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  • Wholesale stained glass supplies

    Hi all,
    I am in the process of setting up my business in painting/ stained glass etc and just wondered if anyone knows of any stained glass wholesale suppliers. I'm wanting to get my materials costs down. Ive just been buying glass in 12x12inch sheets and bought when on special offer or bought in bulk to get a discount.
    Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
    Sue
    www.artbysusanjefferson.co.uk

    Twitter @suecreative

  • #2
    Tempsford Stained Glass supply smaller pieces of glass and seem reasonably priced with good delivery. They have occasional free postage events.

    Marjorie

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    • #3
      Hi,

      I'm not sure about wholesale prices, I used to buy years ago from a shop in London, but it's long gone.

      I use Reading Stained Glass these days. The shop is lovely, and they offer a delivery service - but unfortunately no online shop - not a problem for me as I am close by, but with the fusing glass I bought the sample folders, so I can see what's what.

      I've used them for about 12 years and find them to be the cheapest and most helpful.


      K

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      • #4
        Just did a google for you and came across this site which is local to you.
        http://www.stainedglassnews.co.uk/studiosTYNE.htm
        They also have a suppliers page that I think will be useful to you.#
        http://www.stainedglassnews.co.uk/suppliers.htm

        Some 12 years ago I took a City and Guild in stained glass. I did use Tempsford and they were fine. But luckily for me there was a small stained glass supplier less than a mile from I worked then. I was able to pop in regularly and inspect pieces of glass. I loved some of the American supplies for their vibrant colours, but offhand I cannot remember their trading name.



        This mirror was my exam piece and was made up of 201 pieces of glass.

        Roger

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        • #5
          I didn't know you could do a city and guilds in stained glass - what a great course to do.
          I learned everything from books etc, but I would have loved to have studied stained glass at a college.

          Are you still working with glass Roger?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by theanimallover View Post
            I didn't know you could do a city and guilds in stained glass - what a great course to do.
            I learned everything from books etc, but I would have loved to have studied stained glass at a college.

            Are you still working with glass Roger?
            No I am not working with stained glass at present because of other projects I am involved with. I still look every day at some of the glass I have not used yet and keep thinking I must get back to it. Luckily I bought a fair number of tools including a diamond grinder and I made a lightbox to make it easier to accurately cut out complex pieces of glass.

            The City and Guilds course is usually only available at colleges, but I was lucky to see an evening class that was running the basic starter qualification. Personally having taken the course, a lot of it on basic colour mixing, history of stain glass and painting on glass is not really essential to making stained glass objects. You do have to create work with lead came and copper foil, personally I prefer copper foil as it is quick and easy to do.

            The mirror I featured was assembled within a rigid frame on some chipboard, this ensured it was the correct size and remained square for framing. For transporting it to class I had a hardboard cover held down with two bars secured using bolts and wing nuts so nothing could move. So if you are producing things regularly of set sizes, I would recomend making frames to help production times. On one web site I saw some tissue box covers and thought they would be a good seller and easy to make, the frame would speed the process and ensure the sides are all the same height.

            Looking at your website I see you are into glass fusing. This is something I never tried. From my picture framing business I get quite a lot of scrap glass and I was wondering whether this could be remelted and formed into something else. Touches of colour could be added with stain glass. What sort of temperature is needed and is it relatively easy to create moulds?

            Roger

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            • #7
              I always use tempsford, if you can get to their shop its definitely worth a look as they have lots of goodies , plus you can also get larger sheets from them. Creative Glass Guild in Bristol do larger sheets as well. Pearsons is the top London one but I think you need to be really big to shop there...and Stained Glass news is good for general info too as 'Keystamp' mentioned!
              Website: www.covegardennursery.co.uk
              Blog: www.covegardennursery.co.uk/garden-nursery-blog/
              Facebook: Cove Garden Nursery

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              • #8
                Hello Roger,

                Apologies for not replying sooner. I use special fusing glass, Bullseye 90 COE. Other fusing glass is available (Spectrum 96 COE etc), but you always need to use a glass of the same COE. So you can't mix Bullseye 90 with Spectrum 96.

                COE is Coefficient of Expansion, I'm not very good at the scientific side of glass, this is to do with the expansion and contraction of the glass whilst in the kiln. So when I buy from Bullseye's range of fusing glass, I know it has all been tested to the same Coefficientcy - so it will fuse together without any problems.

                With the scrap glass you have, as long as you use glass from the same original sheet it will fuse together ok, but if you add some coloured glass it won't have the came COE, so won't work. It could crack whilst cooling or crack or shatter days or weeks later. There are ways of testing COE, but I think you will have to buy a book! Meanwhile here is a link: http://www.warmglass.com/Glass_compatibility.htm

                However saying all of the above, I have discovered coloured glass that can be fused with float glass - but I'm not sure how it would work with your picture framing glass, here is a link: http://www.creativeglassshop.co.uk/f...-57_73_77.html
                You could phone and ask the creative glass shop they may be able to give advise.

                Just a thought, for colour you could use powder like copper oxide or mica to the glass...

                I hope I have not confused you too much!

                Karen

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