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Have I found the right tutorial on you tube?

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  • Have I found the right tutorial on you tube?

    I have a knitting pattern that says "knit into st on row below"

    I have been looking on youtube and just want to double check that this is the right technique for this instruction before ploughing on!!

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    'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

  • #2
    Yes, that is exactly what I would do after reading that instruction. You are advancing in leaps and bounds. Good for you.
    Carol
    God helps them that help themselves.

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    • #3
      Yes this is the right technique, however she is using a continental technique to wind the wool around the needle (ie using her left hand) rather than using the English knitting system feeding the yarn through your right hand.
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      • #4
        irrespective of which hand I use to hold the wool I'm winding round the needle, I guess it makes no difference to the actual direction of wool winding.

        Good thing this you tube, I'd be completely at a loss with a lot of this knitting lark. It's always so much easier when you can see it being done than reading a long winded instruction, or even seeing picture instructions in a book or magazine.
        View my flickr

        'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

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        • #5
          So she is. I never noticed that. Doesnt it look odd. lol.
          Carol
          God helps them that help themselves.

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          • #6
            Wait....she's left-handed, right? She's reaching over with her left hand to get the yarn to wrap...

            Okay, I have been watching some You Tube videos of continental style knitting - my head is spinning...I'm weaving around the room....my brow is knitted, and i need a purl of wisdom.

            I'm a thrower. I still do exactly what my left-handed mother showed me to do when I was little. I have tried continental in years past, but I can't seem to get going with it, though it DOES look so much more graceful. I am going to keep trying. Ya' gotta learn new ways to do things to keep your brain oiled. Off i go...
            Last edited by removed10; 05-08-2011, 01:18 AM.

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            • #7
              Oooooo I never knew there was a difference! I knit the English way, I suppose because I was taught by my English grandma. My French grandma taught me to sew. Is there an English and Continental way of sewing?

              The historial researcher in me is asking why is there a difference? Are we knitting like Vikings? And the conitnenals knitting like an Egyptian? I'm just off to add a few drops of oil to a couple of brain cells by asking my friend who has an ology in the history of knitting. Honestly. She really does!

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              • #8
                Cosmic - could we trace our ancestry by the way we knit???????????? I'm assuming your folk weren't native Americans..... so your right handed thread looping would indicate they were Northern European.........

                Hang on. I'm jumping to conclusions too quickly. We need an indepth survey of which hand the Danes, Swedes and Norwegians use. We need a world map of knitting hands.

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                • #9
                  My friends grandma who is incredibly English (no other ancestry in her line) knits "the continental way" to be honest, that "continental way" is the way I have always seen old grannies knitting in the UK. Maybe it's just that people find it more difficult to get the hang of and as long as they can knit somehow style of holding yarn isn't so important, whereas the French do tend to be a bit more picky that things should be done properly.
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                  'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

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                  • #10
                    I really don't know what 'ental' (continental or oriental) I use but I put the yarn over the needle with my right index finger and I was taught by my Granny who was very English as far as I know.
                    Carol
                    God helps them that help themselves.

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                    • #11
                      Here you go from Beth with a PHd (or was it a Masters?) in knitting:
                      Dear Annie,
                      now that is a poser that cannot be answered by study of the surviving artefacts, as they give no indication of how the yarn was held. The only give-away is pictures or descriptions of knitting with a needle support - sheath/stick/belt, but even that isn’t definitive as it is possible to use it to support either the working or the holding needle.
                      There may be clues – I suspect that using five needles rather than four for rounds goes with left-hand throw, and there are ways of working that may be technically simpler one way or the other. All Shetland lace is right-hand, but some Shetland knitters do right and left for colour work, whereas Binge knitters in Halland usually keep both colours in the right hand, as with twined (two-end) knitting from which it may derive. Presumably the twisted stitches of German stockings were done with the yarn in the left hand? Most of Europe regards the left-handed throw as ‘German’, and certainly it was introduced into Scandinavia by well-meaning middle-class school teachers (my source for this is a museum curator in Halland, a Swedish knitting hotspot). It is often said to be quicker, but I like it because I never mastered the thing my grandmother did with her middle finger. I learned it from a friend whose knitting granny was Sudeten Czech, and therefore from a ‘German’ culture zone.
                      Hope this helps. Beth.

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                      • #12
                        Gosh - that looks a strange way of knitting. I was taught by my dutch mother and we both knit with the yarn in our right hand ... might have a go at having the yarn in the left just out of interest.
                        I would definately say that the video does show what your pattern described. Just for info - there is a k1, p1 rib where you knit into the stitch below and that's called 'Fisherman's rib' - imagine the thick jumpers that the fisherman wear and that gives you an idea how the pattern would look.

                        Good luck with your pattern
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                        • #13
                          That's what I'm doing! P1, *knit into st on row below, p1, rep from * to end. Jolly good. About to try it out!
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                          'I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.' - Jane Austen

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