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How to reuse Beeswax candles?

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  • How to reuse Beeswax candles?

    Hi,

    I've been given bags (haven't weighed yet, but loads!) of beeswax candles, all from a church and will have a regular supply. How do I reuse?

    I was thinking of melting them down and then sieving any bits out, pouring into foil lined roasting tins to set into blocks. Then use in candles later.

    Is that going to work?

    Thanks for any advice.
    Please come see me on:

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  • #2
    Not a massive user of beeswax myself (wish I could afford to be!), so I'm not really clued up on such things.
    BUT, as long as you don't overheat the wax when melting to strain it, I'm sure it will do no harm and the wax can be successfully used again.

    Are they 100% beeswax candles you've been given?

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    • #3
      Don't know about reusing for candles but if pure beeswax then a great furniture polish. Even if just paraffin wax then that could be used for sealing wood.
      Pat Murphy


      http://www.gladturnings.co.uk
      https://www.facebook.com/GladTurnings.Woodturning

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Anna Rose View Post
        Hi,

        I've been given bags (haven't weighed yet, but loads!) of beeswax candles, all from a church and will have a regular supply. How do I reuse?

        I was thinking of melting them down and then sieving any bits out, pouring into foil lined roasting tins to set into blocks. Then use in candles later.

        Is that going to work?

        Thanks for any advice.
        I'm no expert but I should have thought that the method you described would work, as long as you're sure it is 100% beeswax.

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        • #5
          I re use bees wax and bees wax and paraffin candles all the time not problem.


          Just make sure you keep any different coloured wax seperate so you don't get weird distorted colours unless that's what you require.

          Don't forget to pick out the old wicks you won't be wanting to try and re use them.

          Oh for the person who said they wish they could afford beeswax I'll let you into a secret get to know a bee keeper as they will often give you bees wax for free as they are more interested in the honey.
          So many projects, so little time

          http://folksy.com/shops/eileenscraftstudio

          http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fol...92535377497013

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          • #6
            Hi there,

            Don't heat the beeswax above 85 C as it will discolour and lose it's lovely scent. Other than that you should be fine

            It's a nice hard wax that shouldn't smoke or drip too much. Nice and simple to work with and it doesn't need added fragrance.

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            • #7
              Thanks for the advice.

              The older candles look more beeswaxy (?), and I have done some research on the company that is producing the modern candles and they are only 25% beeswax (assuming rest paraffin wax).

              Going to have a play and see what results I can get.
              Please come see me on:

              Facebook
              Twitter

              Or on my blog Candles From Home

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