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How can I dye the Nylon stitching on cotton trousers?

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  • How can I dye the Nylon stitching on cotton trousers?

    Hi all

    I've just dyed some cotton trousers using Dylon Machine Dye. They've come out really well except the stitching hasn't taken. I'm assuming it's Nylon. Does anyone know how I can colour the stitching to match the fabric? Would cold water hand dye work?
    Thankyou
    Donna

  • #2
    Hiya Donna,

    When I was at college i kind of remember a teacher saying Nylon's a tricky one to dye. Its something to do with the level of acid in the dye.

    So I'd review what dye you got and get a higher level of acid dye?

    I don't know if this make sense or is right but best of luck!!

    Eli
    Mod deleted signature - crafts only please

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    • #3
      I had a similar problem when I used the dye that you don't use with the washing machine. At first it seemed to take quite well but not really totally, but as I washed it you could tell more - the thread was green whilst the rest was dyed black. I think my dye was Dylon too. Sorry I can't suggest something but I haven't found the answer yet either!
      www.jwuniverse.co.uk

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      • #4
        I don't believe there is an answer - nylon won't take the dye as well as cotton, if it takes it at all...
        Cheers,
        Scorch

        Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
        Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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        • #5
          No. There is an answer and it is acid.
          And about the colour 'biting' at a specific temperature.
          I've lost the page but out there on the interweb is a super page explaining all. I think I googled 'dyeing acrylic'.
          AnnieAnna

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AnnieAnna View Post
            No. There is an answer and it is acid.
            And about the colour 'biting' at a specific temperature.
            I've lost the page but out there on the interweb is a super page explaining all. I think I googled 'dyeing acrylic'.
            AnnieAnna
            Basic wash in dyes like dylon are set up to dye cottons and polycottons, but the nature of the dye is that different fabrics will take up (or resist) the dye, and you get issues of incompatible fibres producing unusual results (there has been another thread running about dye issues which you should perhaps read too).

            As AnnieAnna says, there are ways to make the dye work better on other fabrics, but you then run the risk of overdyeing the original garment, or weakening the fibres.. I think probably you have to put up with some jaunty "contrast" stitching on your cotton trews!!

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            • #7
              Ooo yes - I'd better tell you about the time I used sanderswood and my balls of wool fell apart as if nibbled into sections by mice and the time I bleached wool and it completely dissolved and I did acrylic but I only managed to tone it down a shade. (If you read the other thread you'll see me ranting about Dylon and switching my allegiance to Omega dyes.)

              I wouldn't take any of my advice if I were me

              AnnieAnna

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              • #8
                Hiya this has happened to me too, but i quite liked the effect! I read somewhere recently that you can buy both the cotton dye and a polyester dye and apply them together (at the same time). I can't personally vouch for this as I haven't tried it, but it may be worth a go if you can find the dye cheap enough..
                *I Love Handmade*
                www.littlemillie.folksy.com
                www.urbancraftdesigners.etsy.com
                http://www.flickr.com/photos/littlemillie/

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                • #9
                  Depending on the colour you are dying, you can get sharpie pen and colour in the stitching to match. Works very well if it is black, but there are lots of other colours of sharpie pens.
                  They are also great for covering up scuffs on shoes wher the colur has been scratched off. Can't you just tell I'm a cheap skate!
                  full time mum and very very part time crafter.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lovewhatamymade
                    I had the same problem dying a white t-shirt navy - to make the contrast stitching look on purpose, I added 3 white squares to the chest area and used navy stitching... you could maybe add a green patch on it somewhere?
                    sneaky but clever!

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