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Which gauge wire for beading?

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  • Which gauge wire for beading?

    I'd like to know what thickness of sterling silver wire anyone uses to string beads onto and then to attach to sterling chain - to make a design like this . . . . . .



    I know it would be better to wire-wrap the beads and link them but I just can't do that nice enough so this is my easier alternative.
    Auntynet

    Step-daughter's website selling hand dyed sock yarns www.knotanotherknitter.com




    ~ * ~ * ~ Of all the things I've ever lost, I miss my mind the most! ~ * ~ * ~

  • #2
    I usually use half hard .8mm or .9mm for anything like this. It is strong enough to hold it's shape but not too thick to go through the bead holes and doesn't look too heavy.

    Melanie

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    • #3
      do you need to use wire?

      I would use tigertail or similar and attach to a wire loop or jump ring with crimps. This would give you flexibility without costing a fortune.
      www.beadlab.com

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      • #4
        Whenever I've made this kind of necklace in the past I've always used tigertail too but I have a customer who "would prefer it all to be sterling"!!!!

        Who am I to argue if she's willing to pay the extra? - double/treble the profit on sterling is more than it is on tigertail.
        Auntynet

        Step-daughter's website selling hand dyed sock yarns www.knotanotherknitter.com




        ~ * ~ * ~ Of all the things I've ever lost, I miss my mind the most! ~ * ~ * ~

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        • #5
          Beadalon do a sterling "tiger tail" style wire
          www.beadlab.com

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          • #6
            I would use eye pins through each bead to link to the next and head pins to make the earings

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            • #7
              Originally posted by shiner View Post
              I would use eye pins through each bead to link to the next and head pins to make the earings
              I know that's what I should do but my loops aren't always neat enough - I can do basic circles perfectly but I'm not too hot on the wire twisting so I tend to shy away from it and I do think that a design like this one (as any piece really) should be secure so loops alone aren't strong enough.
              Auntynet

              Step-daughter's website selling hand dyed sock yarns www.knotanotherknitter.com




              ~ * ~ * ~ Of all the things I've ever lost, I miss my mind the most! ~ * ~ * ~

              Comment


              • #8
                I use 0.6mm for lightweight beads and 0.8mm for my glass beads. I wouldn't use anything less than 0.8mm if you're not wrapping the loops as a thinner wire might not hold a loop sufficiently firmly, especially if it's subjected to a bit of occasional tugging.
                Heather
                Artisan Glass Beads & Jewellery
                www.BumpyBeads.co.uk
                http://www.etsy.com/shop/BumpyBeads

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                • #9
                  If the beads can brittle - like pearl, nacre, bone, coral, fossil wood etc, soft coated wires are better, but if they are to stay a bit stiff (like in composite pendants) then wire is obviously the thing to choose. I have used as thin as 0.3 mm for small beads with no problems, usually 0.6 to 0.9 will do good. Remember that hard and half-hard silver will soften if heated, so eventually points of welding have to be done more sturdy so as to prevent repeated bending and breaking of the wire.

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