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  • How Much???

    Hi All!!! I got my first commission. Well, it was the mother in law so obviously i did it for free. A necklace and bracelet to match a wedding outfit. Its turned out really well and it took me 2 hours to make.
    So, she was asking me to work out prices for items that i had made so she could take them into her work to see if anyone wanted to buy. So i was thinking £6 p/h is the basic wage so straight away that would be £12 and then materials on top of that, plus any packaging so i was maybe thinking £18-£20 for the set. But she thought that that was quite pricey and said that when jewellery sellers normally come into her work, they sell a set for £12. But iv seen the stuff she's bought before and its pretty tatty. Cheapo beads and visible crimps. So should i start cutting the material costs so make thing more affordable ? Or do i just hope someone buys it at the quoted price???

    I really thought that i made a beautiful job of the necklace and bracelet (wish i had taken a pic now!!!) and id be gutted to sell it for £12 !!!
    Snowf1975

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/1039948...polished-beads

  • #2
    No don't sell for £12 look on etsy and dawanda for a comparison. Don't sell your self short stick to your guns even your estimations are cheep.
    "You've Got to Keep Your Mind Wide Open" - AnnaSophia Robb
    my Folksy shop Goldy'sclearoutblog debaynewebdesign


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    • #3
      yeah but do the ones on dawanda and etsy actually sell??? I have a dawanda and iv sold squat. Dont have an etsy though (no credit card )
      Snowf1975

      https://www.etsy.com/listing/1039948...polished-beads

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SNOWF1975 View Post
        yeah but do the ones on dawanda and etsy actually sell??? I have a dawanda and iv sold squat. Dont have an etsy though (no credit card )
        You've only been there a couple of weeks hone. be patient. litle tip don't post every thing up all at once a few every other day or so keeps your profile up. The thing on there is you have to self promote.

        It's your choice sell cheap not a lot of profit, or feel good by earning what you feel is justified.
        "You've Got to Keep Your Mind Wide Open" - AnnaSophia Robb
        my Folksy shop Goldy'sclearoutblog debaynewebdesign


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        • #5
          How frustrating, I think sell it for what you think its worth and not what she tells you.

          I am always happy to pay a bit more for handmade jewellery etc as I know the time and effort that has gone into that and its frustrating that people dont seem to appreciate it and compare prices to mass produced things.

          Shame you didnt get pic would have loved to see it

          xHannah

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SNOWF1975 View Post
            So, she was asking me to work out prices for items that I had made so she could take them into her work to see if anyone wanted to buy. So i was thinking £6 p/h is the basic wage so straight away that would be £12 and then materials on top of that, plus any packaging so i was maybe thinking £18-£20 for the set.
            I really thought that i made a beautiful job of the necklace and bracelet (wish i had taken a pic now!!!) and id be gutted to sell it for £12 !!!
            1) In my shop I'm often working at £5.50 per hour for pricing on my handmade items (but that's to keep them in line with the "made overseas" goods)

            2) It may have taken you 2 hours for the set but how fast were you working? Was it the first time you'd made that design etc. Factor this in as it takes longer to work out a design than to replicate it

            3) If you're packaging properly and making things to last, then you're focussing on "quality". I believe quality is the best choice in the long run, as cruddy components in = cruddy products (& "repair time"). Stick with it!

            4) With quality goods it's sometimes best to package the earrings & necklace seperately...Customers generally expect to pay £5/£6 for well packaged nice earrings...They pay £10+ in my shop for sterling, swaros & lampwork clusters etc (they take less time than a necklaces too). Add £10-£12 for a nice necklace and you're approaching your price...

            5) Write proper descriptions, if you've used genuine turquoise say so..
            Your customer may not know what Amazonite looks like, or that it's all the real stuff..If your clasps are sterling silver, say so, use your descriptions to differentiate yourself from the cheapo stuff they've seen before.

            6) DONT start cheap! It's easier to adjust your prices down (if needed)
            than try to put them up & assuming they are working at £6+ per hour why would it be fair for you to wok for less....A friend of mine put it so aptly...

            I'm a designer/maker, not a sweat shop worker!!

