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  • some craft fair questions

    im new to craft fairs and have been told that if i attend a craft fair i need insurance. is this correct. and if it is where is the best/cheapest place to get it.
    also if anyone has any tips for attending a fair for the first time then i would really appreciate your advice.
    many thanks
    xxx
    www.myeviemyrose.etsy.com http://www.facebook.com/myeviemyroseuk

  • #2
    Hi there

    It's an important thing to have and doesn't cost too much.

    I got mine from a company called G.M. Imber based in East Grinstead, West Sussex.

    I started off with the basic policy which only cost £35.

    I'm sure other people will post and let you know of other insurance firms to consider.

    Good luck with your craft fairs
    Autumn Thyme

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    • #3
      It depends what you want to be insured for.
      If it`s Public Liability in the Venue, the Venue and the event organiser should have their own PL Insurance.
      I suspect many organisers demand people get their own insurance so they don`t have to... or is that cynical?
      I have run many different types of events and always carried my own PL / Employers Liability insurance so people attending were covered.
      However, it is a good idea to get insurance of your own if you are in contact with the Public as it`s better to be safe than sorry.
      Last edited by sit & fidget; 12-12-2012, 10:37 AM.

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      • #4
        I attend on average 2 craft fairs a week and I do not have any public liability insurance. Some craft organisers ask for it. To me it is a waste of money. In 20 years I have never had a problem. As its your first go at craft fairs BEWARE. Never take a cheque. Everything you sell is cash sales. Have table cloths that compliment what you sell and the right colour. A lot of new people go wrong by laying everything out on the tables flat. You need display stands that can be anything from old boxes to shelving units.If you use boxes then cover them, make everything attractive. A lot of things need to be at eye level. It is only recently that I started using spot lights, they made a huge difference and attracted people to my tables. If a customer is looking at something on your table start talking to them, it breaks the ice and the barriers, it puts them at ease. I sell wooden items so I tell them what its made from or i show them something similar and usually it results in a sale. Invest in your own bags to put purchases in. I also use tissue paper to wrap things up. I get the odd one that wants to pay less for an item and I always say no. It takes me a long time to make the things I display and my prices are very reasonable as customers keep telling me. Have everything priced. I see so many stalls that do not price anything and many of the customers don't like to ask. I make my prices on the computer and print them on card. I have a plastic box with divisions in for each price. Another tip is to have a sign somewhere that says, HAND MADE. Many stalls buy in everything they sell from China so make people aware that you are a real crafter. I hope this helps and I wish you every success.

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        • #5
          Can I just add that I would never do an event without PLI. People sue these days for the smallest of things and is it worth the risk when it costs as little as £35 for the year??? I have heard stories of people losing everything due to not being insured (and no this was not from any insurance companies) I believe it's a sign of a responsible trader personally.
          Sarah x

          ~ The Lilac Dragonfly- Handmade Jewellery ~

          ~ Facebook Page ~




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          • #6
            I have insurance. It's peace of mind for me.

            You also need to make sure your car insurance provider knows that you are transporting goods to craft fairs as it invalidates your policy otherwise. Even taking a business letter to the post office counts as business use. Mine dosen't charge any more though.
            full time mum and very very part time crafter.

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            • #7
              Insurance is a must the organisers are not responsible for insuring your products nor should they be. Most reputable organisers will say no pli no stall and to trade as a proper business without pli is irresponsible and if a proper business registered with the HMRC as self employed why would you not have adequate cover. A thread on here recently about insurance proved that it is needed, a display fell on a visitor, not worth losing your home or reputation. You own a car and insure it and don't expect the garage selling it to do the insuring for you so what is the difference.

              Also make sure you are registered with the HMRC as a self employed business again they do check at fairs

              Comment


              • #8
                I would never do a fair without PLI either. For a small cost, mine is less than £50 - you have peace of mind that should anything go wrong you are covered. Any reputable organiser will insist on it and ask for copies of your certificates.

                I use www.cmtia.co.uk if that helps.

