Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

why is selling so hard :O

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • why is selling so hard :O

    i wasnt expecting miracles, but i thought i may be would have a few sales.
    my jewellery is anything from necklaces, to hair combs, earrings, lots of stuff lol.
    i think its pretty decent, i feel as though im promoting all the time, getting the traffic but no sales
    anyone have any ideas?
    [mod edit - please read rules re posting url's]
    any help is much appreciated, thankyou
    Last edited by nattynetty; 19-01-2013, 10:22 PM.
    Live,love,laught and CRAFT!

    www.etsy.com/shop/akjcrafts


  • #2
    I can't view your stuff but everyone likes different styles anyway. Have you tried leaving items in your local hairdressers or nail salon? I didn't think much to jewellery on a local jewellery makers website but when I saw the items in the salon I made a 'waiting list' of items I wanted. The jewellery maker is altering the combination of beads I have selected from two necklaces and is making it to the length I wanted. I now have two on order and another one (or two) on my wish list.

    Comment


    • #3
      Problem is there are a lot of people out there doing the same thing I'm afraid...(sorry to be blunt) you need to find your USP and make your work stand out from the crowd. Also we really are in a recession, people aren't spending money on 'nick nacks' so perfect your craft and stay patient...none of us are in it for the money!
      Website: www.covegardennursery.co.uk
      Blog: www.covegardennursery.co.uk/garden-nursery-blog/
      Facebook: Cove Garden Nursery

      Comment


      • #4
        You're in a seriously saturated market......I can't see your website (you can put a link in your signature if it's a craft related site).
        Make sure your pics are the best they can be...make sure you display a geographic address to comply with DSRs (and will make potential customers feel more comfortable in purchasing from you) and give as much information as possible about your items. Fairs will enable people to really look at your pieces and then they can take a business card and order from you at a later date if they want.
        hope this helps a little xx
        Sarah x

        ~ The Lilac Dragonfly- Handmade Jewellery ~

        ~ Facebook Page ~




        Comment


        • #5
          To be honest, we are in the midst of a massive recession and unless you have been able to build up a following in the last 6 years anyone will struggle to make significant sales. I personally love jewellery but haven't bought any for years. I make my own and attempt to sell the excess. If I get a sale it's a bonus, if I don't.....I shrug and keep trying.
          Custom tribal belly dance costumes & accessories

          Unique jewellery for those who love to turn heads

          Comment


          • #6
            If selling were easy HMV and Blockbuster would not have folded and even the great M and S would not be in trouble. Read about marketing (there are some good practical books out there as well as many academic rubbish ones), think about what you are making, think about your target customer and what he or she wants and how she will find your stuff and finally think about pricing - perhaps the hardest thing of all to get right!

            Comment


            • #7
              Stick with it. I think it will take longer than usual to get established with a following customer base but enjoy your craft.
              James x
              www.facebook.com/CraftyCath

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Pearlescence View Post
                If selling were easy HMV and Blockbuster would not have folded and even the great M and S would not be in trouble. Read about marketing (there are some good practical books out there as well as many academic rubbish ones), think about what you are making, think about your target customer and what he or she wants and how she will find your stuff and finally think about pricing - perhaps the hardest thing of all to get right!
                Thats partly because they haven't moved with the times and utilised on line selling as much as they could have. I don't know how long it takes to get a craft business established but in my line of work it takes six months to a year to get sales and hence revenue in. In my first year my turnover wasn't very much, as expected, but we have grown year on year since we set up in February 2009. I know my market is very different to yours but as I sell a service to manufacturers but as they make less there are less 'sales' to be won. I have have been in my industry for thrity years and have noticed a lot more people buying just on price. As most of you on here, I am selling to the sector of the market that want quality not "cheap as chips". I agree with the previous posts, explore your target market and shout about your USP. Selling is an active occupation so don't expect your customers to come to you. They may do when you are established but sales is hard work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Selling is hard work.

                  I don't know how much traffic you are getting, or where it's coming from (it might not be potential customers, it could be fellow makers just having a nosy) but it takes a fair bit of traffic for sales to result. Not all traffic is equal!

                  Yes, you need a USP. You probably need items which are searched for online. You need keywords on your page, links leading to your page from elsewhere and traffic from Twitter, a blog, Facebook and possibly Pinterest. You could manage with less, but if you are struggling you probably need to spend a couple of hours a day on promoting (in a non-promotional way, if that makes sense - e.g. don't spam your Twitter followers with links, engage in conversation with them, dropping in info about what you are making - not about what you are selling).

                  Good luck!

                  PS: you can put your website in your signature and we can offer more specific advice (and you'll get a bit more traffic, although it might not be the kind that buys!)
                  digital stamps for cardmakers: http://www.handmadeharbour.co.uk
                  blog: http://handmadeharbour.blogspot.com
                  hand painted personalised plaques, clocks, canvases, etc: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk
                  blog: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk/blog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi, I know what you mean. There are alot of jewellery makers out there. I'm one of them but mine are crocheted.
                    I started in November last year (I've have had a few sales from my folksy shop) and think I went into it very naively. I didn't realise how much promotion you had to do!

                    Katie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not only promotion, but things that look good :=). Show me some of your work please!
                      Check out my page on various paracord projects you can make!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        To sell on line, you need to spend at least as much time and trouble per week promoting your work as you would spend planning for, travelling to, setting up and running a stall at a craft fair or market every Saturday.

                        That's the main reason I've decided not to sell online at present - I live in an internet blackspot, so travelling to fairs once a week is far easier and less time-consuming than is struggling with dodgy internet.


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eena View Post
                          To sell on line, you need to spend at least as much time and trouble per week promoting your work as you would spend planning for, travelling to, setting up and running a stall at a craft fair or market every Saturday.

                          That's the main reason I've decided not to sell online at present - I live in an internet blackspot, so travelling to fairs once a week is far easier and less time-consuming than is struggling with dodgy internet.
                          That's a very good point.....and to be honest if you can go and sell in person then you will have made some footway into selling online but it is hard. I've been successful in the past but things have slowed to the point now where I wonder if it is all worth it.
                          Custom tribal belly dance costumes & accessories

                          Unique jewellery for those who love to turn heads

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I spend, as a rough estimate, ten hours a week planning and setting up my display, travelling to and from a market and selling on it.

                            Even if I were to spend the equivalent time - a couple of hours per day - on promoting, tweaking, SEO and so on, it would take me months, not weeks, to build up a reputation, customer base and so on - a reputation which I've already gained while attending and selling at events in person. If BT ever does run a new cable down my little lane, I'll simply add my website/blog URLs to the phone number and email address on my business cards.

                            Until then, I'm happy attending fairs in areas where people are still willing to spend, rather than struggling daily with a slow and unreliable internet connection.


                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by eena View Post
                              I spend, as a rough estimate, ten hours a week planning and setting up my display, travelling to and from a market and selling on it.

                              Even if I were to spend the equivalent time - a couple of hours per day - on promoting, tweaking, SEO and so on, it would take me months, not weeks, to build up a reputation, customer base and so on
                              This kind of says it all - it does take months (at least 18+ months) to build up a reputation, customer base, etc online. In the meantime, sales at craft fairs will help towards it in a small way - if you want them to. But you still need the SEO, social networking, etc.

                              Eena, your internet connection sounds even worse than mine!
                              digital stamps for cardmakers: http://www.handmadeharbour.co.uk
                              blog: http://handmadeharbour.blogspot.com
                              hand painted personalised plaques, clocks, canvases, etc: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk
                              blog: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk/blog

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X