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building the worlds most iconic Viking ship

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  • building the worlds most iconic Viking ship

    I am just back from 4 days working on the most amazing ship building project in Norway. They are building an exact copy of the Oseberg ship using original techniques and tools. Starting from big logs like these. we cleft and hewed planks then steamed and fitted them all using the most gorgeous replica axes and other tools of the period.


    cleaving


    Hewing


    gorgeous axe


    This is my board you have to get it to this stage just with the axe.


    and the ship beginning to look good

    lots more pics on my blog here
    part 1 http://greenwood-carving.blogspot.co...king-ship.html
    part 2 http://greenwood-carving.blogspot.co...g-ship_15.html
    part 3 http://greenwood-carving.blogspot.co...g-ship_16.html
    part 4 http://greenwood-carving.blogspot.co...ship_2416.html
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk

  • #2
    What a fascinating project to be involved with. Your detailed explanation of the processes and the photographs make this worth reading for anyone interested in woodworking or wooden boats.

    I was surprised that you did not use an adze as I would have thought that would have assisted in the thicknessing of the plank.

    From your blogs I get the feeling that you cannot wait to go back and help. The finished boat will look amazing and so much can be learnt from attempting the old techniques.

    Roger

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    • #3
      Wow! What an amazing project to be involved with.
      george
      www.mizgeorge.co.uk
      www.etsy.com/shop/mizgeorge
      www.flickr.com/mizgeorge

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      • #4
        Originally posted by keystamp View Post
        What a fascinating project to be involved with. Your detailed explanation of the processes and the photographs make this worth reading for anyone interested in woodworking or wooden boats.

        I was surprised that you did not use an adze as I would have thought that would have assisted in the thicknessing of the plank.

        From your blogs I get the feeling that you cannot wait to go back and help. The finished boat will look amazing and so much can be learnt from attempting the old techniques.

        Roger
        You are right I would love to go back, I am full on with work in the UK till April though and they hope to finish by May. Adzes were not used in Viking times and are far slower at removing timber than axes, they are surfacing tools. Most surfacing of flat surfaces in Northern and Western Europe was done with broad axes, much easier to get a true surface since you are looking down the line of the surface as you are working.
        http://www.robin-wood.co.uk

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        • #5
          What an amazing project. Such a step back into the past. Mind you, a cheeky fleeting thought shot through my mind as I looked at the pic of you all hewing away and it was "They've taken that huge step back to the past but I bet they used an electric kettle to make their tea". Just my sense of humor.
          Did you have to make your own tools on site I wonder. They really arn't so different to todays are they.
          Carol
          God helps them that help themselves.

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          • #6
            How amazing, I'm so jealous! What a fantastic project. It's only when you've worked in the old ways that you appreciate how clever and ingenious those folk were; after all, they had to figure out from scratch loads of techniques we take for granted these days because they've always been there.

            I was lucky enough to do some Bronze Age bronze casting a few years ago (I made a sword, an axe head, a brooch) and it was wonderful. I also learned hedgerow basketry (that's when you use what you've picked rather than buy in split cane) and very primitive silver bangle making. A real eye opener when you're working in the open, using logs for tables and basic hand tools, but great fun.

            I'd love to see pics of the boat when it's finished, I'm sure you'll post some!
            Daesul

            http://www.clairemanwani.com
            http://www.folksy.com/shops/clairemanwani
            http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ClaireManwaniPottery

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Daesul View Post

              I'd love to see pics of the boat when it's finished, I'm sure you'll post some!
              Here you go she was launched yesterday
              http://www.robin-wood.co.uk

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              • #8
                WOW!!! That's awesome!! Congratulations - I know you must be very proud...the ship is beautiful and the launch was perfect!! Now what will you make? =)

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                • #9
                  now it's back to the day job, teaching bowl carving this week, spooncarving next week then back to turning bowls.
                  http://www.robin-wood.co.uk

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                  • #10
                    It all sounds great fun to me! I hope it isn't too much of a let down after the ship experience. That was interesting sounding music in the background of the video - but to me it sounded Aboriginal (as in Australia) - was it Viking music?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cosmic grammie View Post
                      It all sounds great fun to me! I hope it isn't too much of a let down after the ship experience. That was interesting sounding music in the background of the video - but to me it sounded Aboriginal (as in Australia) - was it Viking music?
                      I don't know it sounded very like Inuit throat singing to me so would not be surprised. I wasn't at the launch have been teaching, no let down there is always something fun to do.
                      http://www.robin-wood.co.uk

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