Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What surface can i solder on?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What surface can i solder on?

    hiya everyone!

    I need to find something to solder on that isnt going to cost an arm and a leg-well im hoping to find a cheaper alternative to the products ive seen so far that cost upwards of £10 etc..

    So if anyone can suggest something that would be great

    Someone suggested marble but this didnt sound right to me?

    blufizz x

  • #2
    http://www.palmermetals.co.uk/Tools/...t/default.aspx

    Several on here starting from £6.

    Do NOT use marble it will suffer from thermal shock and can shatter. You can damage marble and granite by just putting a very hot copper bottomed saucepan on it never mind 1300 degs of direct flame !! Sure someone like Mizgeorge will advise better but even £10 doesn't sound a lot to pay for not burning the house down. Don't know if a fire brick would do the job if you can salvage one.

    Mo.XX
    Mo. Bodrighy Wood.
    Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage..Lao Tzu.
    www.bodrighy.co.uk
    https://twitter.com/#!/AuntieMornie

    Comment


    • #3
      I've got a board from Tempsford Glass for my glass soldering, can't remember what its made of, its a kind of fibre board, but it didn't cost much at all, google them...
      Website: www.covegardennursery.co.uk
      Blog: www.covegardennursery.co.uk/garden-nursery-blog/
      Facebook: Cove Garden Nursery

      Comment


      • #4
        my thoughts exactly re the marble ..tho mine was just a gut feeling not based on any knowledge lol..thanks.....
        i guess i was just hoping i could utalise something around the house/garage etc -

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HF Glass Lady View Post
          I've got a board from Tempsford Glass for my glass soldering, can't remember what its made of, its a kind of fibre board, but it didn't cost much at all, google them...
          thank you for your suggestion...

          Comment


          • #6
            To protect your table you can put down a soldering board like these:
            http://www.cousinsuk.com/catalog/6/0...96.aspx#select
            Not very expensive at all!
            I'm not sure if it's better to do the actual soldering on a soldering block on top of this...but it's a start! x
            Emily Richard Jewellery
            www.ejr-jewellery.co.uk

            Emily Richard Jewellery on Facebook

            Now on Twitter! @EmilyRichard
            Jewellery Making Blog

            Comment


            • #7
              I think for safety's sake you're better off using a proper soldering block. I know it means finding the money, but can you really put a price on doing something and knowing you're taking all the safety precautions you can??

              From Cookson Gold, £5.40 inc. vat

              Sarah Gail Designs
              Sarah Gail Designs on Facebook
              Crafty Cat Events
              Crafty Cat Events on Facebook

              Comment


              • #8
                Is soldering jewellery different to soldering glass? Genuinely interested, what is the solder you use, presumably lead free? Its interesting to find out what other crafters do....!
                Website: www.covegardennursery.co.uk
                Blog: www.covegardennursery.co.uk/garden-nursery-blog/
                Facebook: Cove Garden Nursery

                Comment


                • #9
                  You need to solder on something that isn't a heat sink ie takes the heat away from the object you're trying to get hot enough to solder. Therefore really you do need something fit for the purpose - a fire brick or soldering block.
                  www.belovedly.co.uk
                  www.mybelovedlylife.blogspot.com
                  www.belovedly.folksy.com

                  Belovedly facebook group

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I believe fire bricks can still be picked up from hardware stores and I am sure I saw one at Wilkinsons the last time I was in there.

                    I have never soldered Jewlery but a fair amount of wiring, diy fixing etc and have used a firebrick and/or a helping hands (a small jig with crocodile clips to hold ends togehter)
                    Pat Murphy


                    http://www.gladturnings.co.uk
                    https://www.facebook.com/GladTurnings.Woodturning

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the replies everyone!

                      EMILY& MUFFIN thanks i think you might be right...a board then a block sounds like the way i will go....ive looked at cousins/cooksons/palmer etc and
                      all seem reasonable prices and a good choice

                      GLASS LADY it all seems to depend on what your soldering.....if its say just soldering silver jumps closed or making up dangle earrings and you want to close the jumps after youve finished your design then you wouldnt want the surface your soldering on to become too hot or reflect too much heat for fear of parts heating up too much/to quickly and parts melting that didnt want to........but im guessing when your soldering something more robust..invloving thicker materials/silver etc then the fact the mat reflects more heat i would imagine would be beneficial?? (plz dont quote me cos ive probably got it all wrong lol)

                      and yes lead free is a must! as is a good silver content i think?

                      ALIBEAR/PAT thanks for your input too :-)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Blue- you don't say what you are soldering but if it's silver you need flux as well as solder and solder block- a borax cone and dish is probably best
                        Full Time Jewellery Designer and Silversmith

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I prefer to solder on charcoal, which can also help reduce firescale. I also keep a honeycomb block handy for things I want to pin in place, and a couple of regular soldering blocks for argentium (shouldn't be soldered on charcoal) and very fine pieces where I want to avoid heat reflection.

                          Jane. Many small things are better soldered with paste, which is prefluxed and requires no additional flux. . Even if using paillons, if it's single joint work using only easy grade, then borax is certainly not the flux of choice. But you'd know that of course.

                          Glasslady - silver soldering is not actually soldering at all - it's brazing, and uses a flame rather than iron and requires much higher temperatures. The solder used has to contain enough silver to fulfil assay standards, and is generally available in four main grades (including enamelling), to allow for multi-joint pieces to be more easily fabricated.
                          george
                          www.mizgeorge.co.uk
                          www.etsy.com/shop/mizgeorge
                          www.flickr.com/mizgeorge

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            hiya jane.....ive got the solder and ive got the flux .....well i think ive got the right stuff ...
                            it all seems to be spiralling lol......what i thought was a simple process is now turning into something much more invloved ...
                            i dont suppose you know of any good informative books on the subject....a kind of "dummies do soldering" :-)

                            oh and its just jump rings to begin.....ive never even held a soldering iron/blow torch....id like my designs to be more stable so thought soldering would be the best way to achieve this...its all very interesting

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mizgeorge View Post
                              I prefer to solder on charcoal, which can also help reduce firescale. I also keep a honeycomb block handy for things I want to pin in place, and a couple of regular soldering blocks for argentium (shouldn't be soldered on charcoal) and very fine pieces where I want to avoid heat reflection.

                              Jane. Many small things are better soldered with paste, which is prefluxed and requires no additional flux. . Even if using paillons, if it's single joint work using only easy grade, then borax is certainly not the flux of choice. But you'd know that of course.

                              Glasslady - silver soldering is not actually soldering at all - it's brazing, and uses a flame rather than iron and requires much higher temperatures. The solder used has to contain enough silver to fulfil assay standards, and is generally available in four main grades (including enamelling), to allow for multi-joint pieces to be more easily fabricated.
                              hiya George (?)
                              ive seen the solder paste online....would you say to solder silver jump rings etc it works better? also whats its shelf -life?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X