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  • Just another thought! = £

    Craft Fair

    Hire a hall, not all of them are very expensive, So charging on avarage 10 - 15 per head, say 10 tables = £100 - £150.00, but better still, Sell coffee and tea and hot choc £1 at cup and makes lots of profit Christmas time make mulled wine and summer make fresh lemonade mmmmmm yum.

    Never under estimate your worth

  • #2
    Remember that you have to also consider marketing and promotional costs in order to make your event a success and that there will be other costs involved such as liability insurance cover. It's not as simple as a hall of crafters and a table full of drinks unfortunately!
    Wood Tattoos
    Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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    • #3
      yes woodtattoos that is correct, but making own signs and laminating and nailing to wooden lats and planted in grass does not cost that much and is quite successful and PL insurance can cost as little as £40 so for the 1st fair maybe not as profitable but down the line there is good potential i think

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      • #4
        As one who organised a craft fair this summer I would say that it is definitely not that easy. Fun yes, but it took months of planning to get it right and umpteen hours on the internet answering and sending e-mails and dealing with requests for info etc. Worth doing yes, but if you consider the hours involved in organising something like that against your takings you might get a surprise.
        Cynthia
        http://iforjonesdesigns.website.orange.co.uk

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bentley View Post
          yes woodtattoos that is correct, but making own signs and laminating and nailing to wooden lats and planted in grass does not cost that much and is quite successful and PL insurance can cost as little as £40 so for the 1st fair maybe not as profitable but down the line there is good potential i think
          Have you done many fairs then? Your business outlook is 'refreshing', and it would be quite a help to a lot of other crafters who seem to have become tangled up in the legalities and ethics of fair and product promotion.

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          • #6
            Hi Peter

            Yes I have organised along with my sister a few fairs. Sure it hard work 1st of all, but along with word of mouth, free web advertising , establishment, good prices, open outlook, imagination etc It can work.

            Thanks for your kind comments

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            • #7
              I am currently arranging my very first craft fair and I have to say I'm finding it very enjoyable. The hall I have booked have checked with their insurance company and it so happens that I'm covered, I don't need public liability insurance on this ocassion. Yipee (save some there)

              The tea and coffee is a good idea which I have adopted, but for my first fair proceeds of that will go to charity. (I'm hoping that will draw in some more visitors to the fair).

              I agree with Bentley, advertising doesn't have to cost a lot. I am printing my own posters, word of mouth, internet, and hoping to get a free story in the local paper if they are short on print that week! Placing posters in the local supermarket, library, small shops, bakery, train station, bus station, notice boards, car window, tourist board and hand outs on the day.

              Any more ideas would be much apreciated.

              Cross fingers
              Debbie
              https://www.facebook.com/gleiniauswynol

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              • #8
                I was just trying to express the fact that craft fair organisation should not be viewed as a quick way to 'make a buck'.

                The expectations of the organisers and the exhibitors are not always one and the same. The organiser aims to fill the hall, hiring out every table to an exhibitor. The exhibitor pays for the table and then looks to sell their wares to cover that cost and hopefully make a profit.

                A good exhibitor won't stop working once they have 'sold' every table. Yes, you're right by saying that it is not a technically difficult task to put up the signs that you described but there may be a lot more effort required to ensure that the event is well attended, hoping that the signs pull in enough passing interest on the day.

                As Ifor-Jones said, a good organiser will spend hours in the run-up to the event, ensuring that there is a good balance of varied and high-quality crafts on show, advertising and promoting the event through the press/radio/internet/in the local area, responding to queries and requests, sorting out the necessary legalities and authorisation with local councils if necessary, organising a suitable layout for the event, getting in refreshments at cost, considering requests for electrical sockets or other pieces of equipment, getting tables and equipment ready in advance and ensuring on the day that all unforeseen problems are dealt with promptly and without detriment to crafter or customer.

                Search this forum and there are countless threads from disheartened crafters who have turned up at an event to find that it is full of cheap mass-produced wares that they cannot compete with... that it is not advertised correctly and only a few people turn up... stories of crafters being left to set up an entire hall on their own...

