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Psychology of Buyers....

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  • Psychology of Buyers....

    Having just done a 2-day show at the weekend, I had time to watch people as they wandered round and thought I would share my observations :

    1) People who came in as soon as the event was open, didn't stop at any of the tables. Don't really know why they came in.

    2) I was squeezed in a very small space between 2 other sellers so I decided to maximise my space by having an 'L' shape with my 2 tables - one at the back and one at the side. Big mistake. Nobody would come into the space to have a look as they obviously felt initimidated.

    3) I decided to change my layout and put one table at the front and one to the side, but nobody could look at the side table because it was butted up to the other seller. However, lots more people stopped because I had a frontage table so I think they felt there was a barrier between me and them and felt more 'safe'

    4) This meant that I had to point things out on my other table but nothing really sold from that table. So after the event had finished I found an organiser and asked if I could move.

    5) The next day I did an 'L' shape again, but this time I was on the end of a row, so I had my jewellery on one table and my fabric stuff on the other table, so whichever direction they came from, they were only presented with one table of the same-type (ie, not mixed) This was MUCH more successful and I had a very good day as a result.

    6) When people came into the tent, they (generally) turned left (proving the psychologists correct!) and did all the outside tables first. I would hear them saying "Well let's have a look at everything first before we buy". However, they generally didn't go round again, so if you get a sniff of interest - pursue it coz they probably won't come back.

    7) A lot of people did the outside stalls and wouldn't bother with the inner ring - maybe something of interest to craft-fair organisers. I think this was because they'd come in the door, turn left, do the outside stalls and then the door would be in their eye-line again as they came round and they would just wander out again.

    8) If you've got a little huddle at your table, more people will come over to see what everybody's looking at ... maybe get friends and family to act as customers!!

    9) The marquee we were in was absolutely HUGE and created a lot of empty space. I think this put some people off stopping when there weren't many other shoppers in the tent, probably because they felt they were being "watched" by everybody. Again - another note for craft fair organisers, make sure the place at least looks full, space tables out etc.

    I think that's about it ... if I think of anything else I'll let you know, but I hope this is of interest!

    Emma
    Blog Website Flickr

  • #2
    Hi Emma

    What brilliant observations! Thank you! I am doing my first bead fair later this year and will take on board a lot of what you have said. One thing I have been thinking about for a long time is how to lay out my stall, what to put on it and how. I think your advice has really helped.

    I hope you made lots of money at your fair despite the need for several changes ;-)

    Fran xx
    www.hellobeads.co.uk
    Hello Beads Online Bead Shop- "Little Things, Great Joy"

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    • #3
      Really valuable information- thank you for spending so much time & trouble to share it, it really is much appreciated!
      Jayne


      "One must have chaos in oneself in order to give birth to a dancing star."

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      • #4
        That all rings so true Emma from various craft fairs I have done, well done, and glad the second day was more succesful for you as a result.
        Jo x

        For handcrafted wooden gifts and decorations please visit http://www.sommerwood.co.uk

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        • #5
          One of the things I've found at craft fairs is that if I am actually doing some peyote beadweaving, people will stop and watch. I then smile and say hello, show them what I'm working on, point to similar items on the stall, and they get to see that I do indeed make everything myself, that I don't use a loom, and that each peyote item is actually quite labour intensive. They also usually marvel at the size of the delicas.

          This way, I have already struck up a rapport with them, and I haven't even started trying to sell to them yet

          Of course, the trick is not to be so engrossed in what you're doing that you don't actually notice the customers, and because of this I usually go for either my "tortoiseshell" patterns - 5 or 6 colours, mixed up at random - or a repeating pattern.
          Melanie


          "When I talk about belief, why do you always assume I'm talking about God?" Serenity


          http://www.myspace.com/kandmcreations
          http://www.kandmbeadshop.co.uk/ | http://www.kandmcreations.co.uk/
          http://kandmcom.etsy.com

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          • #6
            Very valuable info there Thankyou. And thankyou for taking the time to post it for us. I sure many will find it of value.
            Glad to hear the second day went better for you.
            http://butterbeandesigns.co.uk/

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            • #7
              AGREE ! Spot on with the observations Emma - in a previous existence (i.e. life before bead buying) I used to run a market stall and found pretty much the same with regards to layout and peoples comfort zones. I used to set up the stand and then either stand opposite it (out the way) or pretend to be looking at something myself (curiosity always gets the better of punters and they have to come & look too!). Also, I agree with Melanie - making something 'live' also attracts people !
              I think it helps to consider how you feel yourself in a market browsing situation - what feels comfortable? what feels confrontational? Most people are dying to look but are scared they'll get the hard sell if they come too close or pick something up or they simply don't want to be disliked for not making a purchase which is why a general comment about something else (even the weather) is usually a good opener too. Its bizarre but also true too how a crowd creates a crowd. What a funny old bunch there is out there !
              Mel

