Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

riven edge to slate

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • riven edge to slate

    Hi,

    I recycle some slate tiles and make chalk boards and coasters and things. I use a small chisel to get the riven edge after cutting but wondered if anyone out there had any better ideas as it is a pain and easy to chip and break.

    Cheers

    Phil

  • #2
    can you not use a sander?
    full time mum and very very part time crafter.

    Comment


    • #3
      Have you tried using a grindstone in Dremel type tool?
      Pat Murphy


      http://www.gladturnings.co.uk
      https://www.facebook.com/GladTurnings.Woodturning

      Comment


      • #4
        I should have explained my problem better. I am trying to get rid of the smooth edge and recreate the riven edge you get on roof slates.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm no expert on slate but i weathered the edges of some roof slates last year ( to blend newer ones in with the old ones on our roof ) and to do this i repeatedly tapped the edge onto concrete holding the slate at an angle just off vertical.

          I offer no guarantee of success but it may be worth a try
          http://www.dosrodgerspottery.co.uk/

          Comment


          • #6
            The only way I know how to get the 'riven' edge to roof slate is by using a roofers 'stake' and a knife (don't know the correct name) it has the handle bent to the side a little so that the blade is about an inch to the left of the handle. One top of the blade you have a triangular spike which was used to punch the nails holes into the slate edge.

            The stake is shaped like a 'T' with the lower tail as a spike. You hold one end of the 'T' and slam the spike into some timber. Then lay the edge of the slate on the 'T' top edge so it is supported, then use the knife in a chopping motion so the 'T' and the blade come together like a pair of scissors. If you are careful you get a straight edge on top, but the underneath breaks away a little and leaves the riven edge you talk about.

            I'm sure it wouldn't be too hard to improvise something to cut on, say a bit of angle iron in a vice, and a cheap axe would do the trick.
            regards

            Tam "now a hobby woodturner"


            There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. (John Ruskin 1819-1900)

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks. I will give these a try.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'd have thought sandwiching the tile between two solid straight edged surfaces followed by a few swift blows with another solid straight edge (e.g. a bricklaying trowel) would create a nice riven edge. Could probably get away with just using the one straight edge with the slate overhanging it.
                Crafter of little cube character plush toys

                Cubely.co.uk

                DeviantArt Profile
                Twitter!

                Comment


                • #9


                  Just did a search on youtube and found this guy. I have no idea about tiles but im sure this is what tepe was explaining. This guy also has a load of other slate related videos.

                  Hope that helps.

                  Drew
                  Our Website & Blog (work in Progress)
                  our Facebook page
                  follow me on Twitter @handywoodcrafts

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Found a photo of the 'knife', in conjunction with the video above you should be able to figure a easy way to do the cutting.
                    regards

                    Tam "now a hobby woodturner"


                    There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. (John Ruskin 1819-1900)

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X