Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jewellery course Lesson plans

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Jewellery course Lesson plans

    I have landed myself a fantastic 12 week course to deliver at the beginning of the new year which I am really excited about!!

    I am just a bit concerned about the lesson structure because each session is 2 hours long so I have to fill them all somehow. Ofcourse I have ideas of what I would like to do but i was just wondering if anyone was more experienced in delivering courses and how ou go about your planning!

    The people who are "employing" me to do the course would like an idea of a lesson plan when I go to meet them on Thursday so they can sell and promote it!!!!

    If anyone has any ideas PLEASE help!! Anything is much appreciated, no matter how small, and thank you in advance.

  • #2
    Re: Jewellery course Lesson plans

    Hi Carly!

    I've only given a few private lessons, but to be honest, I was surprised how slow the lesson went! If you have twelve 2-hour lessons, I think you could maybe cover a list of materials like 1st lesson: stretch magic, 2nd lesson: headpins/eyepins, 3rd lesson: tigertail (which inevitably will include crimping), 4th lesson: memory wire, etc. Or you could build your lesson around 1st lesson: stretch bracelet, 2nd lesson: charm bracelet, 3rd lesson: one strand necklace, 4th lesson: 3 strand necklace, 5th lesson: earrings, etc.

    You could have one class about making beaded rings - I can email you the instructions, they look fantastic as evening wear. Shame you don't live closer, I have tons of books and magazines you could borrow!!!

    I think it also depends on what you can do - for instance, I don't know much about bead weaving like peyote, so I wouldn't even go there!

    There are so many ways you could do this. You have to aim to finish at least one project per class so the student feel they are really getting something out of it and get the satisfaction of a finished item. [probably stating the obvious here!!!]

    That's really exciting!! Is this course taking place in a college?

    I enjoy giving classes because you really feel the satisfaction of the person when they've accomplished something! I let them choose the beads so they have a very personal feeling about what they're making, unique to them, to try and get them to create something personal. They always feel proud of wearing the items they made and I usually ''make'' them wear it straight away!! hehe!!

    Good luck!!!

    Bea
    Bead Shop, 91 Liverpool Road, Penwortham, Preston, PR1 0QB, Lancashire. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm, Sunday 11am-3pm.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for your reply!!
      I thought of doing the one item per session, I have 10 people going to be in the class so theres going to be lots of variety!
      I think its a good idea to concentrate on one material per session but I just am so concerned that what I will do isnt going to last out the 2 hours. Thats my main concern.
      Im not so worried abotu the items I will be making with them, I thik I will be able to work that quite nicely.

      I was thinking about a "task" where they pair off and have a chat to eachother and find bits out and then design a piece of jewellery for the other person based on what they find out and what they think they will like....does that make sense?Will it work? I suppose I can only try it! :s

      Its takng place in a multi agency family centre where families can go to access various help etc.

      I am pretty versatile with what I can do, I have tried many different things, teaching myself as I go along but the other thing I was thinking of is rewarding them at the end of he 12 weeeks with an item of jewellery that they havent tried making themselves for coming to every session. If they dont attend one session, they dont get it (unless its REALLY valid). What do you think??

      The other thing I was thinking of was doing an introduction for the first session where I talk about me, have a game to introduce everyone, then talk about materials, then have a break and then health and safety (if there is such a thing ni jewellery making, very little I suppose) and then let them play with the tools but not do anything specific. But I dont want them to get bored and not want to come so should I do a make too? LOL

      ooooohhhhhhhhhh

      Thanks for the advice! I am going to start getting on with some hand outs I think!!

      Carly

      Comment


      • #4
        The introduction of materials and tools, etc, is a very good idea for the first session! Hadn't thought of that but very valid point and a must. You could end with a simple stretch bracelet with glass beads or swarovski bicones.

        If you do one item per session, some items might not take 2 hrs, so you might have to do a set like matching necklace and earrings, or matching bracelet and necklace. Also will you have a break?

        Not sure about the pairing. I think I would prefer to make my own thing, but that's only my opinion! ops:
        Bead Shop, 91 Liverpool Road, Penwortham, Preston, PR1 0QB, Lancashire. Mon-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm, Sunday 11am-3pm.