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BeadsbyLili View Post
                AGREE ! Spot on with the observations Emma - in a previous existence (i.e. life before bead buying) I used to run a market stall and found pretty much the same with regards to layout and peoples comfort zones. I used to set up the stand and then either stand opposite it (out the way) or pretend to be looking at something myself (curiosity always gets the better of punters and they have to come & look too!). Also, I agree with Melanie - making something 'live' also attracts people !
                I think it helps to consider how you feel yourself in a market browsing situation - what feels comfortable? what feels confrontational? Most people are dying to look but are scared they'll get the hard sell if they come too close or pick something up or they simply don't want to be disliked for not making a purchase which is why a general comment about something else (even the weather) is usually a good opener too. Its bizarre but also true too how a crowd creates a crowd. What a funny old bunch there is out there !
                Just a little idea. when im at the stall I try to look busy. We do quite a lot of personnalised on the spot stuff. If we are not doing that I will try to look busy (not desperate) maybe look up with a smile or a hello etc Don't want to frighten them off.But then don't want to look totally uninterested. lol
                http://butterbeandesigns.co.uk/

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                • #9
                  Trying to look busy is a great idea, and its also great to talk to the customer about your product. I always try to keep smiling even if I'm not inside.

                  All that has been said about buying psychology is true,as a potential customer I would be intimidated by an empty room, or a stand with the seller on the front. I also think prices should be very visable as I get put off things if I have to ask a price especially if a stall is busy.
                  Amanda
                  xx

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                  • #10
                    On our last weekend jolly, there was a craft tent at the show.
                    I went in as a customer a few times over the weekend, and i really felt like taking all the stall holders to one side.
                    The worst thing was when you walked in the stalls were arranged around the OUTSIDE of the tent!!!!!
                    So as you were wandering around, all eyes were on you!!
                    The stall holders themselves looked really P'd off and Borrrrred, which isn't a good look!!
                    If it had been me i think i would have moved some tables about!
                    Mind you the man selling locally made wine was making a killing....
                    I got some Chocolate flavour!!!
                    http://icecreambird.blogspot.com/

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                    • #11
                      This has been a fantastic thread and what so many of you have said is so true.
                      Looking busy not fed up
                      Having a smile on your face etc
                      were your stand is located.
                      layout..............

                      What I hate is a stall holder engrossed in a book and no sign of acknowledgment to the customer.

                      As my stand is glass I tend to go round polishing items and taking care setting them out and treating them like gold....the customers watch and see you care about your product which then you can go in with how it was made and how you enjoy your work etc........before going in with the killer lines!
                      Once there hooked your halfway there!

                      I sometimes sit and make jewellery, the amount of people watching brings others to your stand.

                      I also talk to children and get them to tell me there fave colours and what they like on the stand~ the amount of children that have a good eye for colour and a genral love of art astounds me sometimes...you can see lil artists in the making.
                      So then the parents take an interest in you and your work because you have given there children some time.

                      Kids say the coolest things and make me smile.

                      I have been reading the psychology of selling too..........soooooo interesting and makes selling fun as I use the different ways put forward~interesting to see what happens!

                      BTW. Re pricing....you have a 70% better chance of selling something ending in 3 and a 50% chance of not selling something ending in 7.
                      There numbers that people like and dislike.
                      Hence most items on my site ending in 3!
                      Debbie
                      www.thesilverzebra.co.uk

                      Contemporary glass fusion designs - sculptures - wall panels - functional items - outdoor sculptures. We also run Silver & Glass workshops here in Cheshire - kiln space also offered.

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                      • #12
                        For me doing my first craft fair in October, this has been really good advice!

                        I worked for a number of years in various Kwik Saves - always on the beer counter (heheh! ) and managed to sell virtually anything as long as it looked good and was clearly price marked. Snowballs were the worst thing ever to sell, and one Christmas I managed to sell all 20 cases......

                        Being enthusiastic about your product is always a plus!!

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                        • #13
                          Being enthusiastic about your product is always a plus!! 'I agree'
                          Debbie
                          www.thesilverzebra.co.uk

                          Contemporary glass fusion designs - sculptures - wall panels - functional items - outdoor sculptures. We also run Silver & Glass workshops here in Cheshire - kiln space also offered.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            2 golden rules imho ...

                            1, You need to talk to potential customers as its not a super market..
                            If you make the stuff that what people are interested in..

                            Very very few things sell without some kind of discussion (try and think of the last time you bought something)

                            2, Smile.. lol

                            Regarding the positioning and layout it a vital consideration.. Its really worth photographing stall that work for you!
                            If you can find out who sells a lot try and find out why ?
                            .


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                            • #15
                              I went to an atiques fair months back, I was standing at this one stal wanting to look at something in a glass container so couldnt get to it myself.
                              The owmen had just made a, what I can only assume to be, a big sale with a couple.
                              Fair enough, I stood there witing for her to finsih the conversation or at least say 'excuse me a second' to break a way and just give me a bit fo time.

                              Id been there a minute,she didnt even look at me, just carried on talking.So I walked off.

                              Lovely info on kids liking colour etc, also info on numbers.Luckiyl I have 3's in alot of my work.
                              https://folksy.com/shops/GrimmExhibition


                              http://poisonedapplecraftuk.blogspot.co.uk/

                              Poisoned Apple Theatre - Handmade Crafts on Facebook

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