            Nic x
            Last edited by MuranoSilver; 23-07-2008, 08:53 AM.
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            • #7
              I agree too - if people want to buy cheap tat, let them. Doesn't mean you have to make it!
              Cheers,
              Scorch

              Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
              Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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              • #8
                Stick to your guns

                £20 for a necklace and bracelet set is excellent value

                Even better if it is made to match an outfit

                and even better than that if it is individual and not mass produced

                Tell her that's the price and you are sticking to it.
                www.beadlab.com

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                • #9
                  I always find it so hard to work out how to sell stuff for.

                  After having done 2 years' worth of craft fairs, this is what I used to sell for:

                  necklace on it's own - £10
                  necklace and earring set - £12
                  bracelet on it's own - £10
                  neckace, bracelet and earring set - £30 or a bit less if not fully beaded
                  beaded watches - £20

                  That was after listening to people's comments and feedback etc (ie, "blimey, how much?" "oooh, that's nice and it's reasonably priced too")

                  However, I make costume jewellery (plated) so I'm bound to be cheaper than sterling and gold makers.

                  You have to ask yourself how quickly you want to sell items. Okay, you might sell a necklace for £12 and not make as much money if you sold it for say £15, but people might buy 2 necklaces instead of 1 etc. It's swings and roundabouts. I always enjoyed making jewellery (sadly, don't get the time now) and was happy for it to sell slightly cheaper than I would have liked but I used to have a quick turnaround which meant I got to make more.

                  But then, what do I know?
                  Blog Website Flickr

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                  • #10
                    Lots of good advice on here... I agree with the majority. Don't sell yourself short, you know what your work is worth. Stick to your pricing scheme and don't let yourself get pressurised due to people selling cheap tat by the bucketload.

                    JBJB's points were good... it's OK to take your own pricing into consideration so that you make a small loss on some items but gain it elsewhere. The problem would be when you start judging yourself against someone else's standards, especially if they are not as high... they would make the profit, you'd be the one to lose out.

                    Si.
                    Wood Tattoos
                    Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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                    • #11
                      I agree with what others have said ~ don't sell yourself short. I agree with MuranoSilver that adding a description is a really good idea too
                      Jayne


                      "One must have chaos in oneself in order to give birth to a dancing star."

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                      • #12
                        I don't think you should lower your prices, you will always find something cheaper elsewhere and once you try and compete with claire's etc you will always loose out.
                        Try and emphasise that your stuff is not 'one season' throwaway stuff but quality jewellery made to last.
                        If you have any cheapo jewellery at home show her them both together and point out the differences.

                        Melanie

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                        • #13
                          The other thing you should think about are "loss leaders"

                          I have a range of earrings from between £4.50-£8 a pair.

                          The ones at £4.50 generally take me 5 mins to make and about £1-2 in beads - £2 for 5 minutes work!

                          The £6 ones take up to an hour to make and the beads are about £1-2 to buy, £4 for an hours work........ see the pattern!

                          The £4 ones have much quicker turn over and I make more per pair on them.

                          So the margin I make on some things can be used to supplement the other items, I look at selling prices as a whole as well as at individual items.

                          Hope that makes sense!
                          www.beadlab.com

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pebbles View Post
                            The other thing you should think about are "loss leaders"

                            I have a range of earrings from between £4.50-£8 a pair.

                            The ones at £4.50 generally take me 5 mins to make and about £1-2 in beads - £2 for 5 minutes work!

                            The £6 ones take up to an hour to make and the beads are about £1-2 to buy, £4 for an hours work........ see the pattern!

                            The £4 ones have much quicker turn over and I make more per pair on them.

                            So the margin I make on some things can be used to supplement the other items, I look at selling prices as a whole as well as at individual items.

                            Hope that makes sense!
                            That's what I was trying to say too!

                            I used to have a carousel of earrings priced at £3 a pair or £5 for two.
                            Ladies would spend ages looking at them all trying to choose, so then I'd get chatting to them and say "oh I've made a necklace from those beads here look" ....

                            I also take new products to show the mums at school and outright ask them "how much would you pay for this?" They're used to me doing it now and give me good feedback.
                            Blog Website Flickr

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JBJB View Post
                              I used to have a carousel of earrings priced at £3 a pair or £5 for two.
                              Ladies would spend ages looking at them all trying to choose, so then I'd get chatting to them and say "oh I've made a necklace from those beads here look" ....
                              Aah, the patented JBJB "hook 'em and reel 'em in" sales pitch!!

                              Si.
                              Wood Tattoos
                              Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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