle.

                    Super chunky - lives up to its name and worked in mega needles

                    Acrylic on its own is the strongest, but wool is not that far behind, however the real strength lies in the twist as the tighter the twist the stronger and stiffer the yarn.

                    For dolls hair use a DK and you will not go far wrong, easy to manipulate and it looks good.
                    Blog: http://rosmademe.blogspot.com

                    Website: www.etsy.com/shop/RosMadeMe

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                    • #11
                      I agree about acrylic being softer than pure wool, although I buy Merino Wool which has been treated to be less irritating to the skin.

                      Another important difference is the price. The Merino Wool I buy is around £3 for 50g, whereas acrylic is far cheaper so ideal for crafting.

                      Marion

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aisles View Post
                        Wool is from a sheep
                        And other species such as goats, alpaca, vicuna, camel etc.....
                        View my flickr

                        'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

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                        • #13
                          Techincially wool only comes from the fleece of sheep.
                          So many projects, so little time

                          http://folksy.com/shops/eileenscraftstudio

                          http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fol...92535377497013

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                          • #14
                            Brilliant.
                            Thank you for all your answers.

                            I can't knot and I can't crochet (shock horror) so it's not often that I venture in here ..... although I do admire all your creations!
                            I should probably clarify that actually I can knot, but cannot knit
                            full time mum and very very part time crafter.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by aisles View Post
                              Techincially wool only comes from the fleece of sheep.
                              Cambridge dictionary definition of wool:
                              wool noun /wʊl/


                              /wʊl/
                              Definition



                              the soft, thick hair which grows on the bodies of sheep and some other animals

                              And the OED says:

                              Definition of wool
                              noun

                              [mass noun]
                              • 1the fine, soft curly or wavy hair forming the coat of a sheep, goat, or similar animal, especially when shorn and prepared for use in making cloth or yarn:
                              View my flickr

                              'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

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