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What not to do....

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  • What not to do....

    At Christmas someone gave me a crafted candle from a local market. It was beautifully presented, and smelled lovely (lavender). It was labelled and I did what I fear so many people do - read it without reading it (so I don't recall who made it). It said "remove all packaging before burning" which I did - although the sellotape attached to the bottom of the candle holding the wick in was a bit annoying as when I pulled it off it pulled the wick out. I was silly really, I slid the wick back in and then lit the candle after placing it on a suitable container.

    I can only assume the maker had not properly tested their wares as after about 2 hours the candle (the melted wax) burst into flame. I was able to extinguish it and was left with a hard powdery residue in the bottom of my container.

    I am not casting any doubt on anyone here, merely pointing out the importance of thoroughly testing your products. And sadly I did have to tell my friend that the candle she had bought for me in good faith was potentially dangerous (I have put the soap, made by the same person, in the bin I'm afraid) so that she doesn't buy from them again.
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  • #2
    yikes that is scary. you're right. any responsible candle-maker will test their products thoroughly for that exact reason. for the sake of time and a used candle it's not worth rushing it.

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    • #3
      Wow, so scary. Could have caused much bigger problems.
      You were lucky.

      James x
      www.facebook.com/CraftyCath

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      • #4
        WOW! I'm astounded!
        The first sign of trouble brewing for me would have been the sticky tape holding the wick in place!

        What type of candle was this? A pillar or a votive?
        If the wick slid out of the candle then it was more than likely made with a wick pin. In that case the wick should have been fitted with a sustainer, NOT taped to the bottom of the candle. Even if it was a small votive candle, where the wicks are often added after demoulding, the wick should be attached in such a way that it cannot fall out, NOT with sticky tape!

        When you say the wax burst into flames and left a hard powdery residue at the bottom of the container, do I take it that the candle was burnt right down to the last when it burst into flames? If so, for all you budding newbies out there, use long necked sustainers so the flame goes out before the candle gets to this point!
        Most likely this happened with this candle as by the sound of things there was no sustainer which meant the flame could get right down to the bottom of the container where all the flammable stuff likes to hide!

        It's a shame you threw the packaging away as this particular chandler perhaps needs a few pointers on candle safety and perhaps they need to be advised that their insurers will weedle out of any potential payment if the candles were unsafe in any way!!

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        • #5
          It was a pillar candle, about 3 inches. It did have a wick pin and I wasn't alerted by the sellotape as it also held the makers label in place and was attached to the plastic surround (which ( discarded).

          The candle didn't burn down the to the last, there was a good inch or so of melted wax in the bottom of my container and when it had cooled there was a thin layer of wax sitting on top of the harder, powdery residue. I need to dig out the soap my friend got me as that was also lavender and then I'll check with her whether she bought them from the same place. Maybe the way I can track down the maker and let them know what happened.

          As has been said the consequences could have been much worse.
          Custom tribal belly dance costumes & accessories

          Unique jewellery for those who love to turn heads

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          • #6
            I think candlemakers should pass some sort of safety assessment, it seems people are getting kits , then within a few weeks have a website and are selling to the public

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