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FO Blending & Testing

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  • FO Blending & Testing

    A few questions:

    1. when people are testing FO, are you testing individual new fragrances separately in one candle?

    2. Say you had an idea for blending two fragrances, would you test each one and then test them combine totalling 3 candles?

    3. When combining and testing what are you looking for?

    4. Have any of you found a good method for blending? E.g say you wanted to blend vanilla and lemon - how do you decide upon your quantities? Do you do scent building on a cotton wool pad and then make the scent up from that?

    I bought some Flaming Candle company supplies scents, jugs etc and also some scents from candle making supplies UK. I am hoping to make up some tests this weekend.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by CANDJ View Post
    A few questions:

    1. when people are testing FO, are you testing individual new fragrances separately in one candle?

    2. Say you had an idea for blending two fragrances, would you test each one and then test them combine totalling 3 candles?

    3. When combining and testing what are you looking for?

    4. Have any of you found a good method for blending? E.g say you wanted to blend vanilla and lemon - how do you decide upon your quantities? Do you do scent building on a cotton wool pad and then make the scent up from that?

    I bought some Flaming Candle company supplies scents, jugs etc and also some scents from candle making supplies UK. I am hoping to make up some tests this weekend.

    Thanks!
    Hi there,

    I haven't successfully blended any fragrances. My attempts all ended up smelling like toilet cleaner. I tried quite a few and recorded how many drops of each I used and let them sit for a few days in sealed containers.

    The only thing I can say I learned (other than I wasn't good at it!) was that both lavender and pine are very strong and overpower other fragrances.

    I buy ready-blended FO from Scent Perfique on the grounds that they are better at it than me. But I wish you lots of luck in your blending. It'll be fun and you might have some fantastic results.

    Marion

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    • #3
      This is an interesting question.

      I was thinking mixing the fragrances together like it was a perfume,so on cotton pad. Keeping notes of ratios, then when i'm happy with the smell upscale the ratio and make some test candles. Check that the fragrance still works well when used in wax.

      However, haven't tried this out yet as just learning, so hopefully one of the very experienced chandlers here will enlighten us
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      • #4
        Originally posted by MarionT View Post
        Hi there,

        I haven't successfully blended any fragrances. My attempts all ended up smelling like toilet cleaner. I tried quite a few and recorded how many drops of each I used and let them sit for a few days in sealed containers.

        The only thing I can say I learned (other than I wasn't good at it!) was that both lavender and pine are very strong and overpower other fragrances.

        I buy ready-blended FO from Scent Perfique on the grounds that they are better at it than me. But I wish you lots of luck in your blending. It'll be fun and you might have some fantastic results.

        Marion
        I swear as I read this I could smell pine scented toilet cleaner!
        Please come see me on:

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Anna Rose View Post
          I swear as I read this I could smell pine scented toilet cleaner!
          (chortle)

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          • #6
            Haha the toilet cleaner thing was what worried me. Looking at candle making FO suppliers, I noticed that the scents seem to be done with no room for creativity which is part of the fun. I was wondering if anyone had successfully blended them. I've tried with cheap FO in body oils etc and not noticed ill effects most of the time. However, they sometimes can smell awful or one overpowers the other. Lavender definitely can blank out other fragrances. It is often listed as a base as well as middle and I'm convinced its more the former.

            Anna Rose - I learned the method you have but Guivudan (sp?) won't be calling anytime soon. I find the ratios so confusing and the conversion from parts to ml grrr!

            I think I will try blending as I bought scents like blackberry, pear and rhubarb which would be boring solo.

            thanks for responding. People don't often talk about scent blending.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CANDJ View Post
              .


              I think I will try blending as I bought scents like blackberry, pear and rhubarb which would be boring solo.
              You're right - I hadn't thought about it but those might be a bit dull on their own. Really looking forward to hearing about the results.

              Marion

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              • #8
                Fingers crossed. One observation I've made on preliminary sniffs of scents - Flaming Candle company's smell much better in the bottle than candle making supplies uk's do. FCC have the rhubarb and sweet pudding and blackberry, they smell edible. CMS are only for adding to wax but smell less like what they are intended to be. Will probably change when they are made into candles.

                well now I have loads of scents to test so I will be back when I gain results. Scary being a novice!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CANDJ View Post
                  Blackberry, pear and rhubarb which would be boring solo.
                  Oh I'd disagree! I love the fruity smells on their own!

                  OK, you can start the pie flinging now....

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Spencer101 View Post
                    Oh I'd disagree! I love the fruity smells on their own!

                    OK, you can start the pie flinging now....
                    But an apple candle sounds much duller than apple and French vanilla or apple, lychee and pear.

                    also could I ask - when people say they use 10% frag, they do mean 10% of the amount of wax don't they so if I have 200g wax - I find 10% of that and get my frag amount? Whenever I read up on it I find people talking about tea and tablespoons to be added to what seem like large amounts of wax.

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                    • #11
                      SOUNDS much duller, but IS it duller? I'm a stickler for clean crisp defined scents, so that's what I go for. It's not what I make as I understand the need to cater to the customer rather than to my own tastes. All I meant was, a pear fragranced candle would be more appealing to me than a pear and cinnamon one. I'm a man of simple needs...

                      You're spot on. 10% FO/EO load in a 200g candle would be 20g of fragrance.
                      Many of the older websites and guides to making candles talk about measuring fragrance in 'spoons', but I presume this is because a good hearty scent throw wasn't what people were looking for then. Nowadays it's what 90% of people are looking for so we up the ante and make them smellier.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CANDJ View Post
                        Apple, lychee and pear.

                        See, now THAT I would buy! Fruity, with none of those 'woolly' smells like vanilla.....

                        Although saying that, the plum jam cookie fragrance I have is delicious!!!

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                        • #13
                          Lol plum jam and cookie would make me eat it! I see what you mean but beyond vanilla on its own, I never see such simple candles and the higher end ones always seem to have top, middle and base usually consisting of things that sound way too expensive and rare for me. I am going to be testing single scents so rhubarb way well stand alone. I had ambitions of using my limited supplies to try to create an English spring/summer garden.

                          thanks for your advice. Of course once you release your e book more will become clear to amateurs like myself

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                          • #14
                            I know what you mean about higher end scents, Jo Malone does a pear and freesia (base patchouli) , and a blackberry and bay (base cedarwood) which I'm sure are gorgeous,and out of my reach!
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                            • #15
                              Grrr! I just made a mini votive and used 35g wax and 2.8 g frag at 8% in that Flaming Candle Company iMelt 100% soy container wax. The candle is solidifying now but it looks very greasy on top. Like a swirly greasy film on top. Is that too much frag or frags that are just not right for the wax? Unfortunately the supplier sites don't list usage amounts for waxes or frags. Frags are from candle making supplies uk. I'm wondering if 7% plus in soy is too much when it comes to some suppliers and maybe people using higher amounts are not using fragrances which are higher quality?


                              ETA: reading around here, this company's fragrances percentage is 2-5% yikes! I was well over.
                              Last edited by CANDJ; 29-01-2013, 04:02 PM.

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