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  • Scented Chunk Pillar Candles

    Morning all,

    I just have a question in relation to making scented chunk pillar candles with paraffin wax. Would I need to scent the chunks when I make them as well as scenting the overpour?

    Thanks,

    Audrey

  • #2
    I tend to scent the chunks.
    http://www.facebook.com/rugeleycandles

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    • #3
      Great thought I might need too.. Can you tell me do you find the citrus oils have a weaker scent throw or is it just me

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      • #4
        Sorry to barge in on your post Audrey, but I was just wondering about the scenting of chunk candles. Are people using the same scent for the chunks and the overpour or could you use one scent for the overpour and one for the chunks, would this technique work well (provided you had scents that complimented each other ), has anyone tried it?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Auds120 View Post
          Great thought I might need too.. Can you tell me do you find the citrus oils have a weaker scent throw or is it just me
          hello,

          i have found that citrus oils do not last very long at all. made some lovely lavender orange candles, but now all that i can smell is lavender. i recently picked up some litsea cubea oil to try - it smells very lemony & is supposed to last a lot longer than regular citrus oils.

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          • #6
            In aromatherapy terms citrus oils come into the top note category, top notes have the shortest shelf life of all oils (esp citrus top notes) and the shortest scent life, when exposed to air. Lavender is a middle note, so its scent will last for longer. I'm starting to think that using base oils might be the best way to go for longer, stronger smelling candles for this reason.

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            • #7
              I was wondering if you should mix a fragrance using top,heart and base note in candle scents the same way as perfume. This might give a complex fragrance with a longer lasting scent, for citrus maybe:

              Grapefruit or Mandarine (top),Rosemary,lilac or lavender (heart), and Amber,cedar,or Moss (base)
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              • #8
                Originally posted by squeakyclean View Post
                Sorry to barge in on your post Audrey, but I was just wondering about the scenting of chunk candles. Are people using the same scent for the chunks and the overpour or could you use one scent for the overpour and one for the chunks, would this technique work well (provided you had scents that complimented each other ), has anyone tried it?
                Barge away I only recently started making chunk pillar candles and I hadn't been scenting the chunks which more than likely (now in my opinion) didn't allow for a great scent throw. Will scent my chunks the next time I attempt one, hadn't actually thought of doing the mixture but think I might try it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Auds120 View Post
                  Barge away I only recently started making chunk pillar candles and I hadn't been scenting the chunks which more than likely (now in my opinion) didn't allow for a great scent throw. Will scent my chunks the next time I attempt one, hadn't actually thought of doing the mixture but think I might try it.
                  Barging here too and wondering if it's worth the extra cost of FO added to the chunks, if the main part of the candle is scented? Just a thought. The FO is by far the most expensive part of my candles. Not making chunks yet but learning from all your comments. Thank you!

                  Marion

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NorCalGirl417 View Post
                    hello,

                    i have found that citrus oils do not last very long at all. made some lovely lavender orange candles, but now all that i can smell is lavender. i recently picked up some litsea cubea oil to try - it smells very lemony & is supposed to last a lot longer than regular citrus oils.
                    Thought I had mixed my scents wrong because like yourself I mixed lime with lavender and at the start I could get the lime scent but nearer to the end of the candle all I could smell was lavender. Am going to give it another go and change the ratio I used the last time when mixing the two scents, and test away

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                    • #11
                      I haven't made a chunk pillar but have made a chunk votives and only scented the chunks with a plain overpour giving a good scent throw.

                      Ix

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                      • #12
                        I wonder then if just scenting the chunks would work in pillars, but I think I might just test using only scented chunks.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MarionT View Post
                          Wondering if it's worth the extra cost of FO added to the chunks, if the main part of the candle is scented? Just a thought. The FO is by far the most expensive part of my candles. Not making chunks yet but learning from all your comments. Thank you!

                          Marion
                          Making a scented chunk candle and fragrancing both the chunks and the overpour would theoretically work out the same cost, from an FO/EO perspective, as making a regular scented candle. If you consider regardless of whether is was a chunk candle or not, it's going to have the same amount of wax involved and therefore the same amount of FO/EO.

                          If you make a 1kg pillar that is 500g chunks and 500g overpour, at 10% FO/EO load, you're still going to be using the same amount of FO as a regular 1kg pillar.

                          Depending on how "chunky" you make the candle, you may find that more of it is chunks than overpour (this is dictated by both the size and shape of the chunks and how you stack them), so you if you're only going to fragrance one or the other, you could argue that it would make more sense to fragrance the chunks and not the overpour in some cases and of course the other way round in other cases..

                          I often make fragranced chunks and a plain overpour due to the fact that some FO/EOs affect the colour of the overpour and if you're looking for a predominantly white candle with coloured chunks... well you can see where I'm going with that.

                          To answer some of the other questions in this thread:

                          Yes mixing and matching fragrances does work IF you get complimentary smells. I had a customer that always wanted chocolate orange chunk candles from me. Absolute nightmare for me because although I love fresh citrus scents, I cannot stand chocolate candles and am a huge believer that chocolate and fruit do NOT go together!!! (chocolate & bacon on the other hand work very well together, although as a foodstuff rather than a candle! Weird I know!)

                          I know nothing about top, middle or bottom (slushy or otherwise) notes. I know there are some that don't work well together, but this knowledge only comes from testing, and smells are highly subjective so what works for one may not work for another. Never really tried mixing them up too much as I'm a plain and simple type of fella.

                          One thing I will say is, FO/EOs smell one way when they're just oils and often VERY different when burning in a candle. So although you may mix lemon and thyme FO/EOs together and they smell awful when raw, they may smell heavenly when burning in a candle. This is just another aspect of the craft that requires (cover your ears Marion) testing, testing testing. In my opinion, this is the reason tealights were invented! To test possible fragrance combinations without breaking the bank.

                          Anyway, enough of my widdering. I've got kids to put to bed and a bottle of Sancerre that is just crying out for the corkscrew!

                          Happy Friday all

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Spencer101 View Post


                            (chocolate & bacon on the other hand work very well together, although as a foodstuff rather than a candle! Weird I know!)
                            I can confirm that this is the truth. While sheltering from the wind atop a munro, one Easter, the 2ndborn and I discovered the delights of chicken & jaffa cake rolls. Of course it might well be that you'll eat anything when you're tired and cold but it was truly delicious.

                            Marion

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                            • #15
                              Jaffa Cakes are strictly forbidden in my house.. Chocolate AND orange in the same mouthful is the handy work of El Diablo himself! BLEURGH!

                              Chicken and orange works well and even at a push chicken and chocolate. But not all three together!

                              Pass me the second bottle of plonk, I feel it's going to be one of "those" evenings

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