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Beeswax tealights gone pearshaped, please help a total beginner!

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  • Beeswax tealights gone pearshaped, please help a total beginner!

    Hello there everyone

    I've just introduced myself in another forum and am desperately hoping someone might be able to tell me why my first batch of candles have gone completely wrong and just won't burn! :-(

    I used the metal cups and wicks from shop bought tealights, removed the wax and refilled them with a gorgeous mixture of pure beeswax and tons of expensive essential oils (plus a little wax crayon melted in to add colour and some glitter sprinkled on top). Other than the fact a couple of the candles split right down the centre in varying degrees (can only think these were the candles I added more wax crayon to in order to get a darker colour) they look beautiful and are all supposed to be gifts...but I just tested a couple and the wick won't stay alight :-( Any ideas why?

    I once went on a beeswax candlemaking workshop several years ago and I remember the tutor saying the width of the wick had to be correct for the width of the candle otherwise it wouldn't burn properly...but I'd assumed if it worked for tealight wax then it'd work for my yummy concoction too...apparently not! Is it perhaps because I didn't dip the wicks in beeswax (though they're already coated in the tealight wax)?

    Any suggestions or ideas would be really gratefully received...thank you :-)

    FG XXX

  • #2
    I expect one of our clever candle-makers will be along soon with a better answer than me!

    But in the meantime, I was just wondering whether, if you kept lighting it when it went out, it would eventually carry on burning? I know I have had to do this with sop-bought ones before, so it isnt necessarily that you have done something wrong!

    C x

    Comment


    • #3
      I use soy wax so I have no idea what beeswax is like to work with. However there are a few basic guidelines that apply to all waxes.

      It sounds like your wick is drowning. You said you used tons of EO, how much did you use? What was the ratio? Using a high fragrance load will cause your wick to drown. I use an 8% FO that means for every pound of wax I add just over 1.25oz of FO. With EO I think you have to use a lower ratio. I've not experimented with EO yet as they're expensive and not all of them work well in soy.

      Also crayons are not the best way to colour candles. Crayons contain pigments which will clog up the wick and drown out the flame.

      Of course, it could also be the size of your wick. What wick did you use LX, ECO, CD, etc.

      Sorry there's lots of questions but the more we know about what you did the better we can put you on the right track.

      HTH.
      Ruby xx



      Website - Cosy Candles & Aromas
      Blog - Ruby's Crafty Diary
      Facebook Page

      Comment


      • #4
        Ruby is spot on and I'm the same I haven't used beeswax so can't tell you exactly what size/make of wick you should be using.

        Paraffin wax is completely different to beeswax and vegetable waxes and I assume the wicks that you used came out of paraffin tea lights so they may well burn okay with beeswax but I suspect a combination of beeswax/scent load/wax crayon is clogging the wick and causing it to drown.

        4 candles do beeswax tea light wicks and I will attach the link.

        Beeswax Tealight Wick

        HTH.

        Lisa

        Bowed Over
        Handmade Dog Collar Accessories
        www.bowedover.co.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          Hello again and thank you so much for the replies, I really appreciate your advice and the website address.

          Feeling rather silly and naive now! It was all a bit of a spur of the moment thing really as I was intending to make some blended oils for people but found I didn't have enough base oil left so thought I'd use the same essential oils but add them to the wax instead. I've adapted shop bought tea lights in the past by simply melting their own wax down and adding a tiny amount of wax crayon and essential oils which worked fine. Silly old me just assumed that I'd be able to do the same thing but using my beeswax...doh! I don't actually have any moulds and couldn't find whatever wick I bought years ago from the candle making workshop so I'm afraid I don't know what kind of wick it was exactly, just the one that came in the original tealight. I will now look into wicks, would be really satisfying to try it properly next time.

          I suppose I used the word "ton" as I was a bit upset at having used a lot of expensive essential oils like rose and tuberose but I used the same formula as I do for massage blends ie 2 drops of essential oil per 5ml base oil (or in this case melted wax)...with maybe a few extra drops thrown in for good measure! Did I use way too much? I'm trying to translate the formula girlyracer has given above but arithmetic isn't my strong point!

          I'm off to do a bit more reasearch and will let you guys know how I get on next time, thank you so much again.

          FG XXX

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't use EO's in my candles as they are sooooo expensive and many don't work well in wax. I stick to fragrance oils made specifically for candles these are cheaper (although not by much). You can try Jo at Sensory Perfection she has a great range and does small bottles so you don't need to burst the bank too much when getting some to try.

            I tend to work metric when I am working out my formula's for wax. If you use 100g of wax say you would use 8ml of FO for an 8% formula i.e. 8% of 100g is 8 (does that make sense I am absolutely useless at explaning).

            HTH.

            Lisa

            Bowed Over
            Handmade Dog Collar Accessories
            www.bowedover.co.uk

            Comment


            • #7
              Hello!

              I just make candles for fun, so I'm no expert ... but I always use essential oils. The "Fragrant ********" book recommends 30-60 drops per 225g of wax.

              As for why your candle isn't burning, I don't use beeswax either but I found this for you on Yahoo:
              Why are my beeswax candles not burning properly?
              http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...9211210AAlQ9Kj

              Maybe it will be of some help!
              Carol

              Resin jewellery, encaustic art paintings & gifts | Twitter!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the advice once again guys, I really appreciate it. Is the book you (half) mentioned a scented candlemaking book, cbld? I'd be interested to know the author and title.

                FG XXX

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's one of those words that gets filtered out on here because it could be spammy! Will write it phonetically...

                  The Fragrant Farm-Ah-See (!) by Valerie Ann Worwood. It's an Aromatherapy book but describes other uses for essential oils besides traditional aromatherapy treatments - such as soaps, candles, in cooking etc.

                  Tried to do a link to it on Amazon, but it won't work because of the word filter. If you go to Amazon and type in "Valerie Ann Worwood", it should come up though.

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_...wood&x=18&y=18
                  Carol

                  Resin jewellery, encaustic art paintings & gifts | Twitter!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    beeswax needs a thicker wick than other waxes. you cant use the wicks from regular tealights as they are too thin. you need to get thicker wick - twice as thick for beeswax as other waxes. you need to half fill the tealight and let it cool and then fill it again - this helps with the cracking for me.

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