        Comment


        • #5
          Completely un-jewelry related but when I ran groupworks (in my other life as a careers adviser) I always made sure I had extra activities planned for anyone who finished early. This was usually something that they could take home to finish if they wanted to (and the other students can also take it home so they don't feel they've missed out).

          Not sure how you could relate that to jewelry making but it always made me feel more relaxed knowing I had that activity up my sleave if I'd miscalculated my timings.

          Good luck and HOW exciting!!!
          Visit Natty Netty for a huge selection of Iris Folding supplies

          Comment


          • #6
            Bea, thats a good idea just to end with something really simple that I dont have to explain too much or go in to great detail with!

            Ill have another think about the pairing thing, see what other things I can come up with! I had actually toyed with the idea of what you had said about making a matching piece so that has confirmed its a pretty good idea! lol

            I will suggest there is a break otherwise itll be quite intense! Ill do a 15 min break.

            Nattynetty, Thanks for that! I hadnt really thought of that but it would overcome my concerns for not having the time wouldnt it! a great idea!! Thanks! Im sure I could find something for them to do atleast!

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Carly

              Although I have no experience in giving craft lessons, I used to be an adult ed lecturer so can offer some general tips on teaching/running courses. In training, we were advised to follow a pattern on the lines of Introduction of topic (where you present the topic but try to involve the students - ie ask general questions, ask about their experience etc - avoid too much 'teacher talk' at all costs!); followed by a hands on time (either individual, in pairs or small groups - pairs and groups of 4 seem to work best); then end with a consolidation time where you have a sort of feedback sessions (this is to check that students have understood the topic introduced - nothing formal just a recap/feedback). Other tips are dont hand out any paperwork, props etc before the information bit (ie where you want them to listen) otherwise they will be distracted looking at bits of paper etc and not listening. 20mins is an absolute maximum time for the brain to absorb any info - after this people start to switch off, so keep info giving down to this time. Breaks are a really good idea - it also gives the students chance to get to know each other. Ice breakers are also great at the beginning of the lesson, but need to make sure they are not too stressful for shy people (I also think going round the room introducing yourself takes too long and people get bored. I've found a good task is to hand out a sheet with about 10 questions on along the lines of "Find someone who..... can speak French", "Find someone who.... has been swimming with sharks" (always put one questions that it is unlikely anyone has done thus ensuring that the students have to ask more people; you could also incorporate some questions relating to your topic to get them chatting about it).

              Just realised have put no paragraphs in! Sorry, was dredging the grey matter! If you are able to, I would suggest planning the course as much as you are able from the beginning. This takes some of the pressure off you (so you're not thinking what can I do next week). Write down all your ideas and topics you would like to cover and then try and plan them in some sort of sequence (ie one week's learning is built on the following week). Some times its good to get them to do things for the following week, ie next week bring in some magazine pictures/ideas etc that you would like to incorporate into what you will be doing that week. Having definite results help as well, ie making something each week or making part of a larger project that builds up over the weeks (I think this is a good idea as it keeps them coming!).

              Fillers are also a great idea, ie tasks that maybe take 10 mins or so in case you are running ahead of schedule. Maybe you could introduce new tools/materials/or have quick recap sessions. Even stuff like in pairs come up with a design for wedding jewellery/Christmas etc. If you have fillers handy it again takes the worry off you thinking "Oh no, what am I going to do for the last 10 mins!". Not to worry you, but I used to teach 1.5 hour lessons and they were long. I would suggest you build in quite a lot of time where they are doing activities, and you circulate the room as they will want to ask you questions individually (this is important as some students may be too shy to ask out loud).

              Sorry that I've penned a bit of a tome! I hope this general info helps. Good luck with your course and please let me know if I can offer any further help.

              Best wishes
              Piglottie

              PS: It helps on a lesson plan to indicate how much time each task/section etc will take, and what materials you will need (even down to putting wipeboard markers etc) so that you can use this as a check list when preparing for the lesson.

              Comment


              • #8
                Piglottie, WOW!!! Thank you!!! There are so many great tips there that I can take with me!!

                Well my meeting is tomorrow so hopefully I can do enough to impress them!! They want to see the lesson plan you see so I have to get on with it pretty quick now!! I was kinda dreading it but I feel I shouldnt have left it to the last minute. Hey ho!

                Thank you again to everyone for their great hints and tips!! I shall put them to great use.

                Carly
                xx

                Comment

                Working...
                X