                Good luck with your fairs!
                www.tracyfranciscards.co.uk

                follow me www.twitter.com/tracyf1971

                http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?...29004627180188

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                • #9
                  Absolutely you need to have insurance, I'm with G M Imber too. If you're trading legitimately and giving figures to HMRC at the end of the tax year then you can claim the insurance cost as one of your expenses. Hopefully no-one would ever need to claim against their Pulic Liability insurance, just as we hope we won't have to claim against our car or house insurance in our every-day lives but just in case, you should have it.
                  Custom tribal belly dance costumes & accessories

                  Unique jewellery for those who love to turn heads

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                  • #10
                    As for tips about selling at a craft fair, a member of the forum wrote this guide back in the summer and it's very comprehensive.
                    Custom tribal belly dance costumes & accessories

                    Unique jewellery for those who love to turn heads

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tracyfranciscards View Post
                      I would never do a fair without PLI either. For a small cost, mine is less than £50 - you have peace of mind that should anything go wrong you are covered. Any reputable organiser will insist on it and ask for copies of your certificates.

                      I use www.cmtia.co.uk if that helps.

                      Good luck with your fairs!
                      with CIMITA you bneed to check the small print as when I used them, it only covered sales that were made on market stalls / craft fairs, not those online.
                      full time mum and very very part time crafter.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tracyfranciscards View Post
                        I would never do a fair without PLI either. For a small cost, mine is less than £50 - you have peace of mind that should anything go wrong you are covered. Any reputable organiser will insist on it and ask for copies of your certificates.

                        I use www.cmtia.co.uk if that helps.

                        Good luck with your fairs!
                        with CIMITA you need to be careful and check the small print as it covers you with your stall, but not online sales etc.
                        full time mum and very very part time crafter.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Over here, I don't think any fair/market organizer, or venue owner, would dare do an event without liability insurance. A tree could fall. A rock could trip someone...lighting could be poor and someone could fall...all sorts of things...or they could allow a vendor in who does not have liability insurance.

                          If a vendor wants to protect their merchandise, it's a good idea to have the insurance.
                          You may want to weigh the cost of the merchandise against the cost of the insurance.

                          It's also a good idea to have liability insurance in case your tent blew down and whacked someone.

                          I'm not familiar with the laws governing these things in the UK. You might want to check with your Trading Standards person for the official word on whether you must have liability insurance. That's the bottom line - being sure you don't have huge financial losses if your tent, displays, or merchandise, etc., harmed someone. It IS a secure feeling to have liability coverage.

                          I don't believe that lack of liability insurance necessarily equates with being irresponsible or illegal. A person with no insurance might make the highest quality merchandise, have the world's safest booth, and pay their taxes or VAT...and care a lot about their customers. Maybe they just can't afford the insurance or are not far enough along in their fairs/markets to know yet of they want to pursue this way of business. I'm not saying they should NOT have insurance, I just am saying all this does not necessarily equate. In some cases, it might.

                          Blackwillow - so glad you posted Stephen's blog - it's great!

                          So taytotayto, I hope you have great success doing markets and really enjoy them! They are a lot of work, can be great fun, can sometimes be discouraging, but you should definitely give it a try! You just never know!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just a quick question on this thread? Sorry going slightly off topic but, I'm already self employed doing another trade, once I get out and about and start at fairs etc, obviously I plan to keep records etc.... but do I need to do anything different to what I'm doing now? Self employed is self employed right??? I don't need to kepp telling HMRC just because i'm doing something else aswell? Hope you understand what I mean?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ree1977 View Post
                              Just a quick question on this thread? Sorry going slightly off topic but, I'm already self employed doing another trade, once I get out and about and start at fairs etc, obviously I plan to keep records etc.... but do I need to do anything different to what I'm doing now? Self employed is self employed right??? I don't need to kepp telling HMRC just because i'm doing something else aswell? Hope you understand what I mean?
                              I don't think you need to let them know other than keeping the records as you already do. I teach dance too and when I called them to ask this question in relation to teaching and selling they said to put it all on the same expenses sheet. You could give them a call yourself thouh, just to double check.
                              Custom tribal belly dance costumes & accessories

                              Unique jewellery for those who love to turn heads

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