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  • teacup candles

    I had fondly imagined that all I had to do was glue a length of wick to the bottom of the cup pour in some melted wax and Bob's Your Uncle.....

    I can see you all giving knowing smiles....she'll learn.... And I am learning fast, that there is so much to learn.

    The first thing I have found out is about the wick and that the size depends on the diameter of the cup. Does it matter that the bottom of the cup is often half or even less the width of the top of the cup ? And if so, what do I do about it.

    I guess this is the first of a thousand questions I will be asking in the next few weeks. But I am keen to learn so I am apologising in advance.

    Sandra

  • #2
    Originally posted by sandmor1 View Post
    I had fondly imagined that all I had to do was glue a length of wick to the bottom of the cup pour in some melted wax and Bob's Your Uncle.....

    I can see you all giving knowing smiles....she'll learn.... And I am learning fast, that there is so much to learn.

    The first thing I have found out is about the wick and that the size depends on the diameter of the cup. Does it matter that the bottom of the cup is often half or even less the width of the top of the cup ? And if so, what do I do about it.

    I guess this is the first of a thousand questions I will be asking in the next few weeks. But I am keen to learn so I am apologising in advance.

    Sandra
    Hi Sandra
    Welcome to the forum and sorry not have have responded to your post sooner. As you have no doubt found out wicking a container is one of the most difficult things to do.
    It's really difficult to answer your question concisely. Containers that narrow significantly are always problematic however, if you don't wick for the widest part of the tea cup the candle will tunnel (leave increasing amounts of wax residue stuck to the sides of the cup) so, in my experience you have to wick the cup with the smallest wick that gives you a full melt pool and accept that the candle will be over-wicked when it reaches the bottom.
    Please don't apologise for asking questions we all have and still do!
    Good luck and keep us posted on how your candles go.

    Isabel

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    • #3
      Hi there, I make a lot of tea cups and wicking is difficult but Ill agree with Isabel here and say you need to wick to the widest part of the cup. When I have under wicked it does tunnel and can cause the wick to get swamped and go out it that makes sense. What does become difficult is when you have a 12cm wide tea cup which with soy wax is very hard to wick (and where I am now). A lot of customers tend to buy tea cups as decorations mind but you cant assume this is the case so have to make sure its done just right.

      Steph
      http://www.etsy.com/shop/pilipalahandmade?ref=si_shop

      http://folksy.com/shops/PiliPalaHandmade

      http://www.facebook.com/pages/Pili-P...35963279769487

      http://pinterest.com/pilipala83/

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      • #4
        Thank you very much for this info.

        I got my package of supplies delivered last evening from c4 but as it was going on for 7pm I decided not to start anything until today. I have to walk the dog first, then shopping and then I am free to start.

        I have read a lot and downloaded a couple of ebooks to my Kindle so here goes...wish me luck

        Sandra

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