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Is it necessary to wash???

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  • Is it necessary to wash???

    Last night I poured 4 jar candles.

    Two are for potential customers (squeal!) and the other 2 for yet more testing. So I used 2 new jars and re-used 2 I've already used for testing.

    I am paranoid about blocking my sink and despite all the good advice about pouring washing up water through sieves etc I still don't wash out my jars/plastic tealight cups. I heat the jars in the oven, then upend over a soup tin to let the wax drain. Finally when they are cool enough to handle I wipe out with kitchen roll. These I use for retesting.

    So here's the scoop: this morning I can't tell which jar is which. Well I do know because I left the lids beside the new ones but, other than that, there is no difference. Obviously the wax that's left is melted by the heat of the new wax when I pour so, providing there isn't a lot of wax left, does it matter that I don't wash the jars?

    (I get the outside clean by buffing up with kitchen roll)

    The floor is open - let's have your comments for "No Wash Marion", the Mankiest Chandler in Town!!!


  • #2
    Well the subject header made me click

    Well done with the sale!

    I'm just starting out and very worried about wax in the sink. I have some polycarb tealight holders that i've used and want to clean for testing. Would the previous scent linger in the used holders?

    It seems like a waste not to use them again.

    Hope somebody with more knowledge than me comes along with an answer for you soon...
    Please come see me on:

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    Or on my blog Candles From Home

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Anna Rose View Post
      Well the subject header made me click

      Well done with the sale!

      I'm just starting out and very worried about wax in the sink. I have some polycarb tealight holders that i've used and want to clean for testing. Would the previous scent linger in the used holders?

      It seems like a waste not to use them again.

      Hope somebody with more knowledge than me comes along with an answer for you soon...
      I think the negligible amount of wax remaining wouldn't influence the scent of the new pour but I haven't tried it yet. Like you, I'd be interested in other comments/suggestions.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd be inclined to wash them, after melting and wiping as much off with a paper towel as possible first. I'm also worried about blocking the sink and I get the feeling I'm going to be using a lot more sink unblocker these days. But I think if you wash them in the a full bowl of hot soapy water, the small amount of wax that is remaining will become so diluted with the suds and hot water that they probably won't become be a huge threat to the sink pipes anyway but then I'm not a plumber so what do I know

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MarionT View Post
          Last night I poured 4 jar candles. Two are for potential customers (squeal!) and the other 2 for yet more testing. So I used 2 new jars and re-used 2 I've already used for testing.I am paranoid about blocking my sink and despite all the good advice about pouring washing up water through sieves etc I still don't wash out my jars/plastic tealight cups. I heat the jars in the oven, then upend over a soup tin to let the wax drain. Finally when they are cool enough to handle I wipe out with kitchen roll. These I use for retesting.So here's the scoop: this morning I can't tell which jar is which. Well I do know because I left the lids beside the new ones but, other than that, there is no difference. Obviously the wax that's left is melted by the heat of the new wax when I pour so, providing there isn't a lot of wax left, does it matter that I don't wash the jars?(I get the outside clean by buffing up with kitchen roll)The floor is open - let's have your comments for "No Wash Marion", the Mankiest Chandler in Town!!!
          I wash my jars and tealight holders by submerging them in a large pan of rapid boiling water for a few seconds . The wax melts and floats out of the container leaving just a cleanup with some kitchen roll. When they're all cleaned I pour the water into a bucket and leave it to cool. You can then remove the cooled wax and dispose of it without fear of any of it getting anywhere near your plumbing

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          • #6
            I think I would be tempted to empty the water into the garden, not into the sink. (Paranoia)
            Please come see me on:

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            Or on my blog Candles From Home

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Anna Rose View Post
              I think I would be tempted to empty the water into the garden, not into the sink. (Paranoia)
              Me too! Our Victorian sewer is always blocking about 100 yards from the house and the men look to see what the cause is. Can you just imagine if everyone heard a plug of wax had been responsible?

              Thanks to everyone for the replies - much appreciated.

              Marion

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi,
                I reuse tins and find my over pan veg steamer comes in very handy. If I'm getting rid of left over wax I sit the tins in the steamer to melt the wax then use kitchen roll (I'm buying shares at the first opportunity!) to wipe round and absorb the wax. Then I turn my tins upside down to steam the inside which in theory should clean and sterilise them. Another wipe round with kitchen roll and although no longer sterile certainly clean and ready for reuse.
                Cali xx

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                • #9
                  I'm with you on the kitchen roll, Cali. I go through miles of the stuff.

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