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  • Selling your Jewellery

    Well on Friday I will be ordering my 1st ever jewellery making kit, also have been looking at different beads etc what's available, and have found loads I like the look of.

    Anyway I have a question for all those who sell there jewellery on thier website, other sites and at craft fairs. How and where do you sell your goods and does it make a viable business for you (I don't care about figures as it's none of my business) but do you make money or spend more on the tools and accessories than you make back.

    Don't worry, not getting ahead of myself, just looking to the future and I know what one person does has no bearing on how successful or not another person is.

  • #2
    I earn a living out making jewellery, however i have been helped massively by living at home with my parents and so not such a big risk to go full-time. I have only just recently launched my website so it is a little slow, i expect this to take me a few months/years to get this working correctly. I trade at most of the major events around the country having previously traded at local markets. What kind of jewellery are you planning to make? i make sterling silver and my selling prices range from £12-£300 for a single item, i expect as i build a name for myself this should hopefully go up

    any more questions just fire away.

    Stu
    Sterling silver jewellery designed and made by Stuart Colclough in Wales.

    www.scsilver.co.uk

    www.scsilver.blogspot.com

    Cymru am Byth.

    Comment


    • #3
      I am looking to go with beaded jewellery, however I want to be unique with my designs so am looking at lampwork beads as have seen some fantastic looking ones as well, also intrested in shell beads, basically anything unusual and not plastic (I think).

      I know It's a good Idea to cator for the female market, however I would still like to have a large selection of mail jewellery, everytime I see people now I seem to be staring at thier beaded jewellery, though that's going to get me into trouble

      I think sterling silver is out of my league, I am more into the design and materials than actually making something as difficoult or as expensive as yourself.

      Anyway hopefully will be able to post a photo of my peice by the end of next week

      Comment


      • #4
        PS Great website Stu

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you, i look forward to seeing some of your designs.

          Stu
          Sterling silver jewellery designed and made by Stuart Colclough in Wales.

          www.scsilver.co.uk

          www.scsilver.blogspot.com

          Cymru am Byth.

          Comment


          • #6
            I've been selling since February and bought all the tools and several beads. I am not yet out of the red, but getting closer every week.
            I am now building on my website and to be honest I haven't done much in the way of craft fairs and fetes etc, but sell in shops in my local town.
            I have begun doing tiaras and wedding jewellery and am just doing my fourth wedding.
            Think my problem is that I love too many beads and just love ordering them all!

            Good luck

            http://eiledon.co.uk
            http://eiledon.co.uk

            http://eiledonworkingfromhome.blogspot.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Eiledon View Post
              Think my problem is that I love too many beads and just love ordering them all!
              I know what you mean, have been looking at all different sites and even folksy, although most beads are not too expensive, I have still found around £100 worth of "essential" beads that I would like.

              Comment


              • #8
                oops, just spent a tenner on Folksy on some beads, now I have started there will be no stopping me lol - oh well no backing out now, just have to wait for my Items.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I sell my work just through my own website / online store since 2004. I used to do a lot of shows / sell through shops before then, but moved over to all online direct sales now.

                  Also my art bead business sort of took over my passions really and I don't make so much jewellery anymore. I still make and sell some from my site, but mostly I let my clients make the jewellery as they work my beads way better than I can.

                  So, from personal experience and also looking at some of my customers - yes, you can make a living from your jewellery. But it takes time and a talent for all aspects of the business. Most of the people I know who are making a living have been working hard for many years, slowly building it all up. So I don't think there are any overnight sucess stories, but the potential is always there for longer term growth.

                  As for beads - well, that is really where my passion is. I think you are very right to look to artist made beads. We have some fabulous bead artists here in the UK now.

                  As a bead artist myself though - and one who works in multiple mediums - I would say don't discount "plastic". Plastic in itself is not a dirty word. There are some amazing artist-made polymer clay beads to be found, which are plastic after all. Also, some of the most beautiful vintage beads around are plastic beads. Most people would claw your arm off for Bakelite beads too, which again are plastic.

                  Instead of focusing too much on the materials a bead is made from, I would suggest you really always keep an eye on the quality. There are good and bad glass beads, good and bad metal beads etc etc.

                  With metal beads and findings - understand and be aware of our EU nickel laws and avoid things that look like obvious mass-made imports. The cheapo findings on ebay and the like from the far east seldom meet the legal requirements. You might consider using something hypo-allergenic like Niobium or Titanium like I carry, if you want quality findings that won't cost the earth.

