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Photographing jewellery

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  • Photographing jewellery

    People are always asking how they can improve their photographs or how they can make their jewellery stand out from the rest of the crowd.

    I have been trawlling the sites and found some really good examples of what others have done, in terms of varying styles and layout and use of colours.

    I have blogged about it here:

    http://www.whoatemycrayons.com/wordpress/?p=163

    I also found a gorgeous ring which I now want to buy (a lot) so everyone's a winner

    I know there will be members here who will have great tips and tricks they can impart, so I'd love to hear from you.
    Design, not rocket science. Illustrator, graphic and web designer, mum of two, wife and self-appointed font police.

    Changing the world one crayon at a time.

    website: www.whoatemycrayons.com



  • #2
    photographing jewellery

    Hi, thanks so much for this link, I have major problems with photgraphing my pieces and was on the verge of shelling out for a professional to help........I've used natural daylight, studio setting with table top daylight lamps, even bought a Cloud Dome (which was sold on asap!) etc but I get very little sparkle on my crystals and pearls are a total white-out.

    I love the weblink ideas you gave, thanks so much, but I also think a full version of the item is needed once the eye is captivated with the close ups as shown. thanks very much, am off to my studio now, camera in hand!!
    Jan Miller
    Jan Miller Design

    Comment


    • #3
      photo

      I am still grateful to the forum person who told me to put my jewelelry in the white sink or bath to photograph & reflect light.
      thanks

      Cath

      [email protected]

      party, party, party, book a party before christmas, £25 of free jewellery if you get 10 guests..................and a lovely night!

      (feel free to do the rep points thingy!!)

      www.vivalabeader.com

      view gallery @ ww.flickr.com/photos/vivalabeader
      [email protected] www.facebook.com/vivalabeader
      [email protected] www.folksy.com/shops/vivalabeader

      Comment


      • #4
        I have some white crushed velvet I use for table covering and discovered it works quite well for photographing jewellery (see website).. not perfect, but better than on stands

        x
        Nici

        Website: http://www.goblindreams.co.uk
        Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Goblin-Dreams/33795458652
        Folksy: http://www.folksy.com/shops/goblindreams
        Blog:
        http://goblindreamer.Blogspot.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jan Miller View Post
          Hi, thanks so much for this link, I have major problems with photgraphing my pieces and was on the verge of shelling out for a professional to help........I've used natural daylight, studio setting with table top daylight lamps, even bought a Cloud Dome (which was sold on asap!) etc but I get very little sparkle on my crystals and pearls are a total white-out.

          I love the weblink ideas you gave, thanks so much, but I also think a full version of the item is needed once the eye is captivated with the close ups as shown. thanks very much, am off to my studio now, camera in hand!!
          Jan Miller
          Jan Miller Design
          Glad it helped you out Jan, make sure you post some pictures once you have done them!

          @Vivalabeader - love the idea of using the bath or sink! No extra costs involved. I love how creative people can be.
          Design, not rocket science. Illustrator, graphic and web designer, mum of two, wife and self-appointed font police.

          Changing the world one crayon at a time.

          website: www.whoatemycrayons.com


          Comment


          • #6
            Excellent

            What a great web page, really helpful and certainly made me start thinking about photographing my jewellery differently.

            Thanks!
            Jewellery Shops and Info - Lustre Jewellery
            Jewellery Buying Guide - Jewellery Buying Tips
            Gold Fusion - Handcrafted Jewellery

            Comment


            • #7
              I place my piece on a white tile that i bought. Pics come out well.
              Snowf1975

              https://www.etsy.com/listing/1039948...polished-beads

              Comment


              • #8
                I have terrible trouble as if I am submitting to a magazine, they want white plain backgrounds, but trying to photograph pearls on white is so difficult, and as someones said the swarovski crystal just doesnt sparkle at all

                also photographing a tiara is a pain in the neck flat on the floor, the best way ive found to do it, which might work well for other things if you have a light tent, put a white box under the tent and balance it on top, then place the item on the raised platform that it creates - you can then photograph straight on but still get a good angle
                www.rocksforfrocks.co.uk
                http://www.facebook.com/pages/Rocks-For-Frocks/230802980887

                Comment


                • #9
                  Notes on Photographing Jewellery

                  Ive just put some notes together for someone, but I'll add my piece here as we hardly need *another* photographing jewellery thread

                  These are a few very basic hints about how to photograph small pieces of jewellery to promote your work.

                  Get the Picture Proportion Right


                  Photos selected for online marketplaces may be auto-cropped. Then you don't see the whole piece of jewellery on the front page, or they get squashed, and you get a nasty black border in the free space.

