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Pricing question again , sorry

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  • Pricing question again , sorry

    Hi lovely people,

    This question has been asked loads I imagine, but I have looked and can't find this weird question lol.

    Wondered what you guys do when working out the price's of Jewellery when you have used seed beads other little bits and bobs you may have brought in bulk.

    It is easy to work out the cost of everything else but seeds beads baffle me.

    Also I know I could find the answer to this but once you have added the cost of materials, packaging, hourly rate how much do you times it by????


    Thanks so much in advance.

    Eve
    xxx
    www.etsy.com/shop/ZoeEllenJewellery?ref=pr_shop

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Zoe-El...ref=ts&sk=wall

  • #2
    If you have bought your seed beads by weight, you know the weight to begin with, weigh the packet after your made item, then you can work out the cost for the amount you have used. You will need quite small measure and accurate scales, don't think kitchen will do as probably don't go below 25g, which is the size of a packet of seed beads, perish the thought of having to count how many you have in the packet first, good luck if you go down that route, half of mine would be snorted up by the dog!

    Re times this is up to you but you need to allow for a wholesale price (in case the trade wish to buy) and a retail price. Some books recommend 3 X for retail and 1 X for trade

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    • #3
      I agree with caroleecrafts about weighing the pack to see how much you've used but again totally agree that you need really accurate scales! In regards to pricing your finished pieces this really does depend on a number of factors including the ones mentioned above but if you do a search on this forum there are quite a few threads that go into detail and will give you an in depth explanation of it all.
      hth
      Emma
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      • #4
        Thanks Caroline,

        That is such a good idea about weighing it. I would have never have thought of that myself, thanks.
        Oh and I have actually thought about counting them and then thought i'd give it a miss coz probably end up with less than half of them lol

        Thanks so much.
        www.etsy.com/shop/ZoeEllenJewellery?ref=pr_shop

        http://www.facebook.com/pages/Zoe-El...ref=ts&sk=wall

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        • #5
          I'll think i'll buy scales, need them for checking the weight of to see if stuff needs hall marking i think, not that I have sold anything yet.

          Thanks guys
          www.etsy.com/shop/ZoeEllenJewellery?ref=pr_shop

          http://www.facebook.com/pages/Zoe-El...ref=ts&sk=wall

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          • #6
            I just have a button on my costing sheet called filler beads, and guestimate it, might be slightly easier if it's just a few
            Dainty Rocks Jewellery ~ www.daintyrocks.etsy.com ~ www.daintyrocks.co.uk ~ @DaintyRocks

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            • #7
              A Jeweler once told me 4x cost of material plus labor. Needless to say I dont follow that. 3x cost of material for me....

              Q2

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              • #8
                Yep, weighing is the way to go! (baaaaad pun ) My mum has a set of micro scales, and I tease her that if she ever gets raided, the cops will think she's some sort of pensioner drug baron heehee

                Seriously, though, it's pretty accurate.

                In terms of pricing items, I set myself an hourly rate (which varies - I'd never sell my bead-woven stuff if I charged properly for how long it takes!); I add the cost of materials and add a set amount.

                But it's not an exact science for me - some things cost v little to make, take v little time and sell with an excellent mark-up, and other stuff which takes longer to make tends not to sell if I base the price on my hourly rate, so I try to do a mix of things where I make a good profit where I can, and not so much on other things - it balances out.

                Seems to work at the moment!

                Sarah Gail Designs
                Sarah Gail Designs on Facebook
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                • #9
                  My parents run a company that casts metal items for jewellers, model makers and hobbists...

                  Everything is weighed, timed and accounted for.

                  There's even a very detailed spreadsheet that all you need do is enter the weight, metal/plastic type, mould size and weight/type and spin time or pour and cool time (if its lost wax) and at the end of it it details the unit cost including labour, materials - everything

                  If i ever go into professional crafting I hope I inherit it as im useless with numbers!!!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by muffin789 View Post

                    In terms of pricing items, I set myself an hourly rate (which varies - I'd never sell my bead-woven stuff if I charged properly for how long it takes!); I add the cost of materials and add a set amount.
                    I think its always good to remember that we do this because we love it... people will often remark that im selling myself at a loss if I count my hours... and whilst technically that is very true the pay off is that im doing something I enjoy and i'd be doing it anyway whether I ws selling them or not...

                    But then again I only make and sell perhaps one or two items a month!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Spoons View Post
                      I think its always good to remember that we do this because we love it... people will often remark that im selling myself at a loss if I count my hours... and whilst technically that is very true the pay off is that im doing something I enjoy and i'd be doing it anyway whether I ws selling them or not...

                      But then again I only make and sell perhaps one or two items a month!
                      Unfortunately casting and making jewellery is my full time living and i have to pay my taxes somehow so sadly this theory doesnt work haha. i have make a good profit and not just make the jewellery for the fun of it, although granted i enjoy some parts of it.

                      Stu
                      Sterling silver jewellery designed and made by Stuart Colclough in Wales.

                      www.scsilver.co.uk

                      www.scsilver.blogspot.com

                      Cymru am Byth.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SCsilver View Post
                        Unfortunately casting and making jewellery is my full time living and i have to pay my taxes somehow so sadly this theory doesnt work haha. i have make a good profit and not just make the jewellery for the fun of it, although granted i enjoy some parts of it.

                        Stu
                        Oh absolutely I take your point.

                        I've worked in the arts my entire life, the majority as a designer or props maker in theatre and the argument we always made was that we subsidised it from within. In my spare time then and now i knock thinks up and sell them... but even though I charge a fair price the margins are small.

                        My parents on the other hand have for 30 years run a casting and mouldmaking business and have had to be a lot more vicious than I ever would... it;s bread and butter for them!

                        For me I couldn't move out of the arts sector, i'd rather be poor and happy than well off and sad

                        But as you say there are people like yourself who itemise accurately... and that's still something Id recommend to anyone even if they are prepared to "skip the labour costs" every now on the odd project! Not least because often the stark truth of the real cost can help you devise new efficient production methods!
                        Last edited by Spoons; 17-09-2010, 01:09 AM.

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