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  • Scent Throw

    Oh dear the old eternal problem of producing smelly candles when they are lit!

    Firstly there is not a great deal of difference between manufacturers in the attributes of soy wax, so most manufacturers should perform ok, here at the Norfolk Candle Company we use NGI excel because it has added oils which assist the prevention of wetspot.

    There are additives you can add if you are using synthetic fragrance oils, however its best to test the oil to achieve the highest possible oil inclusion, although the manufacturers talk about 7-10% in reality to achieve a good throw with a synthetic oil , you will get better results with ratios of 15 or even 20% oil, this is what the professional candle companies do, if you can do this without additives all the better, but remember each oil is different, so has different responses.

    Alice at scent perfique will tell you they use 15% ratio to produce their candles, so you see its a universal problem, I am sure she will thank me for improving her fragrance sales, but as they say, you get out what you put in.

    The problem occurs with the waxes ability to retain this oil evenly without sweating or cracking of the wax, that is when like the pros you put in additives. 4 Candles sell a polymer called Bipol X which allows up to three time the oil content, but if too much used the wax will not let the oil go, and then no smell.

    This additive changes the structure of the wax similar to stearin or vybar, and can dry out the oil so much that you again get wetspot and it holds onto the fragrance and defeats what you are trying to do, so limit how much you use.

    Vybar improves scent throw and prevents sweating similar to Bipol X and half a teaspoon per 500 grams is sufficient.

    Whenever we produce scented candles we prefer vybar, but if we can, we make our candles with essential oils , without additives and add 10-12% , which is slightly more than the guideline 7%.

    So Basically you need find a way to add more oil and cure the side effects, then you will get smellier candles.

    PS. do not heat wax after adding fragrance, add when its cooling and stir firmly, but without creating air bubbles.

    Hope that all helps

  • #2
    My answer to scent throw was to make potpourri using the same scent as in the candles, and sell along with the candles...a nice dish of potpourri sure did the trick for scenting an entire room!!! And the candles added coziness. =D

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    • #3
      Wowsers thats a lot of fragrance. I currently use Rapeseed wax and do about 8% scent. I don't add any additives into them though. I get quite a good scent throw, although it usually takes about half an hour for the scent to permeate a room.

      Using that amount of fragrance dramatically changes the costings of the candles though, you are in effect double the amount of scent. I use Jo at Sensory Perfection and for my larger candles you're looking at an extra third onto the cost price, thats definitely something to think about!
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      • #4
        I'm new to candle making so I'm testing testing and testing. I use EOs and can anyone explain to me why I get a really good scent throw when i create a wax tart out of the remaining wax and why I don't get a scent throw in my votive glass container with the same wax (although I got a really good melt pool).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by joules View Post
          There are additives you can add if you are using synthetic fragrance oils, however its best to test the oil to achieve the highest possible oil inclusion, although the manufacturers talk about 7-10% in reality to achieve a good throw with a synthetic oil , you will get better results with ratios of 15 or even 20% oil, this is what the professional candle companies do, if you can do this without additives all the better, but remember each oil is different, so has different responses.
          If you are using Soya Wax then you should not be adding additives. To put it simply, Polymer Additives like Vybar and Bipol-X are plastic or plastic derived resins and completely goes against the idea of using Soya Wax.

          Manufacturers use high quality Fragrance Oils in order the keep the volumes lower. The candles I produce are made using between 4% and 8% high quality fragrance oils and have no issue with hot or cold scent throw. Add over 15% FO is very dangerous as FO is highly flammable and would be to concentrate to burn safely.

          Originally posted by joules View Post
          Whenever we produce scented candles we prefer vybar, but if we can, we make our candles with essential oils , without additives and add 10-12% , which is slightly more than the guideline 7%.
          This does not make much sense to me....

          Natural Soya Wax + Essential Oils = Natural Candle
          Natural Soya Wax + Essential Oils + Plastic Resin = Not Natural Candle (<-- Would be better off using Paraffin Wax as it gives a better scent throw at lower FO %'s)

          Originally posted by joules View Post
          So Basically you need find a way to add more oil and cure the side effects, then you will get smellier candles.
          Like I mentioned above, Using higher quality FO's would also cure this problem. I know many people on here get a good scent throw from Candle Shack FO's
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          • #6
            Personally I use Soy wax with no additives (as CandleMan says, it goes against the ethos of Soya wax to me). I use high quality FO's at 8-9% and get great hot and cold throw (the opinion of my customers as well as my own opinion).
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            • #7
              But aren't FOs synthetic and using them goes against the idea of making natural candles?

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              • #8
                Yes, EO's are the only way to have a truly natural candle. However, for me the cost made using them prohibitive so I went for the next best thing, which is FO.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by IndigoChick View Post
                  Yes, EO's are the only way to have a truly natural candle. However, for me the cost made using them prohibitive so I went for the next best thing, which is FO.
                  A I'm just starting I haven't considered the cost yet and I'm more concerned about the scent throw effectiveness as from what I'm reading FOs work better.

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