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Removing Air Bubble from Candles

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  • Removing Air Bubble from Candles

    Hi everyone

    I am about to begin making my first candle and would like a little advice please.

    I have read about poking small holes around the wick to prevent air bubbles however my mould is a bit wierd as the wick hole is at the bottom so basically its upside down. Is there a way to do this or will I need to find a way of flipping the mould over? (its a solid plastic mould)

    Also how far down do the holes need to go and what do you use to do it?

    Thanks very much in advance, I am bursting to get started but I dont want to be taken to a small claims court for third degree burns
    Im down with Fraggle Rock

    Fraggies Fripperies

    http://fraggiesfripperies.blogspot.com

  • #2
    my daughter makes candles i think she just keeps tapping the sides and topping them up one tip is when it is set and you are trying to get it out of the mould stick it in the fridge for a while they can be very hard to get out
    Jan xx



    http://craftyjan.blogspot.com/

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. I've worked it out was having a 'fraggie' moment lol
      Im down with Fraggle Rock

      Fraggies Fripperies

      http://fraggiesfripperies.blogspot.com

      Comment


      • #4
        if your wick hole is at the bottom then the bubbles wont effect the top of your candle.
        if you do get any bubbles they will rise to the "bottom of your candle
        as you pour the wax in, make sure your molud is at room temperature or slightly warmer & pour in very slowly, also stir in your colour & fragrance slowly this will ensure you dont cause bubbles from stirring

        after you have poured lightly tap the sides of the mold to loosen any bubbles

        Comment


        • #5
          thanks for that

          I worked that out in the end, lord I am a numpty. Sometimes I wonder how I managed to get to adulthood
          Im down with Fraggle Rock

          Fraggies Fripperies

          http://fraggiesfripperies.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Bubbles

            De gassing liquids.

            I would agree that tapping the side of a mould will work as it dislodges the gas bubbles from the sides of a vessel. However it won’t speed up the process significantly as the gas bubble still has to overcome the friction of the fluid which will increase as the temperature decreases.

            There is away round this, as there always is. A method that is used in industry is to subject the liquid to a vacuum as this will allow the gas bubble to expand and over come the liquid friction far more easily.

            Now for some ‘Blue Peter’ engineering. You will need a vacuum cleaner, some stiff plastic tubing and a container with a lid that will hold the candle comfortably (a tall glass container with a cork lid for example). Pop the candle mould into the container so that you can pour the molten wax or what ever you are using into the mould. Make a hole in the containers lid a fix one end of the plastic pipe into it. Attach the other end of the pipe to a vacuum cleaner suction nozzle, electrical tape is good for this. You will need to be able to control the amount of suction that the vacuum cleaner can give so if the nozzle has an air bleed, then make sure it is open. Or failing this make a slit in the tubing so that you can put a finger or thumb over the slit to control the suction.

            Next fill the mould with the candle wax material, hold the lid over the top of the container and turn on the vacuum cleaner. Using your finger or thumb control the amount of suction to the container. After about 30 seconds or so all the gas bubbles will have come out of the liquid wax. You will have to be quite careful as vacuum degassing is VERY effective and you won’t need to drop the pressure in the container very much at all. Basically a gentle ‘suck’ is all you need to be very effective, just be careful that you don’t over do the suction as it does work very effectively. Allow the mould to cool before handling. If you use a transparent container, one with a cork lid say, then you will be able to see what is happening as you reduce the pressure.

            This method is the approved method for degassing adhesives for use on spacecraft and as I say, is very effective. Just be careful and reduce the pressure in the container SLOWLY, it is ‘that’ effective.

            I..
            www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/?saved=1

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow, what an interesting way to remove air!!!

              What i do is tap the moulds and look down the candle too, sometimes you can see them lurking around (especially if it's a transparent mould). when the candle is kinda sticky (like syrup), get a BBQ wooden skewer thing and at the current top of the candle (where you pour the wax in) pierce a few holes, right down to about 2cm or so from the "bottom" of the candle! These should be around the wick and it is very important to do. Large air pockets can become lodged in the candle and adding these holes helps release it. When you do the final overpour, this should fill any possible holes and nicely cover the scars!!!
              Why do tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bathtime Temptations View Post
                if your wick hole is at the bottom then the bubbles wont effect the top of your candle.
                if you do get any bubbles they will rise to the "bottom of your candle
                as you pour the wax in, make sure your molud is at room temperature or slightly warmer & pour in very slowly, also stir in your colour & fragrance slowly this will ensure you dont cause bubbles from stirring

                after you have poured lightly tap the sides of the mold to loosen any bubbles

                very useful idea

                thank you

                Comment


                • #9
                  Degassing resin using ultrasound

                  Hi, I was wondering if anyone has tried degassing epoxy resin by using an ultrasonic cleaner. Someone working in the dental industry suggested that to me but I haven't tried yet. I'm talking about those toaster-like inexpensive ultrasound cleaners used for cleaning for example silver.

                  Thanks!

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