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Buying paraffin wax - in the supermarket!

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  • Buying paraffin wax - in the supermarket!

    I've been buying my paraffin wax off 4candles, but I've recently worked out that it's actually cheaper to buy supermarket candles and melt them down!

    Saves on postage, plus the wax is actually cheaper in the first place.

    Anyone else do this?

  • #2
    Originally posted by JohnP View Post
    I've been buying my paraffin wax off 4candles, but I've recently worked out that it's actually cheaper to buy supermarket candles and melt them down!

    Saves on postage, plus the wax is actually cheaper in the first place.

    Anyone else do this?
    Can you do the same with IKEA candles?? - many of theirs are ridiculously cheap

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are only using the wax the make candles for yourself there isn't a problem. If you are buying the wax to melt and sell them on then I wouldn't advise it. You can't guarantee what is in the wax or what quality the wax is so you wouldn't be able to guarantee a safe burning candle for sale and with these days of litigation you could end in a sticky situation.

      HTH.

      Lisa

      Bowed Over
      Handmade Dog Collar Accessories
      www.bowedover.co.uk

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by candles by lisa View Post
        If you are only using the wax the make candles for yourself there isn't a problem. If you are buying the wax to melt and sell them on then I wouldn't advise it. You can't guarantee what is in the wax or what quality the wax is so you wouldn't be able to guarantee a safe burning candle for sale and with these days of litigation you could end in a sticky situation.

        HTH.

        Lisa

        Me "melting wax" is a sticky situation at the best of times.. I remember blowing eggs as a child, then me and mum threading wicks though the shells, and pouring molten candles in to make egg candles.. Mum "lost" the old saucepan we used.. cant think why....

        Comment


        • #5
          It's an interesting dilemma - I assume most of these commercial candles (Tesco, IKEA etc) are imported from Asia/China. I find it difficult to understand how the candles can be produced, scented, packaged and dispatched here for a few pence each. It does make you wonder what would be found in any analysis of the wax? Maybe I'm being too harsh and they are just produced very efficiently!!!

          I would certainly agree with Lisa and tread carefully with any 'recycling' if you are then going to put your name on it.

          Oddsox

          Comment


          • #6
            hahaha, yes and if you went into industrial levels of production, it would be pretty embarrassing in the supermarket!

            I've got to say though, the wax from the supermarket (Morrisons) seems cheap and high quality. I think the main reason it's so cheap, is because supermarkets buy in huge quantities and pass on their savings. Obviously though, it's not something you can do if you are in business.
            Last edited by JohnP; 27-04-2009, 05:20 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              .............. I suppose to be fair to the supermarkets, they must have a level of quality control on what they allow to be sold in their stores. It's not going to be good long term business sense if you don't 'vet' what is being sold.

              Oddsox

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JohnP View Post
                I've got to say though, the wax from the supermarket (Morrisons) seems cheap and high quality. I think the main reason it's so cheap, is because supermarkets buy in huge quantities and pass on their savings. Obviously though, it's not something you can do if you are in business.
                You will find Morrisons, Asda's, Ikea's and most other cheap candle suppliers will come from China. There is legislation trying to get passed to try and stop the dumping of mass produce candles over here. You can read this article and it tells you a little more. Basically there is no import duty at all on candles and because Europe hasn't yet set up anti dumping procedures we are getting them.

                Another reason they produce candles so cheaply is the wax in itself is not the most expensive part of a candle the Fragrance Oil is. The way they get round this is by taking a big blob of plain unscented wax and dipping it in a vat of coloured scented wax. What this does give you a very thin layer of colour and scent which smells great in the packaging. Ever wondered why a candle smells great in the wrapper then you get it home and you can't smell it - that's why it only takes minutes to burn through that layer. Turn a cheap candle upside down and you will see what I mean you will see the thin layer. Having said that they are getting a bit clever now and making labels that cover the bottom of the candle now.

                Hth.

                Lisa
                Bowed Over
                Handmade Dog Collar Accessories
                www.bowedover.co.uk

                Comment


                • #9
                  I read a while ago about another way of 'scenting' candles (container). Produce a plain (coloured) candle and while is is setting add one drop of fragrance oil to the top around the wick. Anyone smelling it will get a strong scent and the first 30 mins of burning will also get a good waft of scent and then..... back to plain wax.

                  Very cheap way of acheiving fragranced candles me thinks but not for me!!

                  Oddsox

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes, I think once you start adding scent, you are playing a different ball game.

                    Some of the cheap candle scents aren't very nice at all!

                    Thanks for the article Lisa, that was interesting.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by candles by lisa View Post
                      If you are only using the wax the make candles for yourself there isn't a problem. If you are buying the wax to melt and sell them on then I wouldn't advise it. You can't guarantee what is in the wax or what quality the wax is so you wouldn't be able to guarantee a safe burning candle for sale and with these days of litigation you could end in a sticky situation.

                      HTH.

                      Lisa

                      if its been passed to be sold in big supermarkets then wouldnt it be safe to be melted be reused?

                      Visit my online shop
                      http://pinkscentation.misi.co.uk/

                      Comment

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