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  • difference??

    Do you really notice a difference with most FO's when using 8% vs say 10%? I have tested and tested using a soy paraffin blend that recommends 8% and I dont notice one bit of difference in any of the eight scents I use. Why is such a big deal made with regard to FO percentage ratios? Is it really a fire hazard to use more than the recommended amount? If that were the case, Im sure that people would be getting sued left and right...thoughts?

  • #2
    Originally posted by chmelina View Post
    Do you really notice a difference with most FO's when using 8% vs say 10%? I have tested and tested using a soy paraffin blend that recommends 8% and I dont notice one bit of difference in any of the eight scents I use. Why is such a big deal made with regard to FO percentage ratios? Is it really a fire hazard to use more than the recommended amount? If that were the case, Im sure that people would be getting sued left and right...thoughts?
    Hi there.

    I use purely soy and 9%. The reason for this is I wanted a fabulous hot throw (I started with tealights which are small so throw less than, say, a jar). I was aiming at the quality end of the market, charging a little more. Customers have raved about the fragrance.

    It's possible I could get away with less. However, I have found some FOs are stronger than others and I'm afraid if I dropped below 9% some customers say using larger rooms, might notice the tealights aren't as strong as usual and question whether they are worth the extra. I'm aiming for the Wow factor, every time.

    Also, I think 9% classes a candle as "triple-scented" (Spencer? Isabel?) which is a nice selling point.

    Finally, I think I'm just too afraid to change anything. My tealights work well and I've had QUITE a hassle with my jars so not changing a thing! Just in case ...

    Re other reasons for using more than 10%, I'm not sure but I know there are problems. I wonder if flammability and stability might be reasons which more highly-fragranced candles have problems? Cost is definitely one of them - FO is so much more expensive than wax.

    Not sure if that helps but good luck with the testing.

    Marion

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    • #3
      We use between 8% and 10% and I agree with Marion, we're not prepared to fix what ain't broken! Just in case :P
      I was given a candle to smell by a customer the other day and you could barely get anything from it, not even enough to be able to identify what fragrance it might have been. If we were to use less than what we do now I'd be afraid that our fragrances (or at least a naturally weaker ones) might fall into that criteria.

      We have noticed that some of our heavier fragrances at 10% can sometimes sweat a bit, bit this doesn't effect the burning and is also affected by the temperature in which the candle is kept. It's just one of those things and doesn'y happen every time - another quirk of handmade items! We haven't had any other 'imperfections' though.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by LauraShayler View Post
        We use between 8% and 10% and I agree with Marion, we're not prepared to fix what ain't broken! Just in case :P
        I was given a candle to smell by a customer the other day and you could barely get anything from it, not even enough to be able to identify what fragrance it might have been. If we were to use less than what we do now I'd be afraid that our fragrances (or at least a naturally weaker ones) might fall into that criteria.

        We have noticed that some of our heavier fragrances at 10% can sometimes sweat a bit, bit this doesn't effect the burning and is also affected by the temperature in which the candle is kept. It's just one of those things and doesn'y happen every time - another quirk of handmade items! We haven't had any other 'imperfections' though.
        I've just responded to another post on wet spots saying let's use the "imperfections" to stress the hand-made/hand-poured aspect of our candles, as opposed to mass-produced.

        I think "quirks" (good word, Laura!) are good. It's a bit like organic fruit/veg - we don't buy it for how it looks. Long live squint candles!!!

        Marion

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        • #5
          When I have tested at 10% and above my flame gets very 'jerky' and the candle smokes awfully! I think the FO load would have to be very high before it is at risk of catching fire but as has been said before- use just what you need to get the best throw without any unwanted side effects!

          C

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          • #6
            Thanks for all the replies. Its interesting because I have even tested a candle with 25% FO just purely out of curiosity and I saw no significant difference in "perfermance." Maybe a bit more smoke, but thats it. I use 8% for the most part due to cost. I wonder how much FO it would take to ignite? I have asked this before and get so many answers. Its funny because some people say use only the recommened amount of FO and other say use as much as 2 ounces per pound. Is there a golden rule to this? I asked a company..I wont mention any names...and they said FO wouldnt catch fire no matter how much you used. Thoughts??

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            • #7
              I think CandleMan may be in a good position to advise on the "how much FO it would take to ignite" scenario as he has his own range of FOs and therefore presumably has had in-depth conversations with the chemist types that produce it for him.

              Personally I'm wondering why the fascination with how much it would take...? Unless you're purposely trying to make a candle that will ignite in this unsafe manner, surely it's best to stick to 10% or less, especially as you've tried well over double that amount and have found no significant improvement in scent throw.

              As for the "golden rule".. I doubt there is one. Candle makers will say 2oz/lb (or 12%) is fine, because they've tried and tested it and know it can work. However the companies that supply these goods need to cover their own backs a little and therefore want you to stay well within safe limits in order to avoid being taken to court if something did happen to go wrong.

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              • #8
                LOL...I just want my candles to be safe. I was just experimenting for the fun of it with the 25%. I used a very small amount of wax for a small jar. I use 8% with my candles and that works just fine.

                Originally posted by Spencer101 View Post
                I think CandleMan may be in a good position to advise on the "how much FO it would take to ignite" scenario as he has his own range of FOs and therefore presumably has had in-depth conversations with the chemist types that produce it for him.

                Personally I'm wondering why the fascination with how much it would take...? Unless you're purposely trying to make a candle that will ignite in this unsafe manner, surely it's best to stick to 10% or less, especially as you've tried well over double that amount and have found no significant improvement in scent throw.

                As for the "golden rule".. I doubt there is one. Candle makers will say 2oz/lb (or 12%) is fine, because they've tried and tested it and know it can work. However the companies that supply these goods need to cover their own backs a little and therefore want you to stay well within safe limits in order to avoid being taken to court if something did happen to go wrong.

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