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Silicone molds, pillar molds!

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  • Silicone molds, pillar molds!

    Hey there

    Spencer thanks for your help last time sorry I never got back to you. I wanted to ask anyone, i was told that i can only use soy wax in silicone molds, is this correct? I have blended parriffin wax and have ran out of soy wax so wanted to double check the answer to this question.

    I also would like to know, I bought candle dyes from 4 candles and there are only a few types for soy wax. Am i able to use my other dyes in soy wax is it just that they come out lighter?

    I have also bought pillar molds which i have been using and i do like how they have come out but i seem to get wax stuck to the mold making the candle look rustic. It is ok to have some like that but how do i make them have a smooth coating? I have been greasing the tins with olive oil, is that okay and have you got anymore advice for me please?

    Thanks in advance
    Lou

  • #2
    [QUOTE=louxxx20;560190]Hey there

    Spencer thanks for your help last time sorry I never got back to you. I wanted to ask anyone, i was told that i can only use soy wax in silicone molds, is this correct? I have blended parriffin wax and have ran out of soy wax so wanted to double check the answer to this question.

    Hi Lou
    I'm still a novice in the candle making field but I believe, and I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, that you cannot use blended wax in silicone moulds because it contains stearin which causes the mould to rot. However, you can use paraffin pillar wax or, I think, unblended paraffin wax.

    I also would like to know, I bought candle dyes from 4 candles and there are only a few types for soy wax. Am i able to use my other dyes in soy wax is it just that they come out lighter?

    I use 4C's dyes in soy without problem, it's just as you say they turn out slightly lighter and creamier.
    Hope this helps

    Isabel

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    • #3
      Originally posted by louxxx20 View Post
      I was told that i can only use soy wax in silicone molds, is this correct?
      Hi Lou, nice to see you back.

      Your question could be taken two ways?

      Can you only use soy wax and no other type of wax in silicone moulds?
      Can you only use soy wax in silicone moulds and no other type of moulds?

      I'm presuming you mean the first one(?)

      The answer is, no, you can use paraffin wax in silicone moulds too. If you have paraffin wax that is blended with stearin you should avoid latex/rubber moulds, but I use it often in silicone moulds with no obvious ill effects to the mould.
      The trick is to make sure the mould is actually silicone and not latex as stearin will very quickly rot a latex mould.

      There are some unscrupulous sellers out there that advertise their moulds as silicone when they're not! Naughty naughty!
      This happens more with the fancy shaped ice cube trays that I often use to make chunks or melts, but I've seen a few "silicone" moulds that are blatantly not too.


      What type of moulds do you have? Are they fancy shaped pillars?


      Yes you can use the 4C's dye in soy, but it will give a much paler hue. You could use more dye to give a more intense colour, but the frosting that some soy waxes give will be much more obvious.


      The pillar candles you have made with this "rustic" effect, were they from soy wax or paraffin? Was it a pillar blend?

      I've never used olive oil myself for "greasing" a mould. I prefer turning it into salad dressings
      When using paraffin for pillars I very rarely find the need to use any kind of mould release as the shrinking properties of paraffin are such that it practically releases itself from the mould.

      If you want a nice smooth/shiny finish to your pillars, pour hot then put the mould in a cold water bath.
      Set it up so the water level, when the mould is in the water, will come up to just above the wax level but not so far that it will overflow into the mould itself. You'll need to weight the mould down in some way because it will still be slightly buoyant. You don't want to leave it in there until fully cooled, just long enough that the wax sets for 5 - 10mm round the side. You can then take the mould out of the water bath and cool in the normal way, poking relief holes where necessary.

      As for more advice... practice practice practice!
      Many people are a little scared of trying pillars because they're seen as more complicated than container candles, but in my honest opinion I find them far easier to perfect.

      When I started I melted 1kg of wax and dyed it to make imperfections easier to see and poured. Then when I wasn't happy with it I melted the same wax down and poured again. Kept going like that trying the many different effects you can achieve in pillars and just melting the same wax over and over again. I must have made about 30 or 40 different candles with this same wax (hardest working wax in town it was!) and by the time I'd done that I was comfortable with many different techniques, had learned lots about differing pouring temperatures and more importantly, learned what does not work! So give it a go and let me know how you get on...

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm still a novice in the candle making field but I believe, and I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, that you cannot use blended wax in silicone moulds because it contains stearin which causes the mould to rot. However, you can use paraffin pillar wax or, I think, unblended paraffin wax.

        Sorry Lou ignore what I said re silicone, thanks Spencer for the correct info!

        Ix

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        • #5
          Hi Isabel,

          It's just the natural rubbers that stearin rots. Silicone is fine. Well that's what I've found anyway.
          I have a silicone mould shaped like a pastry case that I've used stearin blended wax in many many times over the course of three years and it still produces perfect results to this day

          However, I have some ice cube trays that I was sold as silicone and went ahead and used stearin in. After just the first go it was obvious that something wasn't right and turns out they're natural rubber. It very quickly loses its elasticity and flexibility and then just tears. The wax kind of grips in there almost as if the two have bonded slightly.
          Not happy about that either as a couple of the moulds I'd paid a pretty penny for! Still, you lives and you learns eh?

          With a little practice you can tell the difference just by touch and now I only buy silicone ones.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for your help guys! I tried the cold water bath for a candle and it worked but caused a bit of a funny look at the top of the candle.

            Spencer I am having major trouble with all my candles dipping a lot. I always leave some wax back to re pour when the wax has set but i do not understand why they are dipping like they are. For soy wax I wait till the wax is 60 degrees or less to pour and I use the same method for blended parraffin wax I pour slowly so I do not understand why this keeps happening. Please could you give me some advice on how to avoid this from happening?

            Also have you got any more advice for me for making my candles smooth as like i said the water bath didnt work for me. However I will try again.

            Thanks for all your help

            xx

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Lou,

              When you say the candle looked 'funny at the top', funny in what way?

              As for the wax dipping when cooling... Nature of the beast I'm afraid. Wax expands as it heats then contracts as it cools. The surface sets and as the wax in the middle of the candle cools and contracts it pulls that set surface down causing the dipping.

              This can prove a little tricky to avoid. You could pour cooler which means less contraction but if you're using an intricately shaped mould it can lead to air bubbles being trapped on the candle surface. So best to pour hot and top up when cooled.

              In metal moulds you can pour cool which will cause a less tan shiny surface to the candle, but you avoid that by giving the mould a zap with a heat gun which helps melt the surface imperfections. Not sure I'd recommend trying that with latex moulds though...

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