                I think that you are doing the determined and hard-working craft fair organisers an immense disservice by suggesting that it is easy and a good way to make money. I know several organisers who would disagree and I feel that most actually do it as a labour of love for all things handmade and handcrafted... to give them a public platform for exposure that they deserve.

                If you total up the profit made by an organiser against the hours of work that have been put into the event, I'd put money on the fact that for most incidences it would work out as below the minimum wage.

                I'm sure that I will divide opinion with this but I feel it has to be voiced.

                Si.
                Wood Tattoos
                Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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                • #9
                  Hi Si

                  I realise you are entitled to your opinion and I am pleased you have one.

                  I was not saying it was easy to make money organising craft fairs,
                  (Although it is not rocket science)
                  If everyone makes everything doom and gloom then no one will do or try anything and of course there are others whom do not like to see others do well or try.

                  I was merely offering advice of making extra money at the craft fairs selling hot drinks is a very good way of doing so. It was just extra advice that is all, I did not realise I was going to be chastised for it.

                  Maybe I should keep my help advice to myself

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                  • #10
                    Hi Bentley,
                    If each table seller had thier own insurance, would you still need to take out extra insurance as an organiser? or would there own suffice?
                    just thinking if someone tripped on the way out the door that would be down to the organiser I suppose?
                    Thanks... your getting me thinking now, I can imagine its hard work but I love the organising side of things.
                    Sarah

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by autumn rose View Post
                      Hi Bentley,
                      If each table seller had thier own insurance, would you still need to take out extra insurance as an organiser? or would there own suffice?
                      just thinking if someone tripped on the way out the door that would be down to the organiser I suppose?
                      Thanks... your getting me thinking now, I can imagine its hard work but I love the organising side of things.
                      The organiser needs insurance by law.. Yes the sellers need it too but i'm not 100% sure its a law for sellers but I'd "always" reccomend it.
                      .


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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 0103media View Post
                        The organiser needs insurance by law.. Yes the sellers need it too but i'm not 100% sure its a law for sellers but I'd "always" reccomend it.

                        Thanks ... oooh! this site is so good!!....lol
                        Sarah

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                        • #13
                          Hi Si. Yes I agree with you on many points that you raise just as I agree with some of Bentley's. It's not easy but I was just saying that it's enjoyable for me as well as very challenging I must add.

                          I also have to make sure that attendance is high (I'm going to be selling my handmade items also). What I want for my craft fair is high quality handmade items (not bought in) That's why I am ensuring that the stall holders make their items themselves. I have no way filled all my tables yet because I don't want too many of the same craft. I am trying to arrange this fair how I would want a fair to be if I was visiting one.

                          I attended my first fair last week and it was a disaster (items bought in!) I do not want to make that mistake myself. I think that organisers who do not make items themselves just want to make a 'fast buck' and fill the tables asap as you suggest above resulting in a poor quality fair. Crafters might handle the organising a bit better?

                          I agree with you on a lot of points you raised.

                          ps I have my work cut out for me with advertising now (but I wont give up until the craft day is over)
                          Debbie
                          https://www.facebook.com/gleiniauswynol

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 0103media View Post
                            The organiser needs insurance by law.. Yes the sellers need it too but i'm not 100% sure its a law for sellers but I'd "always" reccomend it.
                            And I'd hazard a guess (as I have before on this subject) that it would not be best practice to rely on the liability insurance of the hall or location. If someone got injured as a result of something that the craft fair organiser had set up, such as a trailing wire or a table in a dangerous location, I'd say that the representatives of the hall would not claim liability.

                            If they were able to say that they weren't liable or the incident was covered by their insurance policy, then that would leave the fair organiser possibly facing a substantial claim.

                            What price for peace of mind when there are policies out there for event organisers at very reasonable cost?
                            Wood Tattoos
                            Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by woodtattoos View Post
                              If they were able to say that they weren't liable or the incident was covered by their insurance policy, then that would leave the fair organiser possibly facing a substantial claim.

                              What price for peace of mind when there are policies out there for event organisers at very reasonable cost?
                              Yeah I best look into that actually
                              Debbie
                              https://www.facebook.com/gleiniauswynol

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