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Scent throw.....the truth??????

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  • Scent throw.....the truth??????

    Keep thinking that my last post was or should have been my LAST post :-) but I've just come back from a meeting discussing a photo assignment with a pharmaceutical company and I had a very interesting conversation that I would like to share. Plus I would love to hear your comments spyder, spencer et al.....

    right here goes......

    When talking about smelly things he mentioned that the human nose becomes accustomed to any and all smells within an average time of between 6-10 hours. (Apparently for dogs they have 150million receptiles *spelling* more than humans, so there time is measured in mins!!!!!!).

    So with candles when we complain that Yankee candles lose there smell, or this and that candle lose there smell.......they don't actually. We just become accustomed to it.

    He went on to say that for example when you walk into somebody's house who have dogs and it smells but they don't think it does, or when you tell someone they have B O and they look surprised. They have all gotten used to it.

    So over to you. He's saying that any candle over a 10 hr burn time is a waste in terms of smell.

    Note to all readers these are not my thoughts as I'm really naive to all this I'm simply the messenger, so don't shoot me :-)

  • #2
    Yes I would probably agree to that info

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    • #3
      It's true that the nose does adapt to smells. However to keep the flame from getting too big and to get the most from a candle, it's recommended to only burn for a maximum of 4 hours at a time, before putting a candle out. Therefore that 10 hour mark should never be reached.

      If he's saying that he burns candles for 10 hours in a row, then he not getting the best out of his candles. I'm hoping he's not leaving them unaccompanied as that's a long time to be sitting near a candle without leaving it.
      Stephen
      Website - Soy of the North
      Blog - If Soy Candles Could Talk
      Twitter - random thoughts
      Facebook - more random thoughts

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      • #4
        Yes I have heard that people become accustomed to smells but did not know that it happened so quickly. I do wonder whether that is why some people can wear SOO much perfume.
        www.mydandelionmind.wordpress.com
        Thoughts are a bit like weeds - they keep growing all over the place and you cant get rid of them easily.

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        • #5
          Ah just admit it, you've been bitten by the candle making bug and can't stay away

          150million? Even more than that! Humans have circa 5million "olfactory receptors", dogs have circa 200+million!

          But you raise a valid and interesting point.

          Ever notice how if you sit on a hard floor after a short time you forget that you can feel it? And not just because you've got 'numb bum'! Or how if you stare at the same point on a wall, everything around your point of focus tends to fade into nothing? Or how you hardly notice that humming noise your fridge makes until you have a power cut and it stops then everything seems so quiet? Or (and this is my favourite) you drink enough beer that it stops tasting like beer? Well exactly the same thing happens your olfactory receptors after a relatively short period of time.

          Our conscious brain take in as much information as it needs to assess the surroundings and then hands over monitoring responsibility to the subconscious brain. Control comes back to the conscious side of things if/when circumstances change.

          Imagine going into a chocolate making factory and the assault on the senses that would give you. At first the smell of chocolate would be VERY intense, but after 10 minutes you'd be quite used to it and after half an hour or so you'd probably hardly notice it (consciously). If you then put a chocolate bar right under your nose and took a deep whiff, although consciously trying to smell it you would be hard pushed to really notice it. This is because your olfactory senses have passed on enough information for the brain to know what to expect. If someone however then put a rotten fish under your nose you'd certainly smell that.

          During the candle making process you expose your nose to high levels of potent scent and your brain stops registering the smell after a short while. This is part of the reason you should leave your candles for a while before testing them for scent throw (the other part being the curing time). It takes your sense of smell quite a long time to return to normal levels, thus enabling you to fully appreciate the full bouquet!

          This is also why it's a good idea to hand sample candles to friends and family for testing. So long as they live elsewhere and weren't around when the candles were being made, their sense of smell will be unadulterated by those particular smells and will notice the scent throw far better than you will.

          According to some people you can 'reset' your olfactory receptors by overloading them with a different smell, almost like when food tasters use a contrasting or very neutral flavour to 'cleanse the palate'. Fresh ground coffee is supposed to be great for this. A few deep whiffs allegedly does wonders. Not tried it myself, but that's purely because I don't like coffee...

          And now that I'm aware this brief post has turned into a bit of a science lesson, I shall toddle off to bed.
          But all you coffee loving candle makers out there, give it a go and report back

          Nite all..

          S.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for your replies. He did mention perfume also. He said that when we compliment women for how well they smell and they act all pleased. That feeling comes from one of, for want of a better word shock. As they have over a number of weeks and months become accustomed to that smell. Similar to when you walk into big department store and the perfume sections hit you, and you wonder how can the staff work in those conditions....but there used to it.

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            • #7
              Right I declare that I win this years award for the most intense spencer reply :-)

              I haven't been bitten by anything. But this whole process is insane. With my clients I take a image and that's it. Black and white etc. yeah there might be a little Lightroom or photoshop but not rocket science.