                  If buying lampwork, again be aware that much mass produced stuff floods the market - don't be fooled into paying top dollar for factory-made rubbish. Shop around and check out www.britishlampwork.co.uk if you want to find some great UK bead artists.

                  Polymer clay beads are really popular at the mo. If buying polymer, look for artists who understand the medium. There should be no very thin parts to a good polymer clay bead, anything too thin or flimsy is liable to break. But a well made, well thought out polymer clay bead will outlast you and me, that is for sure!

                  I have some tutorials on my website about pricing jewellery and selling jewellery that you might also find useful (just scroll to the bottom of the page to find them)
                  http://www.ejrbeads.co.uk/tutorials.htm

                  As for costs and outlays - it really does tend to level out once you get going. At first, you will be needing to spend out on more tools and other bits and bobs. Over time though, those do pay for themselves.

                  The other thing is to invest in a good book about marketing and selling. Learning these skills gives you more confidence and ideas to really get out there and sell your work.

                  Good luck and careful about the beads, they are HIGHLY addictive!
                  Emma
                  www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                  www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                  www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Emma. Not into jewellery at all but I did enjoy reading that. I have repped you.
                    Carol
                    God helps them that help themselves.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh thanks Carol.

                      Emma
                      Emma
                      www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                      www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                      www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        WOW Emma,

                        Thanks for that reply, it was a great help thanks, and gives me some good areas to look ar, thanks again.

                        Shane

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Oh I wish I could say you will make a living..but it's terribly terribly addictive..Every new bead is an inspiration...I have drawers full of beads I have been inspired by and never had chance to do anything with.

                          However, if you are more disciplined than me....Get in early at craft fairs, jewellery stalls tend to be over subscribed at most fairs, find a local outlet that will sell your jewellery..a hairdressers, a beautician, a small independent shop.

                          Good luck with your new venture
                          http://www.beadsandjewellerysupplies.co.uk/

                          http://www.facebook.com/BeadsUK

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by soapitup View Post
                            WOW Emma,

                            Thanks for that reply, it was a great help thanks, and gives me some good areas to look ar, thanks again.

                            Shane
                            You're very welcome Shane

                            Emma
                            Emma
                            www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                            www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                            www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Angie View Post
                              Oh I wish I could say you will make a living..but it's terribly terribly addictive..Every new bead is an inspiration...I have drawers full of beads I have been inspired by and never had chance to do anything with.

                              However, if you are more disciplined than me....Get in early at craft fairs, jewellery stalls tend to be over subscribed at most fairs, find a local outlet that will sell your jewellery..a hairdressers, a beautician, a small independent shop.

                              Good luck with your new venture
                              I think you hit the nail on the head there.

                              Discipline in getting out into the market place (be that real life or online) is the key to how well you will do.

                              I see many people start up in the bead and jewellery world, build a great website and then sit back and wait for the sales to come in. Then, when the sales don't magically appear, they get disheartened.

                              But you have to work SO hard to build up a clientele online or off.

                              If you are selling out in the real world, you do need to plan and book ahead on fairs etc. Just knowing which fairs to do, which not to bother with in itself is a pretty steep learning cliff.

                              The other thing is to make the most of any chances you do get. If you contact a shop / gallery and they are not interested, don't get embarassed, mumble a goodbye and put the phone down. Thank them for their time and ask them if they would mind you getting in touch in another 6 months in case the situation changes or you have other things that might appeal to them more.

                              With customers, try to build a mailing list where you can email interested parties. So long as you don't abuse it, many people like to be kept in touch with what you are doing. You don't have to do the hard sell - just the odd email a few times a year works wonders. A simple "hey, its Christmas coming up and I would love it if you considered visiting my website when looking for those special gifts"

                              The point is, anyone wanting to make their money from their craft has to work more on selling the items than making them usually. Learn where the customers hang out, what mags they read, what forums they read etc. It is no point ever trying to sell your wares to people more likely to make their own than buy.

                              If you are looking for an online sales strategy, places like Etsy are a great way to go. At first, they will give you more exposure to potential customers than you own website alone. Even with Etsy though, you still have to work hard to get noticed.

                              Emma
                              Emma
                              www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                              www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                              www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

                              Comment

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