                  Think about this when taking your photographs.

                  Start with Large Photos for Sharpness, and take Several Pics

                  I'd suggest trying having several photos of each piece, one overall and different angles or details. You can make them sharper by starting with bigger pics and reducing them. I'd suggest starting with 1600x1200 or bigger.

                  Make sure that you tell Misi which pic is the thumbnail (I think you can do that), and make sure that that one is in the right proportions to do your pieces justice.

                  Use a Decent Camera - Phones are not good enough


                  Borrow a reasonable camera if your existing one is not that good. A compact digital camera should be OK.

                  Use a Free Editing Application

                  A good free editing applicaton is Irfanview, which I cannot link to yet.

                  [Update: I can now - http://www.irfanview.net/]

                  Note: when you resize or filter, do it as few times as possible and restart from the original pic, and "resample" don't "resize". Experiment but keep it simple.

                  Use Backgrounds and 3 dimensions

                  Can you do anything about interesting backgrounds or 3d presentation?

                  I'm not sure if crushed velvet is still the thing, but natural backgrounds or bathroom tiles can be good, or even upside down wineglasses for displaying bracelets etc.

                  Control Your Highlights

                  You could use "fill in flash" (or a table lamp) to add highlights. But watch for tungsten bulbs, as they will mess up your colours.

                  Table-Top Tripod

                  A table-top tripod can hold the camera steady. These cost a few pounds from a gadget shop or one may have come with a webcam or videocam.

                  Or you *could* use a beanbag.

                  Camera Self-Times


                  If there is still a problem with camera shake, use the 5-10s timer and then let go of the camera to allow it to settle. Take care to make sure it is focused on the area you want sharp.

                  Use a Reflector to Paint with Light

                  A reflector lets you control where the light falls, add highlights etc.

                  This is basically a circle of reflective material which you place near your subject to change the light.

                  They cost a few pounds from a photog shopraphy such, or you can experiment with something homemade that is not as good - such as a white sheet of card or one covered in tinfoil. You could even try an embroidery ring stretched with white cotton, but that may be too small.

                  Use a Softbox

                  You could go for a "softbox" - a translucent frame (e.g., wood covered in muslin) open at one side which softens the light and which you put your items inside to photograph. But that really shouldn't be necessary.

                  If you have lace curtains, they can soften light too.

                  Or do your photography using light from a north-facing window/skylight or on a dull day to give naturally more even light.

                  Wrapping-Up

                  Those are a few simple steps which should help - but, mainly, experiment, experiment, experiment.
                  Last edited by ferdinand2000; 04-08-2009, 07:55 PM. Reason: I can now add a link
                  Photographer, printmaker, cardmaker, craft supplies.
                  http://mrcello.misi.co.uk/
                  http://www.discountarts.co.uk/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    great blog, thanks for the link!
                    www.sundaygirlaccessories.co.uk

                    [email protected]

                    http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/pa...7904169?ref=ts

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great tips and links, Thankyou

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Great info. If I want expert shots I'll get my hubby to do them with his Cannon SLR. But for now I'll stick to my we Lumix point and shoot. I usually take about 10 of each item from different angles and I get some fairly ok pics. I'm getting better with age I think.
                        BCandy (aka BJewellery)
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                        http://BJewellery.misi.me.uk


                        http://busymitts.com/people/BJewellery/projects

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for all your comments guys.

                          Glad that it has helped some of you with thinking about your own shots. I think that while some of the examples I showed may not be technically perfect, I liked them for their creativity and use of colour and for me, that's why they stood out.
                          Design, not rocket science. Illustrator, graphic and web designer, mum of two, wife and self-appointed font police.

                          Changing the world one crayon at a time.

                          website: www.whoatemycrayons.com


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Magazines says to use black or white plain background, but i had a cookery book from america when i was little and the photos made it look so appetising, little flamingoes for the pineapple dishes with umbrellas, giltter, strawberries on the side, pearlescent paper for others. No reason jewellery cant be made to look appetising!
                            I like themes but as long as it's subtle. I think with my pics i have so many on oen page it needs a plain boring background! But i like visiting sites that are either elegant or just really fruity and fun!
                            http://www.justgiving.com/renata-harris (1/2 marathons for World Society for the Protection of Animals)
                            http://flashsparkle.blogspot.com Vegan cookery

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My attempt at creative photography!
                              http://www.craftsforum.co.uk/album.p...pictureid=6962
                              http://www.justgiving.com/renata-harris (1/2 marathons for World Society for the Protection of Animals)
                              http://flashsparkle.blogspot.com Vegan cookery

                              Comment

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