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  • Shrink plastic jewellery

    Hi everyone! I'm new to the site and I was just wondering if anyone had any suggestions for sealing shrink plastic jewellery?

    Thanks
    kiran

  • #2
    You can make custom buttons with shrink film, perfect for when you can’t find the right button you need to finish a project. Susan Beal at Craft Stylish has a nice tutorial on this. She also has another useful tutorial for making pet ID tags.


    “Okay,” you say, “I’m convinced.” How do I get started with shrink film myself? Well, first you have to know that your options have greatly increased since we were kids. Regular shrink film now comes in clear, white, brown and black, which you can draw on with colored pencils or Sharpie-type markers. If you go the Sharpie route, I recommend protecting your pieces with a spray or brush-on sealant because it tends to scratch off.


    This is what I use to make the little meat charms and jewelry I sell at fairs and on Etsy, but you can scan, print and shrink virtually any image. I use the sheets made by Grafix, which you can get online (Blick is the most consistently inexpensive) or at Pearl art stores, among others. It comes in white and clear. You can even call up Grafix for a free sample to try it out. Occasionally I get a wonky pack that doesn’t shrink correctly but they always replace it right away. Shrinky Dinks brand also sells all the varieties.


    No matter which film you use, remember to use colors at about half strength, as they tend to saturate and darken when your piece shrinks. Expect your finished piece to measure about 40-50% of the original in each dimension. I set my oven to between 275-300°F so everything shrinks evenly. For about ten seconds after they come out you can flatten (or bend) your pieces, but use gloves because they will be extemely hot.


    I also read recently that you can use plastic from your recycling bin marked #6 as shrink film. Apparently the clear plastic kind (think clamshell take-out containers) and the opaque styrofoam kind (think supemarket meat trays) both work. I have also heard that the fumes are not the healthiest stuff to be breathing so I can’t really recommend this. I assume given the recent CPSIA brouhaha that store-bought shrink sheets are non-toxic because they are designed for kids, but PLEASE correct me if you have info to the contrary.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nancy john View Post
      You can make custom buttons with shrink film, perfect for when you can’t find the right button you need to finish a project. Susan Beal at Craft Stylish has a nice tutorial on this. She also has another useful tutorial for making pet ID tags.


      “Okay,” you say, “I’m convinced.” How do I get started with shrink film myself? Well, first you have to know that your options have greatly increased since we were kids. Regular shrink film now comes in clear, white, brown and black, which you can draw on with colored pencils or Sharpie-type markers. If you go the Sharpie route, I recommend protecting your pieces with a spray or brush-on sealant because it tends to scratch off.


      This is what I use to make the little meat charms and jewelry I sell at fairs and on Etsy, but you can scan, print and shrink virtually any image. I use the sheets made by Grafix, which you can get online (Blick is the most consistently inexpensive) or at Pearl art stores, among others. It comes in white and clear. You can even call up Grafix for a free sample to try it out. Occasionally I get a wonky pack that doesn’t shrink correctly but they always replace it right away. Shrinky Dinks brand also sells all the varieties.


      No matter which film you use, remember to use colors at about half strength, as they tend to saturate and darken when your piece shrinks. Expect your finished piece to measure about 40-50% of the original in each dimension. I set my oven to between 275-300°F so everything shrinks evenly. For about ten seconds after they come out you can flatten (or bend) your pieces, but use gloves because they will be extemely hot.


      I also read recently that you can use plastic from your recycling bin marked #6 as shrink film. Apparently the clear plastic kind (think clamshell take-out containers) and the opaque styrofoam kind (think supemarket meat trays) both work. I have also heard that the fumes are not the healthiest stuff to be breathing so I can’t really recommend this. I assume given the recent CPSIA brouhaha that store-bought shrink sheets are non-toxic because they are designed for kids, but PLEASE correct me if you have info to the contrary.
      Great tips here. Thanks!!
      Felicia
      http://ilovehandmadejewelry.com/
      http://www.etsy.com/sg-en/shop/filiksia
      https://www.facebook.com/Artzdescrap/
      https://www.instagram.com/artzdescrap/

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