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adding sustainer to silicone mould candle; how?

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  • adding sustainer to silicone mould candle; how?

    Hi all; well, I'm embarrassed to ask this as it's probably a very simply answer but how do I add a sustainer to a silicone moulded candle once it's removed from its mould? I used a wick pin whilst making, and thread the wick through the hole, then kept the wick tight by resting the wick pin over the top/bottom of the candle. On releasing, obviously the bottom of the wick doesn't have a wick sustainer, how do I add a sustainer? I thought it would be a simple process of heating a sustainer up, threading it through the wick and gently pressing it into the bottom of the candle, but I can't crimp it closed this way... Am I being dense?


  • #2
    Don't really know the answer to this but perhaps if you add the sustainer to the end, crimp it and then thread it through the candle??
    Isabel

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    • #3
      thanks for the reply. the candle has already set around the wick as it's in place as I pour. I suppose I could add the sustainer below the wick-pin prior to pouring and then pour up to the level of the wick pin/sustainer...?

      does anyone have experience of this?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DaCosta View Post
        thanks for the reply. the candle has already set around the wick as it's in place as I pour. I suppose I could add the sustainer below the wick-pin prior to pouring and then pour up to the level of the wick pin/sustainer...?

        does anyone have experience of this?

        Shows you what I know about moulded candles!

        I've looked at a couple of candles I have at home that I believe were from moulds and they don't seem to have sustainers in, in fact the bottoms are completely sealed.

        Isabel

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        • #5
          There are two ways of making pillar candles... well two ways of wicking pillar candles anyway.

          The first way is using wick pins like you use in votive moulds (but longer ones) that you remove from the wax and then put the wick in their place after. Don't get many moulds like that in the UK, in fact the only people I know to use them are some of my American chandler friends. These are usually only for metal moulds.

          The other way is what you've done. You put the wick in the mould then pour the wax around that.
          In this method, you don't use a sustainer at all. The wax and the wick are bound together meaning the wick cannot fall out of the candle.

          Just ensure if you're selling your candles that you make the user aware to burn them on a suitable container (like a shallow bowl that will catch any spillage) and not to burn it past the last inch.

          Simple as that

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          • #6
            thank you. i'm not used to not having sustainers so it feels a bit weird leaving it out. I'm not sure my customers would listen to the advice not to burn them past the last inch. very few people actually know how to burn a candle!
            at least i know it's not me being an idiot!

            i've managed to fix a sustainer to the one i have as it's a thick wick and the sustainer was a very snug fit. i then heated the sustainer and melted it to the bottom of the candle. whether this will work or not, i'm not sure!

            For my next try, I might just try and set up the sustainer below the wick-pin assembly next time and see if I can pour around it and thereby lock it into the bottom of the candle (I shouldn't be able to see the sustainer then, but it's there for safety).

            as always, thanks for your help

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