Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

knitting socks

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • removed10
    replied
    This is an intriguing sock pattern! It doesn't appear to be simply a tube type sock...the heel looks turned. I'm really tempted to buy the pattern....

    http://www.interweavestore.com/Knitt...ml?a=kp090723b

    Leave a comment:


  • removed10
    replied
    Okay, so make a little video....put it on YouTube...then on here! =D

    Leave a comment:


  • AnnieAnna
    replied
    I love your mum, Dagna. I was thinking of knitting a double woolen layer toe and heel but use something tougher - it's genious.

    I do the slipping stitches thing as I knit. I usually do two. I can't remember what I do now but if you keep moving onto the new needle in the same place every time you can get a vertical, loopy, lose line in your knitting. I remember - I pick up two knitted stitches on the spare free needle then knit what's on the next needle. It makes the knitting very even....no nasty loopy holes.

    Don't you feel knitting is easier to explain by going look I'll show you, rather than trying to use words?

    Leave a comment:


  • removed10
    replied
    Originally posted by Dagna View Post
    Meant to answer two at once and forgot - you don't keep the extra stitches on the needle - you slip them onto the next one, and carry on casting on from there, so you get the right number of stitches and miss the awkward bit where you are casting on to an empty needle.(So if you need 72 stitches on each needle, you cast 76 onto needle one, slip the last four onto needle two, carry on and do a total of 76 on that, slip the last for onto needle three, and then carry on to 72 on needle three. Same number of stitches, but without a fiddle at the start of the needle.)
    I think I see...going to "fiddle" with it now....

    Leave a comment:


  • removed10
    replied
    Originally posted by Dagna View Post
    My Mum told me to knit linen thread in with the wool - then you get a linen toe or heel when the wool wears out (and you can darn onto it as a base). (My Mum is much better at knitting than I am, and much faster.)
    Gee, your mom is smart!! What a great idea!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Carie
    replied
    Aw thanks Tarina

    Leave a comment:


  • Carie
    replied
    Thanks but Im bad enough with straight pins at the moment

    Leave a comment:


  • Dagna
    replied
    Meant to answer two at once and forgot - you don't keep the extra stitches on the needle - you slip them onto the next one, and carry on casting on from there, so you get the right number of stitches and miss the awkward bit where you are casting on to an empty needle.(So if you need 72 stitches on each needle, you cast 76 onto needle one, slip the last four onto needle two, carry on and do a total of 76 on that, slip the last for onto needle three, and then carry on to 72 on needle three. Same number of stitches, but without a fiddle at the start of the needle.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Dagna
    replied
    My Mum told me to knit linen thread in with the wool - then you get a linen toe or heel when the wool wears out (and you can darn onto it as a base). (My Mum is much better at knitting than I am, and much faster.)

    Leave a comment:


  • removed10
    replied
    Okay, I am confused abou casting on four or more stitches...except for the last needle. Doesn't that mess it up when it comes time to do the heel turning?

    Leave a comment:


  • AnnieAnna
    replied
    Wow! That's brill. I go wobbly at the thought of turning heels but when I actually do it, you are quite right, it's pretty obvious what to do.

    Now, can you solve this problem? I have some I can't part with: llama wool socks that went up a vocano, the first Tudor stockings I knit myself (really fine 2 ply wool) and gorgeous russet coloured Tudor stockings knitted on a 100 year old stocking machine. They've all got holes where the toes and heels should be. I know I should sit there repairing that lot but is there a sectret to reinforcing heels and toes right at the begining?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dagna
    replied
    I have knitted loads of socks over the years - I used to commute to London, an hour and a half each way on the train - and I have done both four and two needle types. But I stopped doing the two needle ones very early, when my Dad said that they were nowhere near as comfortable to wear, as the seam runs along under your foot. So I would recommend four needles (which also have the advantage that they don't take up much space, and since the 'rows' (stitches on each needle) are much shorter, you can always carry on and then just finish the one you are on, and then roll it up and stick it in your bag.




    Some things I worked out by trial and error (and asking my Mum):
    • When casting on, do about four or more stiches than you need on all but the last needle. Then transfer them over to the next one, as the first however many on that one.
    • Like Susan said - when you have cast on and are about to join it into a circle, line it all up and make sure there are no twists. I lay the whole thing out flat, and make sure the row hasn't twisted between needles. Then pick it up, check again, and do the first needle, then check again. And if there is a twist between the needles, you can either unpick back to the join, or just be ruthless and knit straight over it and have a little twist in the top. Which helps to prove that they are hand made. (My excuse for most mistakes I make when knitting.)
    • Heels aren't that hard, they just have a huge mystique to people who have never done them. Just follow the pattern, and do them in one go (so do it when you have time to do the whole heel without interruptions) for the first few. I was on the train once, got out my knitting, and the city gent sitting opposite me said 'Are you knitting socks?' Then when I said yes, said 'Are you going to be turning the heel? May I watch?' It's a funny way to spread happiness, but I turned the heel and explained what I was doing, and he thanked me profusely when we got to his station!
    • Heels are worked by knitting a strip on one of the needles (the 'middle' one of the round, so you are working on two needles only at that point), then when the strip is long enough, you pick up stitches all down the side of it, knit the rest of the way round to the other side, and pick up some more stiches , then carry on along the strip you just did, and you have turned the heel and joined the group of stunningly impressive people who know how to do that. Then when people say 'did you turn the heel yourself' you say 'yes - it wasn't hard' and they are very impressed and only you know just how truthful you are being... (It is very easy once you do it).
    • There are two ways of finishing the sock. One is to cast off and sew up the toe, the other is to 'graft' it, which is a sort of knit it together with a darning needle finish, and makes a very smooth toe. I always graft them, and I ALWAYS have to get the instructions out and follow them! Once I have done the first three or so stitches, it is easy - but remembering what order you keep on and slip off and so on needs writeen instructions! But it leaves you with a smooth toe that fits together beautifully, with no lines or seams to catch the toes.
    • For the first few pairs, don't do any fancy cables or patterns - I found that anything more complicated than a ribbed top was too much until I got the hang of them.
    • If sticking your knitting into a bag, watch out that you don't push the needles out of the knitting - the downside of needles with a point at each end is that the knitting can come off each end...
    Patons do a 'sock book' (large booklet) with a selection of patterns in it, including stockings for wearing with kilts (you are in Scotland, and once people find out you can do socks in the round, they will want those - but be warned, they can seem like the legs go on for ever!) It has a brown cover, and it has been available for donkey's years, and is the one I mostly use. I would be surprised if any knitting shop that sells patterns doesn't have it in stock.

    And finally - I like knitting socks. They are fairly quick, easy to do, and you feel very clever with four needles going.

    Good luck, and have fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarinab
    replied
    Try this pattern if you are new to socks. Sirdar 9135 not only does it have socks it has wristwarmers and legwarmers too, all knitted on 2 needles. Easy instructions for turning the heel and its double knit so they grow fast!!
    Tarina

    Leave a comment:


  • removed10
    replied
    Ah yes, circular needles. I personally found it awkward to turn heels on circ needles, but that's just me...I'm...different...get stuck thinking a certain way. Also, I learned on four dp needles and so I have trouble shifting to some other way. =P

    Leave a comment:


  • AnnieAnna
    replied
    Probably. It's like a bit of thick bendy plastic not thread/not cord/not tube (maybe it's thin tube?) with like half a knitting needle, the pointy half, stuck on each end.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X