              This guy was a freak (in a nice way) bit like that Heston blumenthal fella!!!!!!!!

              As an aside all this is fun isn't it. Creating a work of art every time you pour. Never ever under sell your products and or services. You guys are artists.

              BUT if my new scientist friend is correct forget about any candle for smelly sales benefit being more than a 10 hour burn time.

              Oh and just for spencer. Google says bloodhounds have the most at 250 million....bloody hell :-))))))))))......and where's me pint :-))))))

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by soyofthenorth View Post
                It's true that the nose does adapt to smells. However to keep the flame from getting too big and to get the most from a candle, it's recommended to only burn for a maximum of 4 hours at a time, before putting a candle out. Therefore that 10 hour mark should never be reached.

                If he's saying that he burns candles for 10 hours in a row, then he not getting the best out of his candles. I'm hoping he's not leaving them unaccompanied as that's a long time to be sitting near a candle without leaving it.
                Tis a very important and great point that you make. In terms of time he said a period as opposed to continuum. So I'm guessing its not distinguishing between the two? Your thoughts are very much appreciated to me and I'm sure anyone who reads this thread.

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                • #9
                  Noticed how companies are now marketing home fragrances that change scent every 4 hours or whatever the figure is. But I actually thought it was a lot quicker than 10 hours but hey ho :P

                  I think I bought their clever marketing ploy. Maybe with this knowledge a multi-pack of scented votives may be in order.....

                  Spark an Idea?
                  David Bolger - CEO of Endless Green Group Ltd
                  Retailer, Distributor and Manufacturer of Hobby, Craft and Pastime supplies

                  Candle Making Supplies
                  http://www.thatflamingcandlecompany.com


                  Bolgers Woodworking Supplies
                  http://www.bolgers.co.uk

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                  • #10
                    I am confused, my olfactory senses are hammered every day and I can't smell what I work with but if i buy a long lasting candle i burn, smell, enjoy, extinguish. I may get used to the fragrance but then someone new will come into the room and enjoy the fragrance. I may then the next day burn a different candle and not get the part burned candle out for a week, and even if I can't smell the candle i am still enjoying the candle and then i may leave the room and when i go back in I smell the candle again, i have never burned for more that 4 or 5 hours.

                    I enjoy fragranced candles because they are often a distraction for my senses, same with wax melts.

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                    • #11
                      "This is due to a phenomenon called sensory adaptation, which is not yet fully understood. During sensory adaptation our brain adapts, recognises the constant smell is not dangerous and stops identifying it so it is not overloaded with redundant information. Our olfactory sensory neurons also adapt to the repetitive odorant stimuli by reducing their rate of firing. Therefore we perceive the smell to be fading, allowing us to adapt to our environment and perceive new smells."

                      ok so I nicked/borrowed the above. Interesting that the author suggests that it's "not fully understood". So it's open to interpretation. Does begs the question though with all the posts on here regarding scent throws whether or not it is such a issue for you artists. I'm seriously very impressed with what you guys are doing.

                      Off to go get some smelly fish to test on my three dogs. Don't think the mrs is going to be impressed when she gets home....having said that after a few hours she'll get used to it :-)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CandleMan View Post
                        Noticed how companies are now marketing home fragrances that change scent every 4 hours or whatever the figure is. But I actually thought it was a lot quicker than 10 hours but hey ho :P

                        I think I bought their clever marketing ploy. Maybe with this knowledge a multi-pack of scented votives may be in order.....

                        Spark an Idea?
                        I thought it would happen quicker than 10 hours too. Sniff 10 different scented candles one after another. By the time you hit the third or fourth your sense of smell will start to malfunction. Coffee can be a good cleanser. A sniff or 3 of a coffee jar can help "reset" your senses allowing you to smell what your senses and brain had switched off from.

                        As for fragrance switching. It sparked an idea a while ago and I brushed upon it in my epic wax thread earlier this year. January will see the prototypes being tested.
                        http://www.facebook.com/rugeleycandles

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                        • #13
                          The coffee idea never really worked for me, Maybe because my whole office smells of it.

                          But I do always find it funny when we have a customer or new delivery driver coming to the offices and saying "it smells nice in here doesn't it" everyone in the office has the confused look on their faces like "what smell?"

                          Tell you what I found to be a good senses cleaner, Linseed oil. I should explain that my new job in the new year is making Paint and the like, so I have a lot of strong smelling chemicals. Not that I advise sniffing them :P
                          David Bolger - CEO of Endless Green Group Ltd
                          Retailer, Distributor and Manufacturer of Hobby, Craft and Pastime supplies

                          Candle Making Supplies
                          http://www.thatflamingcandlecompany.com


                          Bolgers Woodworking Supplies
                          http://www.bolgers.co.uk

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