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Tips for photographing jewellery please.

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  • #31
    I prefer to use a pale grey card as a background for silver jewellery, which makes it look quite nice as an alternative to white - and I use a desk lamp with some tracing paper over it to stop any bright reflections. Try moving the angle of the lamp cos that really does make a difference. I don't use a flash as it makes the shadow look a bit too harsh.

    I took all the photos on my website, with a lot of trial and error! Got there in the end though. Saying that, I've asked a photographer friend of mine to have a bash at it so I'm eagerly looking forward to seeing what he's come up with!
    Emily Richard Jewellery
    www.ejr-jewellery.co.uk

    Emily Richard Jewellery on Facebook

    Now on Twitter! @EmilyRichard
    Jewellery Making Blog

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    • #32
      Wow Emily, I love your jewellery! Your pictures are fab, they are better than ones I've paid a fortune to have done professionally!
      Lucy

      www.lucykempjewellery.co.uk
      http://lucykempjewellery.blogspot.com

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      • #33
        im no expert on the photos front but I'm really not a fan of scanned jewellery - i think it looks flat. I prefer to see really interesting angles and close ups etc. looking on Etsy and checking out jewellery on the front page is inspiring as there are some amazing photography (obviously there is some that is terrible too - but usually the picks on the FP look great)
        www.AREjewellery.etsy.com
        http://arehandmadejewellery.blogspot.com/
        http://www.folksy.com/shops/AREjewellery

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        • #34
          Originally posted by lucykempjewellery View Post
          Wow Emily, I love your jewellery! Your pictures are fab, they are better than ones I've paid a fortune to have done professionally!
          Thank you, that's very kind of you!
          Emily Richard Jewellery
          www.ejr-jewellery.co.uk

          Emily Richard Jewellery on Facebook

          Now on Twitter! @EmilyRichard
          Jewellery Making Blog

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          • #35
            i have old 4 megapixel samsung

            it is old but have good 4x macro

            what i do is:
            place object next to the window
            put camera on tripod ( a tiny one from a pound shop)
            use timer shutter

            camera settings:
            manual ( no auto )
            ISO 100
            quality - best wherever possible
            hold a sheet of white paper between the window and object to dissolve the light. you need to look through the camera while adjusting the paper to find right position.

            upload to picasa ( from google - i recommend this)
            retouch (very easy automated functions)
            save on disc or upload to google web albums

            w



            Originally posted by Glitterbug View Post
            How does it work with Photobox? I'm useless with Photoshop - would I find Photobox easier?
            follow me on twitter: http://twitter.com/labelhunt
            visit my Etsy shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/labelhunt
            become a fan of my Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Labelhunt

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            • #36
              I find placing the jewellery on a piece of fabric works well. I use a piece of white velvet normally used for making miniature teddy bears.
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              Misi

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Rachel-Carlyle View Post
                Yep, doing a search will give you a lot of answers.

                My personal way is a wing and a prayer, lol. I have no fancy gadgets, I just use my camera (macro setting, no flash), a plain white sheet of paper and good daylight (if I can get it). Then there's a bit of fiddling in photoshop, and onto the websites.

                Takes time and patience though... you have to take many shots sometimes to only get one or two you can actually use.

                That's how i do it aswell, nice to see that i'm not the only one

                Val

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                • #38
                  Photographing Jewellery

                  I use a trippod as it enables you to take a photo without a flash. And where possible natural light, also using slate, wood, driftwood to support your piece gives an interesting textural element to the finished photo.

                  Have you tried Picassa, a free programme. Lets you trim and adjust eah pic very easily

                  Tim
                  Tim Broughton

                  http://bridgewaterjewelleryworkshops.co.uk/default.aspx

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                  • #39
                    I get the best light when the sun is out (if I'm lucky) and then use the macro setting on my camera and hope for the best. I think my pictures aren't too bad considering.
                    http://aingealjewellerydesigns.blogspot.com/
                    http://www.folksy.com/shops/AingealDesigns

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                    • #40
                      Yes, I agree check out posts by Ian Beckerto. He gave me plenty of advice when I put up a similiar post last year.

                      But I also use digital camera on macro, I have a white tub chair by the bedroom window that I use, but I have to choose the time of day carefully, and that changes day to day. I could take 30 photos of the one piece and only get a couple of good shots.

                      Must try the bath idea though, sound like that might work!
                      Carol
                      http://www.facebook.com/#!/CarolShawJewellery

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                      • #41
                        My bead photos are all done with my digi cam, light tent, tripod and flourescent lighting - tried other things, but that seems to work best for me. Then tweaked in photoshop.

                        One of my dreams is to have a trained monkey that will do all the photos for me, never squeal too much and only need a few bananas a day. I hate taking photos - bored, bored, bored with it.

                        To be honest, I am not that keen on monkeys either, but needs must....
                        Emma
                        www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                        www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                        www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by ejralph View Post
                          My bead photos are all done with my digi cam, light tent, tripod and flourescent lighting - tried other things, but that seems to work best for me. Then tweaked in photoshop.

                          One of my dreams is to have a trained monkey that will do all the photos for me, never squeal too much and only need a few bananas a day. I hate taking photos - bored, bored, bored with it.

                          To be honest, I am not that keen on monkeys either, but needs must....
                          Haha! this really made me laugh!! Mainly because my boyfriend calls me his monkey yet he's the photographer! (and better yet his nickname is doggy :P)


                          Lou Lou's Luxuries on Folksy


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                          • #43
                            I also use a white paper background. I use an ordinary digital camera on a macro setting and adjust the light setting according to the type of light I use eg: daylight or halogen light etc.

                            Once uploaded to my computer I use microsoft office picture manager to clean them up. If you have this available, go to the colour option and click on enhance, this allows you to choose the part of the white background you want to enhance eg. a darker section. You can then click on the Edit Pictures option and auto correct your picture. Trial and error but I seem to be getting some good results. All of the (traditional) charm pictures on my website have been taken by me using this method.

                            charmed memories
                            Last edited by Charmed1000; 13-02-2010, 09:20 PM.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by monkeyloulou View Post
                              Haha! this really made me laugh!! Mainly because my boyfriend calls me his monkey yet he's the photographer! (and better yet his nickname is doggy :P)
                              ROFL - oh well, we are piggy and snake!

                              Emma
                              Emma
                              www.ejrbeads.co.uk - unique art beads & more
                              www.ejrbeads.co.uk/shop - beads, polymer clay, glitters and inks oh my
                              www.facebook.com/EJRBeads - Like me at Facebook!

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                              • #45
                                Lightbox

                                Hi,
                                Lighting and lens quality are priorities.

                                A light box is essential. You can even make your own if you wish. Also, control the lighting using daylight bulbs. I have a 3yr old canon digital camera with only 5mg px, but i chose it because of the lens quality, which is superb.

                                best of luck
                                http://www.sofiagaver.dk

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