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Fragrance Oil Flashpoint

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  • Fragrance Oil Flashpoint

    Hello,

    This is probably a REALLY stupid question but I have been adding FO to soy wax (container blend) at 84 degrees Celcius, cooling to 43 degrees then pouring.

    Tonight I was browsing Scent Perfique's FOs and looking for Lemongrass as a customer has asked for it. I hope it's ok to post a link here. You'll see that the Flashpoint is given as 53 degrees Celcius:

    http://www.scentperfique.co.uk/moreinfo.asp?id=200

    My concern is, if I add FO to was which is over 80 degrees, obviously it will cool the wax a bit but the overall temperature will definitely exceed 53 degrees initially. In fact, I thought I HAD to add the FO at a hot temperature to ensure that the structure of the candle is at the correct stage in order to absorb the oil so a hot throw is given (I think Spencer told me this but could be getting mixed up).

    So, is there a danger that my pot of wax could ignite when I add the FO? Thanks!

    Marion (Dumbo at the Science Bit)

  • #2
    Don't panic Marion, flash points are the point the fragrance would ignite if it was exposed to an open flame

    Flashpoints are mainly for gel candles or for shipping on planes, hence why my black cherry scent comes on a boat lol

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    • #3
      Hi Marion,

      I wouldn't be too concerned about it. As wicky posted, its more about shipping etc.. But make sure to be careful when first using it, you should have a fire blanket to hand when making candles, but for this first attempt make sure it is at hand. I don't mean to scare you or anything, besides if its being sold as a candle fragrance it must have passed certain tests to be available for sale.
      David Bolger - CEO of Endless Green Group Ltd
      Retailer, Distributor and Manufacturer of Hobby, Craft and Pastime supplies

      Candle Making Supplies
      http://www.thatflamingcandlecompany.com


      Bolgers Woodworking Supplies
      http://www.bolgers.co.uk

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi again Wicky and Candleman,

        Just mulling over your responses (thanks so much for them!) and wondering what the problem with shipping FOs is. I would have thought they would travel in the hold of a plane which is always cold, isn't it? I buy mine in the UK so it's not really an issue but I am interested in why this might be a problem.

        Marion

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        • #5
          Flash point isn't about shipping although the flash point is used to determine if the item is hazardous or non hazardous for both transport and disposal (and probably for other reasons too). There are two methods of flash point. One is closed cup, one is open cup. The closed cup method holds the vapour in an enclosed vessel and is exposed to the flame periodically. The open cup simulates what would happen if the item is heated and left in the open environment eg when a candle is in a warm room or when the wax is being heated. The UK definition / break point for shipping or disposal as non hazardous for flammable is flash point 55 degrees centigrade. If the items is used or stored above this temperature it will set fire on exposure to a naked flame or spark. I used to do both of these tests in the lab to determine flash point.

          Just notice comment about items in a plane. A lot of hazardous material ie oxidising, flammable, explosive etc can set on fire if they come into contact with a spark or they can react when they come into contact with each other. A lot of chemical sites I work on ban nylon clothes or fleece tops as these can set off a flammable atmosphere. Electronic car keys and mobile phones can also set off explosions. A lot of sites ban lap tops, phones, keys etc from site to prevent explosions. Special spark free phones have to be used. Imagine spmething setting on fire on a plane....not a nice thought. Sorry if my post is long but I felt I had to let you know the science bit. Someone almost blew me up one day by answering his phone while getting me a sample from a 20T flammable liquid tank so this subject is a bit close to the bone. people just don't see the risk until its too late.
          Last edited by Incognito 1; 10-01-2013, 08:22 PM.

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          • #6
            Wow, Craftychez, you certainly do know your stuff. Thanks for your very detailed explanation.

            Marion

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            • #7
              MarionT - thanks for letting me know I haven't annoyed you with my long winded post. I can't help with all technical / legislation queries but I've been in the industry thirty years and I run my own business as a consultant on waste, recycling and the technical /scientific side of things.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Craftychez View Post
                MarionT - thanks for letting me know I haven't annoyed you with my long winded post. I can't help with all technical / legislation queries but I've been in the industry thirty years and I run my own business as a consultant on waste, recycling and the technical /scientific side of things.
                Not in the least! I'm grateful for all the help here and I did ask the question!! It's good to know that, alongside the bumbling amateurs like me, there are people with skills, knowledge and vast experience we can all learn from. And, for me, it does help to have REASONS for why things are done a particular way. I'm more likely to remember it that way.

                Do you make candles?

                Marion

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